195 Works

Life history genomic regions explain differences in Atlantic salmon marine diet specialization

Tutku Aykanat, Martin Rasmussen, Mikhail Ozerov, Eero Niemelä, Lars Paulin, Juha-Pekka Vaha, Kjetil Hindar, Vidar Wennevik, Torstein Pedersen, Martin Svenning & Craig Primmer
Abstract 1. Animals employ various foraging strategies along their ontogeny to acquire energy, and with varying degree of efficiencies, to support growth, maturation and subsequent reproduction events. Individuals that can efficiently acquire energy early are more likely to mature at an earlier age, as a result of faster energy gain which can fuel maturation and reproduction. 2. We aimed to test the hypothesis that heritable resource acquisition variation that co-varies with efficiency along the ontogeny...

Disentangling the latitudinal and altitudinal shifts in community composition induced by climate change: the case of riparian birds

Elie Gaget, Vincent Devictor, Bernard Frochot, Régis Desbrosses, Marie-Christine Eybert & Bruno Faivre
Aim. This study investigates whether, and how the composition of riparian bird communities has been affected by climate warming and habitat change. Although these two forces act separately, their respective contributions are rarely examined. Moreover, while the response of a given community may be a function of latitude and altitude, most studies have focused on these gradients separately. Riparian ecosystems are an opportunity to investigate community change along latitudinal and elevational gradients. Location. France, three...

A Visual Essay: Enabling Entanglements of Cloth and the Body

Katve-Kaisa Kontturi & Vappu Jalonen

Data from: Globally, functional traits are weak predictors of juvenile tree growth, and we do not know why

C. E. Timothy Paine, Lucy Amissah, Harald Auge, Christopher Baraloto, Martin Baruffol, Nils Bourland, Helge Bruelheide, Kasso Daïnou, Roland C. De Gouvenain, Jean-Louis Doucet, Susan Doust, Paul V. A. Fine, Claire Fortunel, Josephine Haase, Karen D. Holl, Hervé Jactel, Xuefei Li, Kaoru Kitajima, Julia Koricheva, Cristina Martínez-Garza, Christian Messier, Alain Paquette, Christopher Philipson, Daniel Piotto, Lourens Poorter … & Andy Hector
1. Plant functional traits, in particular specific leaf area (SLA), wood density and seed mass, are often good predictors of individual tree growth rates within communities. Individuals and species with high SLA, low wood density and small seeds tend to have faster growth rates. 2. If community-level relationships between traits and growth have general predictive value, then similar relationships should also be observed in analyses that integrate across taxa, biogeographic regions and environments. Such global...

Data from: Pulsed food resources, but not forest cover, determines lifetime reproductive success in a forest-dwelling rodent

Katrine S. Hoset, Alexandre Villers, Ralf Wistbacka & Vesa Selonen
1. The relative contributions of habitat and food availability on fitness may provide evidence for key habitat features needed to safeguard population persistence. However, defining habitat quality for a species can be a complex task, especially if knowledge on the relationship between individual performance and habitat quality is lacking. 2. Here, we determined the relative importance of availability of suitable forest habitat, body mass, and food from masting tree species on female lifetime reproductive success...

Data from: Independent and interactive effects of immune activation and larval diet on adult immune function, growth and development in the greater wax moth (Galleria mellonella)

Katariina Kangassalo, Terhi M. Valtonen, Jouni Sorvari, Sanita Kecko, Mari Pölkki, Indrikis Krams, Tatjana Krama & Markus J. Rantala
Organisms in the wild are likely to face multiple immune challenges as well as additional ecological stressors, yet their interactive effects on immune function are poorly understood. Insects are found to respond to cues of increased infection risk by enhancing their immune capacity. However, such adaptive plasticity in immune function may be limited by physiological and environmental constraints. Here, we investigated the effects of two environmental stressors – poor larval diet and an artificial parasite-like...

Data from: Elevated oxidative stress in pied flycatcher nestlings of eumelanic foster fathers under low rearing temperatures

Pauliina E. Teerikorpi, Janina Stauffer, Petteri Ilmonen, Sara Calhim, Wiebke Schuett & Toni Laaksonen
Striking variation in melanin coloration within natural populations is likely due to the different fitness outcomes of alternative phenotypes in varying environmental conditions. There are two types of melanins. Eumelanins yield blackish hues, while pheomelanins yield reddish hues. The production of eumelanins requires low levels of glutathione (GSH), which is the most important intracellular antioxidant, while the production of pheomelanins requires high levels of GSH. We investigated the oxidative status of male pied flycatchers (Ficedula...

Data from: Effects of interspecific coexistence on laying date and clutch size in two closely related species of hole‐nesting birds

Anders Pape Møller, Javier Balbontin, André A. Dhondt, Vladimir Remeš, Frank Adriaensen, Clotilde Biard, Jordi Camprodon, Mariusz Cichoń, Blandine Doligez, Anna Dubiec, Marcel Eens, Tapio Eeva, Anne E. Goodenough, Andrew G. Gosler, Lars Gustafsson, Philipp Heeb, Shelley A. Hinsley, Staffan Jacob, Rimvydas Juškaitis, Toni Laaksonen, Bernard Leclercq, Bruno Massa, Tomasz D. Mazgajski, Rudi G. Nager, Jan-Åke Nilsson … & Ruedi G. Nager
Coexistence between great tits Parus major and blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus, but also other hole‐nesting taxa, constitutes a classic example of species co‐occurrence resulting in potential interference and exploitation competition for food and for breeding and roosting sites. However, the spatial and temporal variations in coexistence and its consequences for competition remain poorly understood. We used an extensive database on reproduction in nest boxes by great and blue tits based on 87 study plots across...

Data from: Association of in utero persistent organic pollutant exposure with placental thyroid hormones

Zhong-Min Li, David Hernandez-Moreno, Katharina Maria Main, Niels Erik Skakkebæk, Hannu Kiviranta, Jorma Toppari, Ulla Feldt-Rasmussen, Heqing Shen, Karl-Werner Schramm & Meri De Angelis
In utero exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) can result in thyroid function disorder, leading to concerns about their impact on fetal and neonatal development. The present study was performed to investigate the associations between placental levels of various POPs and thyroid hormones (THs). In a prospective Danish study initially established for assessing congenital cryptorchidism, 58 placenta samples were collected from mothers of boys born with (28) and without (30) cryptorchidism. The concentrations of polybrominated...

Data from: The effect of landscape structure on dispersal distances of the Eurasian red squirrel

Suvi Hämäläinen, Karen Fey & Vesa Selonen
Landscape structure can affect dispersal and gene flow in a species. In urban areas, buildings, roads and small habitat patches make the landscape highly fragmented and can inhibit movement and affect dispersal behavior. Similarly, in rural forested areas, large open areas, such as fields, may act as barriers to movement. We studied how landscape structure affects natal dispersal distances of Eurasian red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) in an urban area and a rural area in Finland,...

Data from: Genetic and phenotypic relationships between immune defense, melanism and life history traits at different temperatures and sexes in Tenebrio molitor

Markus J. Rantala, Jenni Prokkola, Derek Roff, Tiia Kärkkäinen & Indrikis Krams
Insect cuticle melanism is linked to a number of life-history traits, and a positive relationship is hypothesized between melanism and the strength of immune defense. In this study, the phenotypic and genetic relationships between cuticular melanization, innate immune defense, individual development time and body size were studied in the mealworm beetle (Tenebrio molitor) using three different temperatures with a half-sib breeding design. Both innate immune defense and cuticle darkness were higher in females than males,...

Data from: Adiposity, compared with masculinity, serves as a more valid cue to immunocompetence in human mate choice

Markus J. Rantala, Vinet Coetzee, Fhionna R. Moore, Ilona Skrinda, Sanita Kecko, Tatjana Krama, Inese Kivleniece & Indrikis Krams
According to the “good genes” hypothesis, females choose males based on traits that indicate the male’s genetic quality in terms of disease resistance. The “immunocompetence handicap hypothesis (ICHH)” proposed that secondary sexual traits serve as indicators of male genetic quality because they indicate that males can contend with the immunosuppressive effects of testosterone. Masculinity is commonly assumed to serve as such a secondary sexual trait. Yet women do not consistently prefer masculine looking men, nor...

Data from: Genetic and life-history changes associated with fisheries-induced population collapse

Lilian Pukk, Anna Kuparinen, Leili Järv, Riho Gross & Anti Vasemägi
Over the recent years, growing number of studies suggests that intensive size-selective fishing can cause evolutionary changes in life-history traits in the harvested population, which can have drastic negative effects on populations, ecosystems and fisheries. However, most studies to date have overlooked the potential role of immigration of fish with different phenotypes as an alternative plausible mechanism behind observed phenotypic trends. Here, we investigated the evolutionary consequences of intensive fishing simultaneously at phenotypic and molecular...

Data from: Divergent selection on, but no genetic conflict over, female and male timing and rate of reproduction in a human population

Elisabeth Bolund, Sandra Bouwhuis, Jenni E. Pettay & Virpi Lummaa
The sexes often have different phenotypic optima for important life-history traits, and because of a largely shared genome this can lead to a conflict over trait expression. In mammals, the obligate costs of reproduction are higher for females, making reproductive timing and rate especially liable to conflict between the sexes. While studies from wild vertebrates support such sexual conflict, it remains unexplored in humans. We used a pedigreed human population from preindustrial Finland to estimate...

Data from: Positive relationships between association strength and phenotypic similarity characterize the assembly of mixed-species bird flocks worldwide

Hari Sridhar, Umesh Srinivasan, Robert A. Askins, Julio Cesar Canales Delgadillo, Chao-Chieh Chen, David N. Ewert, George A. Gale, Eben Goodale, Wendy K. Gram, Patrick J. Hart, Keith A. Hobson, Richard L. Hutto, Sarath W. Kotagama, Jessie L. Knowlton, Tien Ming Lee, Charles A. Munn, Somchai Nimnuan, B. Z. Nizam, Guillaume Péron, V. V. Robin, Amanda D. Rodewald, Paul G. Rodewald, Robert L. Thomson, Pranav Trivedi, Steven L. Van Wilgenburg … & Kartik Shanker
Competition theory predicts that communities at small spatial scales should consist of species more dissimilar than expected by chance. We find a strikingly different pattern in a multi-continent dataset (55 presence-absence matrices from 24 locations) on the composition of mixed-species bird flocks, important subunits of local bird communities the world over. Using null models and randomization tests followed by meta-analysis, we find the association strength of species in flocks to be strongly related to similarity...

Data from: Heterospecific aggression bias towards a rarer colour morph

Topi K. Lehtonen, Will Sowersby & Bob B. M. Wong
Colour polymorphisms are a striking example of phenotypic diversity, yet the sources of selection that allow different morphs to persist within populations remain poorly understood. In particular, despite the importance of aggression in mediating social dominance, few studies have considered how heterospecific aggression might contribute to the maintenance or divergence of different colour morphs. To redress this gap, we carried out a field-based study in a Nicaraguan crater lake to investigate patterns of heterospecific aggression...

Data from: Low but significant genetic differentiation underlies biologically meaningful phenotypic divergence in a large Atlantic salmon population

Tutku Aykanat, Susan E. Johnston, Eero Niemelä, Panu Orell, Jaakko Erkinaro & Craig R. Primmer
Despite decades of research assessing the genetic structure of natural populations, the biological meaning of low yet significant genetic divergence often remains unclear due to a lack of associated phenotypic and ecological information. At the same time, structured populations with low genetic divergence and overlapping boundaries can potentially provide excellent models to study adaptation and reproductive isolation in cases where high-resolution genetic markers and relevant phenotypic and life history information are available. Here, we combined...

Data from: Allopatry, competitor recognition and heterospecific aggression in crater lake cichlids

Topi K. Lehtonen, Karine Gagnon, Will Sowersby & Bob B. M. Wong
Background: Aggressive behaviour can have significant evolutionary consequences - not only within species, but also in the context of heterospecific interactions. Here, we carried out an experimental field study to investigate the importance of phenotypic similarity on levels of aggression between species whilst controlling for familiarity effects using manipulated allopatric stimuli. Specifically, we investigated aggressive responses of territory holding males and females in two species of Neotropical cichlid fish, Amphilophus sagittae and Hypsophrys nicaraguensis, that...

Data from: Morphological and taxonomic demarcation of Brachionus asplanchnoidis Charin within the Brachionus plicatilis cryptic species complex (Rotifera, Monogononta)

Evangelia Michaloudi, Scott Mills, Spiros Papakostas, Claus-Peter Stelzer, Alexander Triantafyllidis, Ilias Kappas, Kalliopi Vasileiadou, Konstantinos Proios & Theodore John Abatzopoulos
Three well-defined groups, consisting of 15 species, have recently been ascribed to organisms historically identified as the Brachionus plicatilis species complex. One of these groups, the Large-clade is composed of two named species (Brachionus plicatilis s.s. and Brachionus manjavacas) and two species identifiers (B. 'Nevada' and B. 'Austria'). B. 'Austria' has been confirmed to be B. asplanchnoidis. As no type specimen exists for this species, and the original taxonomic description is lacking in detail, we...

Data from: Diversity and linkage disequilibrium in farmed Tasmanian Atlantic salmon

James W. Kijas, Nick Elliot, Peter Kube, Bradley Evans, Natasha Botwright, Harry King, Craig R. Primmer, Klara Verbyla & J. Kijas
Farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) is a globally important production species, including in Australia where breeding and selection has been in progress since the 1960s. The recent development of SNP genotyping platforms means genome-wide association and genomic prediction can now be implemented to speed genetic gain. As a precursor, this study collected genotypes at 218 132 SNPs in 777 fish from a Tasmanian breeding population to assess levels of genetic diversity, the strength of linkage...

Data from: Autosomal and X linked additive genetic variation for lifespan and aging: comparisons within and between the sexes in Drosophila melanogaster

Robert M. Griffin, Holger Schielzeth & Urban Friberg
Theory makes several predictions concerning differences in genetic variation between the X chromosome and the autosomes due to male X hemizygosity. The X chromosome should i) typically show relatively less standing genetic variation than the autosomes, ii) exhibit more variation in males compared to females because of dosage compensation, and iii) potentially be enriched with sex-specific genetic variation. Here we address each of these predictions for lifespan and aging in Drosophila melanogaster. To achieve unbiased...

Data from: Food supplementation and predation risk in harsh climate: interactive effects on abundance and body condition of tit species

Chiara Morosinotto, Alexandre Villers, Rauno Varjonen & Erkki Korpimäki
Food availability and predation risk can have drastic impacts on animal behaviour and populations. The tradeoff between foraging and predator avoidance is crucial for animal survival and will strongly affect individual body mass, since large fat reserves are beneficial to reduce starvation but may increase predation risk. However, two-factor experiments simultaneously investigating the interactive effects of food and predation risk, are still rare. We studied the effects of food supplementation and natural predation risk imposed...

Data from: Heterospecific female mimicry in Ficedula flycatchers

Sara Calhim, Peter Adamík, Pauliina Järvistö, Paula Leskinen, János Török, Kazumasa Wakamatsu & Toni Laaksonen
Mimicry is a widespread phenomenon. Vertebrate visual mimicry often operates in an intraspecific sexual context, with some males resembling conspecific females. Pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) dorsal plumage varies from the ancestral black to female-like brown. Experimental studies have shown that conspecific and heterospecific (collared flycatcher, F. albicollis) individuals of both sexes respond, at least initially, to brown individuals as if they were female. We quantified the perceptual and biochemical differences between brown feathers and found...

Data from: Genome-wide SNP analysis reveals a genetic basis for sea-age variation in a wild population of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

Susan E. Johnston, Panu Orell, Victoria L. Pritchard, Matthew P. Kent, Sigbjørn Lien, Eero Niemelä, Jaakko Erkinaro, Craig Primmer & Craig R. Primmer
Delaying sexual maturation can lead to larger body size and higher reproductive success, but carries an increased risk of death before reproducing. Classical life history theory predicts that trade-offs between reproductive success and survival should lead to the evolution of an optimal strategy in a given population. However, variation in mating strategies generally persists, and in general, there remains a poor understanding of genetic and physiological mechanisms underlying this variation. One extreme case of this...

Data from: Striking phenotypic variation yet low genetic differentiation in sympatric lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush)

Kia Marin, Andrew Coon, Robert Carson, Paul V. Debes & Dylan J. Fraser
The study of population differentiation in the context of ecological speciation is commonly assessed using populations with obvious discreteness. Fewer studies have examined diversifying populations with occasional adaptive variation and minor reproductive isolation, so factors impeding or facilitating the progress of early stage differentiation are less understood. We detected non-random genetic structuring in lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) inhabiting a large, pristine, postglacial lake (Mistassini Lake, Canada), with up to five discernible genetic clusters having distinctions...

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