33 Works

Time spent in distinct life-history stages has sex-specific effects on reproductive fitness in wild Atlantic salmon

Kenyon Mobley, Hanna Granroth-Wilding, Mikko Ellmen, Panu Orell, Jaakko Erkinaro & Craig Primmer
In species with complex life cycles, life history theory predicts that fitness is affected by conditions encountered in previous life history stages. Here, we use a four-year pedigree to investigate if time spent in two distinct life history stages has sex-specific reproductive fitness consequences in anadromous Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). We determined the amount of years spent in fresh water as juveniles (freshwater age, FW, measured in years), and years spent in the marine environment...

Data from: Biocultural approaches to sustainability: a systematic review of the scientific literature

Jan Hanspach, L. Jamila Haider, Elisa Oteris-Rozas, Anton Stahl Olafsson, Natalie Gulsrud, Chris Raymond, Mario Torralba, Berta Martín-López, Claudia Bieling, María García Martín, Christian Albert, Thomas Beery, Nora Fagerholm, Isabel Díaz-Reviriego, Annika Drews-Shambroom & Tobias Plieninger
Current sustainability challenges demand approaches that acknowledge a plurality of human-nature interactions and worldviews, for which biocultural approaches are considered appropriate and timely. This systematic review analyses the application of biocultural approaches to sustainability in scientific journal articles published between 1990 and 2018 through a mixed methods approach combining qualitative content analysis and quantitative multivariate methods. The study identifies seven distinct biocultural lenses, i.e. different ways of understanding and applying biocultural approaches, which to different...

Data from: Increased glucocorticoid concentrations in early life cause mitochondrial inefficiency and short telomeres

Stefania Casagrande, Antoine Stier, Pat Monaghan, Winniefred Boner, Jasmine Loveland, Sara Lupi, Rachele Trevisi & Michaela Hau
Telomeres are DNA structures that protect chromosome ends. However, telomeres shorten during cell replication and at critically low lengths can reduce cell replicative potential, induce cell senescence and decrease fitness. Stress exposure, which elevates glucocorticoid hormone concentrations, can exacerbate telomere attrition. This phenomenon has been attributed to increased oxidative stress generated by glucocorticoids ("oxidative stress hypothesis"). We recently instead suggested that glucocorticoids increase telomere attrition during stressful periods by reducing the resources available for telomere...

Predation risk in relation to brain size in alternative prey of pygmy owls varies depending on the abundance of main prey

Anders Møller, Kari Hongisto & Erkki Korpimäki
Large brains in prey may allow adoption of anti-predator behavior that facilitates escape. Prey species with relatively large brains have been shown to be less likely to fall prey to predators. This leads to the hypothesis that individuals that have been captured by predators on average should have smaller brains than sympatric individuals. We exploited the fact that Eurasian pygmy owls Glaucidium passerinum hoard small mammals and birds in cavities and nest-boxes for over-winter survival,...

Data for: Risk in the circular food economy: Glyphosate-based herbicide residues in manure fertilizers decrease crop yield

Anne Muola, Benjamin Fuchs, Miika Laihonen, Kalle Rainio, Lauri Heikkonen, Suvi Ruuskanen, Kari Saikkonen & Marjo Helander
Glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) are the most frequently used herbicides globally. They were launched as a safe solution for weed control, but recently, an increasing number of studies have shown the existence of GBH residues and highlighted the associated risks they pose throughout ecosystems. Conventional agricultural practices often include the use of GBHs, and the use of glyphosate-resistant genetically modified crops is largely based on the application of glyphosate, which increases the likelihood of its residues...

Data from: The difference between generalist and specialist: the effects of wide fluctuations in main food abundance on numbers and reproduction of two co-existing predators

Erkki Korpimäki, Kari Hongisto, Giulia Masoero & Toni Laaksonen
Specialist individuals within animal populations have shown to be more efficient foragers and/or to have higher reproductive success than generalist individuals, but interspecific reproductive consequences of the degree of diet specialisation in vertebrate predators have remained unstudied. Eurasian pygmy owls (hereafter POs) have less vole-specialised diets than Tengmalm’s owls (TOs), both of which mainly subsist on temporally fluctuating food resources (voles). To test whether the specialist TO is more limited by the main prey abundance...

Life history genomic regions explain differences in Atlantic salmon marine diet specialization

Tutku Aykanat, Martin Rasmussen, Mikhail Ozerov, Eero Niemelä, Lars Paulin, Juha-Pekka Vaha, Kjetil Hindar, Vidar Wennevik, Torstein Pedersen, Martin Svenning & Craig Primmer
Abstract 1. Animals employ various foraging strategies along their ontogeny to acquire energy, and with varying degree of efficiencies, to support growth, maturation and subsequent reproduction events. Individuals that can efficiently acquire energy early are more likely to mature at an earlier age, as a result of faster energy gain which can fuel maturation and reproduction. 2. We aimed to test the hypothesis that heritable resource acquisition variation that co-varies with efficiency along the ontogeny...

Disentangling the latitudinal and altitudinal shifts in community composition induced by climate change: the case of riparian birds

Elie Gaget, Vincent Devictor, Bernard Frochot, Régis Desbrosses, Marie-Christine Eybert & Bruno Faivre
Aim. This study investigates whether, and how the composition of riparian bird communities has been affected by climate warming and habitat change. Although these two forces act separately, their respective contributions are rarely examined. Moreover, while the response of a given community may be a function of latitude and altitude, most studies have focused on these gradients separately. Riparian ecosystems are an opportunity to investigate community change along latitudinal and elevational gradients. Location. France, three...

Contrasting multi-level relationships between behavior and body mass in blue tit nestlings

Barbara Class & Jon Brommer
Repeatable behaviors (i.e. animal personality) are pervasive in the animal kingdom and various mechanisms have been proposed to explain their existence. Genetic and non-genetic mechanisms, which can be equally important, predict correlations between behavior and body mass on different levels (e.g. genetic, environmental) of variation. We investigated multi-level relationships between body mass measured on weeks 1, 2, and 3 and three behavioral responses to handling, measured on week 3, and which form a behavioral syndrome...

Data from: Neighborhood bully: no difference in territorial response towards neighbors or strangers in marmots

Mariona Ferrandiz-Rovira, Timothée Zidat, Pierre Dupont, Vérane Berger, Célia Rézouki & Aurélie Cohas
Territorial animals are expected to adjust their response to intruders according to the perceived threat-level. One of the factors that drives threat-level is the identity of the intruder. The dear enemy phenomenon theory postulates that individuals should respond with lower intensity to neighbors, already possessing a territory, than to strangers that may fight to evict them. In social species, the hierarchical status of the intruder might also mediate this response. Such behavioral adjustments presuppose a...

Data from: Can dominance genetic variance be ignored in evolutionary quantitative genetic analyses of wild populations?

Barbara Class & Jon Brommer
Accurately estimating genetic variance components is important for studying evolution in the wild. Empirical work on domesticated and wild outbred populations suggests that dominance genetic variance represents a substantial part of genetic variance, and theoretical work predicts that ignoring dominance can inflate estimates of additive genetic variance. Whether this issue is pervasive in natural systems is unknown, because we lack estimates of dominance variance in wild populations obtained in situ. Here, we estimate dominance and...

Lupclip: Annual mowing has the potential to reduce the invasion of herbaceous Lupinus polyphyllus

Satu Ramula
In order to manage invasive plant species efficiently, it is necessary to have a thorough understanding of different strategies of population control, including the underlying mechanisms of action and the consequences for target populations. Here, I explored the effectiveness of biomass removal as a method of control for the invasive perennial herb Lupinus polyphyllus. More specifically, using seed material from 11 populations, I assessed among-population variation (if any) in plant compensatory growth as a response...

The roles of temperature, nest predators and information parasites for geographical variation in egg covering behaviour of tits (Paridae)

Olli Loukola, Peter Adamik, Frank Adriaensen, Emilio Barba, Blandine Doligez, Einar Flensted-Jensen, Tapio Eeva, Sami Kivelä, Toni Laaksonen, Chiara Morosinotto, Raivo Mänd, Petri Niemelä, Vladimir Remeš, Jelmer Samplonius, Manrico Sebastiano, Juan Carlos Senar, Tore Slagsvold, Alberto Sorace, Barbara Tschirren, János Török & Jukka Forsman
Aim: Nest building is widespread among animals. Nests may provide receptacles for eggs, developing offspring and the parents, and protect them from adverse environmental conditions. Nests may also indicate the quality of the territory and its owner and can be considered as an extended phenotype of its builder(s). Nests may, thus, function as a sexual and social signal. Here, we examined ecological and abiotic factors—temperature, nest predation and interspecific information utilization—shaping geographical variation in a...

Introduced plants of Lupinus polyphyllus are larger but flower less frequently than conspecifics from the native range: Results of the first year

Satu Ramula & Aino Kalske
Introduced species, which establish in novel environments, provide an opportunity to explore trait evolution and how it may contribute to the distribution and spread of species. Here, we explore trait changes of the perennial herb Lupinus polyphyllus based on 11 native populations in the western USA and 17 introduced populations in Finland. More specifically, we investigated whether introduced populations outperformed native populations in traits measured in situ (seed mass) and under common garden conditions during...

Data from: Evolution of defence and herbivory in introduced plants - testing enemy release using a known source population, herbivore trials and time since introduction

Claire Brandenburger, Martin Kim, Eve Slavich, Floret Meredith, Juha-Pekka Salminen, William Sherwin & Angela Moles
The enemy release hypothesis is often cited as a potential explanation for the success of introduced plants; yet empirical evidence for enemy release is mixed. We aimed to quantify changes in herbivory and defence in introduced plants while controlling for three factors that might have confounded past studies: using a wide native range for comparison with the introduced range, measuring defence traits without determining whether they affect herbivore preferences, and not considering the effect of...

Don’t judge a lizard by its colour: no evidence for differential socio-sexual behaviour and space use in the colour morphs of the European common wall lizard (Podarcis muralis)

Javier Abalos, Guillem Pérez I De Lanuza, Alicia Bartolomé, Océane Liehrmann, Hanna Laakkonen, Fabien Aubret, Tobias Uller, Pau Carazo & Enrique Font
Explaining the evolutionary origin and maintenance of colour polymorphisms is a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Such polymorphisms are commonly thought to reflect the existence of alternative behavioural or life-history strategies under negative frequency-dependent selection. The European common wall lizard Podarcis muralis exhibits a striking ventral colour polymorphism that has been intensely studied and is often assumed to reflect alternative reproductive strategies, similar to the iconic “rock-paper-scissors” system described in the North American lizard Uta...

Supplementary material for: Exploring the impact of unstable terminals on branch support values in paleontological data

Jorge R Flores, Samuli Lehtonen & Jaakko Hyvönen
The dataset consists of a PDF file and two plain-text TNT scripts (*.run files). The PDF includes supporting Figures for the additional analyses conducted by Flores et al. on paleontological datasets. The TNT scripts conduct two complementary sets of analyses: (a) evaluation of taxon instability relative to the incompleteness ("mc.run"), and (b) changes in branch support values after pruning unstable taxa ("avmc.run"). To properly run these files in TNT, the name of the matrix files...

Mind the outgroup and bare branches in total-evidence dating: a case study of Pimpliform Darwin Wasps (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae)

Tamara Spasojevic, Ilari E. Sääksjärvi, Masato Ito, Stanislav Korenko, Seraina Klopfstein, Gavin R. Broad & Martin Schwarz
Taxon sampling is a central aspect of phylogenetic study design, but it has received limited attention in the context of total-evidence dating, a widely used dating approach that directly integrates molecular and morphological information from extant and fossil taxa. We here assess the impact of commonly employed outgroup sampling schemes and missing morphological data in extant taxa on age estimates in a total-evidence dating analysis under the uniform tree prior. Our study group is Pimpliformes,...

Data from: Fledging mass is color morph specific and affects local recruitment in a wild bird

Chiara Morosinotto, Jon Brommer, Atte Lindqvist, Kari Ahola, Esa Aaltonen, Teuvo Karstinen & Patrik Karell
Early life conditions may have long-lasting effects on life history. In color polymorphic species, morph-specific sensitivity to environmental conditions may lead to differential fitness. In tawny owl (Strix aluco) pheomelanin-based color polymorphism is expected to be maintained because the brown morph has higher adult fitness in warmer environments, while selection favors the grey morph under colder conditions. Here we investigate body mass at fledging and its consequences until adulthood in a population at the species’...

Data from: The evolution of competitive ability for essential resources

Joey R. Bernhardt, Pavel Kratina, Aaron Pereira, Manu Tamminen, Mridul K. Thomas & Anita Narwani
Competition for limiting resources is among the most fundamental ecological interactions and has long been considered a key driver of species coexistence and biodiversity. Species' minimum resource requirements, their R*s, are key traits that link individual physiological demands to the outcome of competition. However, a major question remains unanswered - to what extent are species’ competitive traits able to evolve in response to resource limitation? To address this knowledge gap, we performed an evolution experiment...

Data from: Assessing the effectiveness of a national protected area network in maintaining carnivore populations

Julien Terraube, Jasper Van Doninck, Pekka Helle & Mar Cabeza
Protected areas (PAs) are essential to prevent further biodiversity loss yet their effectiveness varies largely with governance and external threats. Although methodological advances have permitted assessments of PA effectiveness in mitigating deforestation, we still lack similar studies for the impact of PAs on wildlife populations. Here we demonstrate the application ofuse an innovative combination of matching methods and hurdle-mixed models with a large-scale and long-term dataset of unprecedented coverage for Finland’s large carnivore species. We...

Data from: Insect oviposition preference between Epichloë-symbiotic and -free grasses does not necessarily reflect larval performance

Miika Laihonen, Kari Saikkonen, Marjo Helander & Toomas Tammaru
Variation in plant communities is likely to modulate the feeding and oviposition behavior of herbivorous insects, and plant associated microbes are largely ignored in this context. Here we take into account that insects feeding on grasses commonly encounter systemic and vertically transmitted (via seeds) fungal Epichloë endophytes, which are regarded as defensive grass mutualists. Defensive mutualism is primarily attributable to alkaloids of fungal origin. To study the effects of Epichloë on insect behavior and performance,...

The relative role of rivers, environmental heterogeneity and species traits in driving compositional changes in Southeastern Amazonian bird assemblages

Marina Maximiano, Fernando D'Horta, Hanna Tuomisto, Gabriela Zuquim, Jasper Van Doninck & Camila Ribas
Amazonian rivers have been proposed to act as geographic barriers to species dispersal, either driving allopatric speciation or defining current distribution limits. The strength of the barrier varies according to the species ecological characteristics and the river physical properties. Environmental heterogeneity may also drive compositional changes, but have hardly been assessed in Amazonia. Aiming to understand the contributions of riverine barriers and environmental heterogeneity in shaping compositional changes in Amazonian forest bird assemblages, we focus...

Threats from the air: damselfly predation on diverse prey taxa

Eero J. Vesterinen, Kari Kaunisto, , Mark Forbes, Andre Morrill, Anna Puisto, Ilari Sääksjärvi & Thomas Lilley
1. To understand the diversity and strength of predation in natural communities, researchers must quantify the total amount of prey species in the diet of predators. Metabarcoding approaches have allowed widespread characterization of predator diets with high taxonomic resolution. To determine the wider impacts of predators, researchers should combine DNA techniques with estimates of population size of predators using mark-release-recapture (MRR) methods, and with accurate metrics of food consumption by individuals. 2. Herein, we estimate...

Latitudinal pattern in community-wide herbivory does not match the pattern in herbivory averaged across common plant species

Elena Zvereva, Vitali Zverev, Vladimir Usoltsev & Mikhail Kozlov
1. The latitudinal herbivory hypothesis (LHH) predicts that plant losses to herbivores decrease from low to high latitudes. Although the LHH is a community-level hypothesis, it has been rarely tested with data on community-wide herbivory, i.e. the percentage of annual production of foliar biomass consumed by insects from all plant species at a given site. Therefore, we asked whether community-wide leaf herbivory follows the same latitudinal pattern as observed for an unweighted average of herbivory...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    33

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    33

Affiliations

  • University of Turku
    33
  • University of Helsinki
    8
  • Natural Resources Institute Finland
    4
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    4
  • National Institute of Amazonian Research
    2
  • University of Oulu
    2
  • Novia University of Applied Sciences
    2
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • Hólar University College
    1
  • University of Vic
    1