4 Works

Data from: Who shares? Who doesn’t? Factors associated with openly archiving raw research data

Heather A. Piwowar
Many initiatives encourage investigators to share their raw datasets in hopes of increasing research efficiency and quality. Despite these investments of time and money, we do not have a firm grasp of who openly shares raw research data, who doesn’t, and which initiatives are correlated with high rates of data sharing. In this analysis I use bibliometric methods to identify patterns in the frequency with which investigators openly archive their raw gene expression microarray datasets...

Data from: Extremely long-distance seed dispersal by an overfished Amazonian frugivore

Jill T. Anderson, Tim Nuttle, Joe S. Saldaña Rojas, Thomas H. Pendergast, Alexander S. Flecker, A. S. Flecker, J. T. Anderson, T. H. Pendergast & T. Nuttle
Throughout Amazonia, overfishing has decimated populations of fruit-eating fishes, especially the largebodied characid, Colossoma macropomum. During lengthy annual floods, frugivorous fishes enter vast Amazonian floodplains, consume massive quantities of fallen fruits and egest viable seeds. Many tree and liana species are clearly specialized for icthyochory, and seed dispersal by fish may be crucial for the maintenance of Amazonian wetland forests. Unlike frugivorous mammals and birds, little is known about seed dispersal effectiveness of fishes. Extensive...

Data from: Public sharing of research datasets: a pilot study of associations

Heather A. Piwowar & Wendy W. Chapman
The public sharing of primary research datasets potentially benefits the research community but is not yet common practice. In this pilot study, we analyzed whether data sharing frequency was associated with funder and publisher requirements, journal impact factor, or investigator experience and impact. Across 397 recent biomedical microarray studies, we found investigators were more likely to publicly share their raw dataset when their study was published in a high-impact journal and when the first or...

Data from: Behavioral types of predator and prey jointly determine prey survival: potential implications for the maintenance of within species behavioral variation

Jonathan N. Pruitt, John J. Stachowicz & Andrew Sih
Recent studies in animal behavior have emphasized the ecological importance of individual variation in behavioral types (e.g. boldness, activity). Such studies have emphasized how variation in one species affects its interaction with other species. But few (if any) studies simultaneously examine variation in multiple interacting species, despite the potential for coevolutionary responses to work to either maintain or eliminate variation in interacting populations. Here, we investigate how individual differences in behavioral types of both predators...

Registration Year

  • 2011
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • University of Pittsburgh
    4
  • Duke University
    1
  • Indiana University of Pennsylvania
    1
  • Cornell University
    1
  • University of California, Davis
    1