43 Works

How does increasing mast seeding frequency affect population dynamics of seed consumers? Wild boar as a case study

Laura Touzot, Eliane Schermer, Samuel Venner, Sylvain Delzon, Cyril Rousset, Eric Baubet, Jean-Michel Gaillard & Marlène Gamelon
Mast seeding in temperate oak populations shapes the dynamics of seed consumers and numerous communities. Mast seeding responds positively to warm spring temperatures and is therefore expected to increase under global warming. We investigated the potential effects of changes in oak mast seeding on wild boar population dynamics, a widespread and abundant consumer species. Using long-term monitoring data, we showed that abundant acorn production enhances the proportion of breeding females. With a body mass-structured population...

Opposing fitness consequences of habitat use in a harvested moose population

Endre Grüner Ofstad, Endre Ofstad, Stine Markussen, Bernt-Erik Sæther, Erling Johan Solberg, Morten Heim, Hallvard Haanes, Knut Røed & Ivar Herfindal
1. Landscape changes are happening at an unprecedented pace, and together with high levels of wildlife harvesting humans have a large effect on wildlife populations. A thorough knowledge of their combined influence on individual fitness is important in order to understand factors affecting population dynamics. 2. The goal of the study was to assess the individual consistency in the use of risky habitat types, and how habitat use was related to fitness components and life-history...

Phylogeny of the Norwegian flora

Ida M. Mienna, James D. M. Speed, Mika Bendiksby, Andrew H. Thornhill, Brent D. Mishler & Michael D. Martin
Abstract: Aim: In this study, we explored spatial patterns of phylogenetic diversity and endemism in the flora of Norway and tested hypothesized post-glacial environmental drivers of phylogenetic diversity, including temperature, precipitation, edaphic factors, and time since glacial retreat. Location: Norway. Taxon: Vascular plants (Trachaeophyta). Methods: We produced a multi-locus Maximum Likelihood (ML) phylogeny using a combination of newly produced DNA sequences from herbarium specimens and sequences available from public repositories. We combined the phylogeny with...

Plant census and microenvironment dataset from Mt. Baldy, Colorado, USA, 2014-2017

B. Blonder, R.E. Kapas, R.M. Dalton, B.J. Graae, J.M. Heiling & Ø.H. Opedal
The data comprise a long-term study of alpine plant community dynamics in the Gunnison National Forest of Colorado. The data comprise annual census data for all plants (including seedlings) in each of 50 2x2m plots, including information on size, reproduction, life stage, and mortality, with all plants identified and geo-located. These data are also made available transformed to provide individual-level estimates of growth, survival, fecundity, and recruitment. The dataset covers several thousand individuals of approximately...

Data from: Climate synchronises shrub growth across a high-arctic archipelago: contrasting implications of summer and winter warming

Mathilde Le Moullec, Lisa Sandal, Vidar Grøtan, Agata Buchwal & Brage Hansen
Climate change is most pronounced at high latitudes, where plant and animal populations are often strongly influenced by environmental fluctuations related to climate and weather. Environmental conditions can co-fluctuate over large distances and thereby synchronise primary production in space. However, large-scale studies of such spatiotemporal patterns remain rare in the Arctic, where short time-series and poor spatial replication have characterised the data available on both biotic and abiotic parameters. Here, we use dendrochronological tools to...

Data from: Norway and Sweden Green Roof (GF) plant data

Joel Lönnqvist, Hans Martin Hanslin & Birgitte Gisvold Johannessen
Standard succulent vegetation mixes developed mostly in temperate climates are being increasingly used on green roofs in different climate zones with uncertain outcome regarding vegetation survival and cover. We investigated vegetation on green roofs at nine temperate, cold and/or wet locations in Norway and Sweden covering wide ranges of latitude, mean annual temperature, annual precipitation, frequencies of freeze-thaw cycles and longest annual dry period. The vegetation on the roofs were surveyed in two consecutive years,...

Ecological mechanisms explaining interactions within plant-hummingbird networks: morphological matching increases towards lower latitudes

Jesper Sonne, Jeferson Vizentin-Bugoni, Pietro K. Maruyama, Andréa C. Araújo, Edgar Chávez-González, Aline G. Coelho, Peter A. Cotton, Oscar H. Marín-Gómez, Carlos Lara, Liliana R. Lasprilla, Caio G. Machado, Maria A. Maglianesi, Tiago S. Malucelli, Ana M. Martín-González, Genilda M. Oliveira, Paulo E. Oliveira, Raul Ortiz-Pulido, Márcia A. Rocca, Licléia C. Rodrigues, Ivan Sazima, Benno I. Simmons, Boris Tinoco, Isabela G. Varassin, Marcelo F. Vasconcelos, Bob O’Hara … & Bo Dalsgaard
Interactions between species are influenced by different ecological mechanisms, such as morphological matching, phenological overlap, and species abundances. How these mechanisms explain interaction frequencies across environmental gradients remains poorly understood. Consequently, we also know little about the mechanisms that drive the geographical patterns in network structure, such as complementary specialization and modularity. Here, we use data on morphologies, phenologies and abundances to explain interaction frequencies between hummingbirds and plants at a large geographic scale. For...

Data from: Herbivory and climate as drivers of woody plant growth: Do deer decrease the impacts of warming?

Katariina E. M. Vuorinen, Shaila J. Rao, Alison J. Hester & James D. M. Speed
Vegetation at ecotone transitions between open and forested areas is often heavily affected by two key processes: climate change and management of large herbivore densities. These both drive woody plant state-shifts, determining the location and the nature of the limit between open and tree or shrub-dominated landscapes. In order to adapt management to prevailing and future climate, we need to understand how browsing and climatic factors together affect the growth of plants at biome borders....

Zwölf Jahre Open Access an der Technisch-Naturwissenschaftlichen Universität Norwegens (NTNU): Der lange Weg zu wirksamen Richtlinien

Almuth Gastinger
Die Budapest Open Access-Initiative von 2002 wird oft als Startpunkt für die Open-Access-Bewegung angesehen. In Norwegen dauerte es länger, bevor sich Regierung, Universitäten und Forschungseinrichtungen aktiv mit diesem Thema beschäftigten. Das Ministerium für Bildung und Forschung erwähnte Open Access (OA) erstmalig in seinem Report no. 20 to the Storting (2004–2005). Aber erst 2017 wurden nationale OA-Richtlinien beschlossen. Am Beispiel von Norwegens Technisch-Naturwissenschaftlicher Universität wird aufgezeigt, wie strengere OA-Richtlinien mit den richtigen Anreizen bewirken, die Anzahl...

Using ecological context to interpret spatiotemporal variation in natural selection

Elena Albertsen, Elena Albertsen, Øystein Opedal, Geir Bolstad, Rocio Barrales, Thomas Hansen, Christophe Pelabon & W. Scott Armbruster
Spatiotemporal variation in natural selection is expected, but difficult to estimate. Pollinator-mediated selection on floral traits provides a good system for understanding and linking variation in selection to differences in ecological context. We studied pollinator-mediated selection in five populations of Dalechampia scandens (Euphorbiaceae) in Costa Rica and Mexico. Using a nonlinear path-analytical approach, we assessed several functional components of selection, and linked variation in pollinator-mediated selection across time and space to variation in pollinator assemblages....

Data from: Density-dependent adaptive topography in a small passerine bird, the collared flycatcher

Bernt-Erik Sæther, Steinar Engen, Lars Gustafsson, Vidar Grøtan & Stefan J.G. Vriend
The adaptive topography is a central concept in evolutionary biology, describing how the mean fitness of the population changes with gene frequencies or mean phenotypes. We use expected population size as quantity to be maximized by natural selection to show that selection on pairwise combinations of reproductive traits of collared flycatchers caused by fluctuations in population size generated an adaptive topography with distinct peaks often located at intermediate phenotypes. This occurred because r- and K-selection...

A genome-wide linkage map for the house sparrow (Passer domesticus) provides insights into the evolutionary history of the avian genome

Ingerid Hagen, Sigbjørn Lien, Anna Billing, Tore O. Elgvin, Cassandra Trier, Alina K. Niskanen, Maja Tarka, Jon Slate, Glenn-Peter Sætre & Henrik Jensen
The house sparrow is an important model species for studying physiological, ecological and evolutionary processes in wild populations. Here, we present a medium density, genome wide linkage map for house sparrow (Passer domesticus) that has aided the assembly of the house sparrow reference genome, and that will provide an important resource for ongoing mapping of genes controlling important traits in the ecology and evolution of this species. Using a custom house sparrow 10K iSelect Illumina...

High-arctic family planning: earlier spring onset advances age at first reproduction in barnacle geese

Kate Layton-Matthews, Mari Aas Fjelldal, Aline Magdalena Lee, Vidar Grøtan, Maarten J.J.E. Loonen & Brage Bremset Hansen
Quantifying how key life-history traits respond to climatic change is fundamental in understanding and predicting long-term population prospects. Age at first reproduction, which affects fitness and population dynamics, may be influenced by environmental stochasticity but has rarely been directly linked to climate change. Here, we use a case study from the highly seasonal and stochastic environment in high-arctic Svalbard, with strong temporal trends in breeding conditions, to test whether rapid climate warming may induce changes...

Data from: Consistent scaling of inbreeding depression in space and time in a house sparrow metapopulation

Alina K. Niskanen, Anna M. Billing, Håkon Holand, Ingerid J. Hagen, Yimen G. Araya-Ajoy, Arild Husby, Bernt Rønning, Ane Marlene Myhre, Peter Sjolte Ranke, Thomas Kvalnes, Henrik Pärn, Thor Harald Ringsby, Sigbjørn Lien, Bernt-Erik Sæther, Stefanie Muff & Henrik Jensen
Inbreeding may increase the extinction risk of small populations. Yet, studies using modern genomic tools to investigate inbreeding depression in nature have been limited to single populations, and little is known about the dynamics of inbreeding depression in subdivided populations over time. Natural populations often experience different environmental conditions and differ in demographic history and genetic composition; characteristics that can affect the severity of inbreeding depression. We utilised extensive long-term data on more than 3100...

Acclimation capacity and rate change through life in the zooplankton Daphnia

Tim Burton
When a change in the environment occurs, organisms can maintain an optimal phenotypic state via plastic, reversible changes to their phenotypes. These adjustments, when occurring within a generation, are described as the process of acclimation. Whilst acclimation has been studied for more than half a century, global environmental change has stimulated renewed interest in quantifying variation in the rate and capacity with which this process occurs, particularly among ectothermic organisms. Yet, despite the likely ecological...

Data from: Phylogenetic structure in the Sphagnum recurvum complex (Bryophyta: Sphagnaceae) relative to taxonomy and geography

Aaron Duffy, Blanka Aguero, Hans Stenoien, Kjell Ivar Flatberg, Michael S. Ignatov, Kristian Hassel & Jonathan Shaw
METHODS RADseq analyses were applied to a sample of 384 collections representing the European, North American, and (to a lesser extent) Asian ranges of the complex. The data were subjected to maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses and analyses of genetic structure using the software, STRUCTURE, and multivariate ordination approaches. RESULTS Defined phylogenetically, the S. recurvum complex includes S. angustifolium , S. fallax , S. flexuosum , S. pacificum , and S. recurvum , as distinct clades...

Collision between biological process and statistical analysis revealed by mean-centering

David Westneat, Yimen Araya-Ajoy, Hassen Allegue, Barbara Class, Niels Dingemanse, Ned Dochtermann, Laszlo Garamszegi, Julien Martin, Shinichi Nakagawa, Denis Reale & Holger Schielzeth
1. Animal ecologists often collect hierarchically-structured data and analyze these with linear mixed-effects models. Specific complications arise when the effect sizes of covariates vary on multiple levels (e.g., within vs among subjects). Mean-centering of covariates within subjects offers a useful approach in such situations, but is not without problems. 2. A statistical model represents a hypothesis about the underlying biological process. Mean-centering within clusters assumes that the lower level responses (e.g. within subjects) depend on...

Repeatable individual variation in migration timing in two anadromous salmonids and ecological consequences

Arne Johan Jensen, Bengt Finstad, Peder Fiske, Ola Håvard Diserud & Eva Bonsak Thorstad
Consistent individual differences in behaviour has been demonstrated for many animals, but there are few studies of consequences of such repeated behaviour in the wild. We tested consistency in migration timing to and from the sea among anadromous Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) and brown trout (Salmo trutta), using data from a study period of about 25 years, including more than 27,000 uniquely Carlin-tagged individuals that migrated to sea for feeding in the spring and returned...

Mobile Custom Silicone Mask Attack Dataset (CSMAD-Mobile)

Raghavendra Ramachandra, Sushma Venkatesh, Kiran B. Raja, Sushil Bhattacharjee, Pankaj Wasnik, Sébastien Marcel & Christoph Busch
CSMAD-Mobile is a dataset for mobile face recognition and presentation attack detection (anti-spoofing). The dataset contains face and silicon masks images captured with different smartphones. This dataset consists of images captured from 8 different Bona Fide subjects using three different smartphones (iPhone X, Samsung S7 and Samsung S8). For each subject within the database, varying number of samples are collected using all the three phones. Similarly, the silicone masks of each of the subject is...

Data from: Ecological impact assessments of alien species in Norway

Hanno Sandvik, Olga Hilmo, Snorre Henriksen, Reidar Elven, Per Arvid Åsen, Hanne Hegre, Oddvar Pedersen, Per Anker Pedersen, Heidi Solstad, Vigdis Vandvik, Kristine B. Westergaard, Frode Ødegaard, Sandra Åström, Hallvard Elven, Anders Endrestøl, Øivind Gammelmo, Bjørn Arild Hatteland, Halvor Solheim, Björn Nordén, Leif Sundheim, Venche Talgø, Tone Falkenhaug, Bjørn Gulliksen, Anders Jelmert, Eivind Oug … & Lisbeth Gederaas
Due to globalisation, trade and transport, the spread of alien species is increasing dramatically. Some alien species become ecologically harmful by threatening native biota. This can lead to irreversible changes in local biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, and, ultimately, to biotic homogenisation. We risk-assessed all alien plants, animals, fungi and algae, within certain delimitations, that are known to reproduce in Norway. Mainland Norway and the Arctic archipelago of Svalbard plus Jan Mayen were treated as separate...

Inter- and intraspecific trait variation shape multidimensional trait overlap between two plant invaders and the invaded communities

Kenny Helsen, Elisa Van Cleemput, Leonardo Bassi, Bente Graae, Ben Somers, Benjamin Blonder & Olivier Honnay
Invader success and ecosystem impact are both expected to be largely driven by the functional trait distinctiveness of the resident species relative to the invaded communities. To understand the importance of trait distinctiveness for plant invasions, and the native community’s trait response to the invasion, it is key to measure multiple traits simultaneously, and to incorporate intraspecific trait variation. Here we explored multidimensional patterns of inter- and intraspecific trait variation during the invasion of two...

Variation in the ontogenetic allometry of horn length in bovids along a body mass continuum

Morgane Tidière, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Mathieu Garel, Jean-François Lemaître, Carole Toïgo & Christophe Pélabon
Allometric relationships describe the proportional covariation between morphological, physiological, or life history traits and the size of the organisms. Evolutionary allometries estimated among species are expected to result from species differences in ontogenetic allometry, but it remains uncertain whether ontogenetic allometric parameters and particularly the ontogenetic slope can evolve. In bovids, the non-linear evolutionary allometry between horn length and body mass in males suggests systematic changes in ontogenetic allometry with increasing species body mass. To...

Data from: Resistance to gapeworm parasite has both additive and dominant genetic components in house sparrows, with evolutionary consequences for ability to respond to parasite challenge

Sarah Lundregan, Alina Niskanen, Stefanie Muff, Håkon Holand, Thomas Kvalnes, Thor-Harald Ringsby, Arild Husby & Henrik Jensen
Host parasite relationships are likely to change over the coming decades in response to climate change and increased anthropogenic stressors. Understanding the genetic architecture of parasite resistance will aid prediction of species’ responses to intensified parasite challenge. The gapeworm “Syngamus trachea” is prevalent in natural bird populations and causes symptomatic infections ranging from mild to severe. The parasite may affect ecological processes by curtailing bird populations and is important due to its propensity to spread...

Apparent breeding success drives long-term population dynamics of a migratory swan

Rascha Nuijten, Stefan Vriend, Kevin Wood, Trinus Haitjema, Eileen Rees, Eelke Jongejans & Bart Nolet
The ability of a species to adapt to environmental change is ultimately reflected in its vital rates – i.e., survival and reproductive success of individuals. Together, vital rates determine trends in numbers, commonly monitored using counts of species abundance. Rapid changes in abundance can give rise to concern, leading to calls for research into the biological mechanisms underlying variations in demography. For the NW European population of Bewick’s swan (Cygnus columbianus bewickii), there have been...

When does weather synchronise life history traits? Spatiotemporal patterns in juvenile body mass of two ungulates

Ivar Herfindal, Torkild Tveraa, Audun Stien, Erling Johan Solberg & Vidar Grøtan
1. Theory predicts that animal populations will be synchronised over large distances by weather and climatic conditions with high spatial synchrony. However, local variation in population responses to weather, and low synchrony in key weather variables or in other ecological processes may reduce the population synchrony. 2. We investigated to what extent temperature and precipitation during different periods of the year synchronised juvenile body mass of moose and reindeer in Norway. We expected high synchronising...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    43

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    42
  • Text
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Affiliations

  • Norwegian University of Science and Technology
    43
  • Norwegian Institute for Nature Research
    10
  • Norwegian University of Life Sciences
    6
  • University of Oslo
    4
  • Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research
    4
  • University of Oulu
    3
  • Lund University
    2
  • University of Groningen
    2
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    2
  • University of Zurich
    2