42 Works

An animal without a mitochondrial genome: the salmon parasite Henneguya salminicola (Cnidaria: Myxozoa)

Dorothée Huchon, Dayana Yahalomi, Stephen D. Atkinson, Moran Neuhof, E. Sally Chang, Hervé Philippe, Paulyn Cartwright & Jerri L. Bartholomew
Although aerobic respiration is a hallmark of eukaryotes, a few unicellular lineages, growing in hypoxic environments, have secondarily lost this ability. In the absence of oxygen, the mitochondria of these organisms have lost all or parts of their genomes and evolved into mitochondria related organelles (MROs). There has been debate regarding the presence of MROs in animals. Using deep sequencing approaches, we discovered that a member of the Cnidaria, the myxozoan Henneguya salminicola, has no...

Data for Analysis of Keystone Predation - trait based or driven by extrinsic processes?

Bruce Menge, Melissa Foley, Matthew Robart, Erin Richmond, Mae Noble & Francis Chan
Keystone predation can be a determinant of community structure, including species diversity, but factors underlying “keystoneness” have been minimally explored. Using the system in which the original keystone, the sea star Pisaster ochraceus, was discovered, we focused on two potential (but overlapping) determinants of keystoneness: intrinsic traits or state variables of the species (e.g., size, density), and extrinsic environmental parameters (e.g., prey productivity) that may provide conditions favorable for keystone predator evolution. Using a comparative-experimental...

Data from: Climate drives the geography of marine consumption by changing predator communities

Matthew Whalen, Ross Whippo & Emmett Duffy
The global distribution of primary production and consumption by humans (fisheries) is well-documented, but we have no map linking the central ecological process of consumption within food webs to temperature and other ecological drivers. Using standardized assays that span 105° of latitude on four continents, we show that rates of bait consumption by generalist predators in shallow marine ecosystems are tightly linked to both temperature and the composition of consumer assemblages. Unexpectedly, rates of consumption...

Data from: Biogeography of ocean acidification: differential field performance of transplanted mussels to upwelling-driven variation in carbonate chemistry

Bruce Menge, Francis Chan, Jeremy Rose, Eric Sanford, Peter Raimondi, Carol Blanchette & Tarik Gouhier
Ocean acidification (OA) represents a serious challenge to marine ecosystems. Laboratory studies addressing OA indicate broadly negative effects for marine organisms, particularly those relying on calcification processes. Growing evidence also suggests OA combined with other environmental stressors may be even more deleterious. Scaling these laboratory studies to ecological performance in the field, where environmental heterogeneity may mediate responses, is a critical next step toward understanding OA impacts on natural communities. We leveraged an upwelling-driven pH...

Data from: Big fishery, big data, and little crabs: using genomic methods to examine the seasonal recruitment patterns of early life stage Dungeness crab (Cancer magister) in the California current ecosystem

Elizabeth Lee
The California Current Ecosystem (CCE) is a dynamic marine ecosystem from which many socioeconomically important fisheries species are harvested. Here, a genotypingby-sequencing (GBS) approach was used to examine genomic variation in an early life stage (megalopae) of the Dungeness crab (Cancer magister), which constitutes the most valuable single-species commercial fishery in the CCE. Variation in abundance and timing of megalopae recruitment has been extensively studied for over two decades in Coos Bay, Oregon, United States....

Data from: Increased diversity and concordant shifts in community structure of coral-associated Symbiodiniaceae and bacteria subjected to chronic human disturbance

Danielle Claar, Jamie McDevitt-Irwin, Melissa Garren, Rebecca Vega Thurber, Ruth Gates & Julia Baum
Coral-associated bacteria and endosymbiotic algae (Symbiodiniaceae spp.) are both vitally important for the biological function of corals. Yet little is known about their co-occurrence within corals, how their diversity varies across coral species, or how they are impacted by anthropogenic disturbances. Here, we sampled coral colonies (n = 472) from seven species, encompassing a range of life history traits, across a gradient of chronic human disturbance (n = 11 sites on Kiritimati (Christmas) atoll) in...

Pervasive mitonuclear coadaptation underlies fast development in interpopulation hybrids of a marine crustacean

Kin-Lan Han & Felipe Barreto
Cellular energy production requires coordinated interactions between genetic components from the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. This coordination results in coadaptation of interacting elements within populations. Interbreeding between divergent gene pools can disrupt coadapted loci and result in hybrid fitness breakdown. While specific incompatible loci have been detected in mutiple eukaryotic taxa, the extent of the nuclear genome that is influenced by mitonuclear coadaptation is not clear in any species. Here, we used F2 hybrids between...

Patterns of annual and seasonal immune investment in a temporal reproductive opportunist

Elizabeth Schultz, Christian Gunning, Jamie Cornelius, Dustin Reichard, Kirk Klasing & Thomas Hahn
Historically, investigations of how organismal investments in immunity fluctuate in response to environmental and physiological changes have focused on seasonally breeding organisms that confine reproduction to seasons with relatively unchallenging environmental conditions and abundant resources. The red crossbill, Loxia curvirostra, is a songbird that can breed opportunistically if conifer seeds are abundant, on both short, cold, and long, warm days, providing an ideal system to investigate environmental and reproductive effects on immunity. In this study,...

A multi-species approach to manage effects of land cover and weather on upland game birds

Alexander Schindler, David Haukos, Christian Hagen & Beth Ross
Loss and degradation of grasslands in the Great Plains region has resulted in major declines in abundance of grassland bird species. To ensure future viability of grassland bird populations, it is crucial to evaluate specific effects of environmental factors among species to determine drivers of population decline and develop effective conservation strategies. We used threshold models to quantify effects of land cover and weather changes on lesser and greater prairie-chickens (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus and T. cupido,...

Heat shock improves random spore analysis in diverse strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Molly Burke, Kaitlin McHugh & Ian Kutch
Random spore analysis (RSA) is a classic method in yeast genetics that allows high-throughput purification of recombinant haploid spores following specific crosses. RSA typically involves a number of steps to induce sporulation, purge vegetative cells that fail to sporulate, and disrupt the ascus walls of sporulated cells to release haploid spores. These steps generally require expensive chemicals and/or enzymes that kill diploid cells but have few effects on spores. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomcyes pombe,...

Data from: Patterns of annual and seasonal immune investment in a temporal reproductive opportunist

Elizabeth Schultz, Christian Gunning, Jamie Cornelius, Dustin Reichard, Kirk Klasing & Thomas Hahn
Historically, investigations of how organismal investments in immunity fluctuate in response to environmental and physiological changes have focused on seasonally breeding organisms that confine reproduction to seasons with mild environmental conditions and abundant resources. The red crossbill, Loxia curvirostra, is a songbird that can breed opportunistically if conifer seeds are abundant, on both short, cold, and long, warm days, providing an ideal system to investigate interactions between immunity, reproduction, and environmental fluctuations. In this study,...

Data from: Depth dependent dive kinematics suggest cost-efficient foraging strategies by tiger sharks

Samantha Andrzejaczek, Adrian Gleiss, Karissa Lear, Charitha Pattiaratchi, Taylor Chapple & Mark Meekan
Tiger sharks Galeocerdo cuvier are a keystone, top-order predator that are assumed to engage in cost-efficient movement and foraging patterns. To investigate the extent to which patterns of oscillatory diving by these animals conform to these patterns, we used a biologging approach to model their cost of transport. High-resolution biologging tags with tri-axial sensors were deployed on 21 tiger sharks at Ningaloo Reef for durations of 5-48 hours. Using overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA) as...

Data from: Passive acoustic monitoring effectively detects Northern Spotted Owls and Barred Owls over a range of forest conditions

Leila S. Duchac, Damon B. Lesmeister, Katie M. Dugger, Zachary J. Ruff & Raymond J. Davis
Passive acoustic monitoring using autonomous recording units (ARUs) is a fast-growing area of wildlife research especially for rare, cryptic species that vocalize. Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) populations have been monitored since the mid-1980s using mark-recapture methods. To evaluate an alternative survey method, we used ARUs to detect calls of Northern Spotted Owls and Barred Owls (S. varia), a congener that has expanded its range into the Pacific Northwest and threatens Northern Spotted Owl...

Data from: Repetitive DNA profiles reveal evidence of rapid genome evolution and reflect species boundaries in ground beetles

John Sproul, Lindsey Barton & David Maddison
Genome architecture is a complex, multidimensional property of an organism defined by the content and spatial organization of the genome’s component parts. Comparative study of entire genome architecture in model organisms is shedding light on mechanisms underlying genome regulation, evolution, and diversification; but such studies require costly analytical approaches which make extensive comparative study impractical for most groups. However, lower-cost methods that measure a single architectural component (e.g., distribution of one class of repeats) have...

Genetic diversity and population structure in Chrysolepis chrysophylla (golden chinquapin; Fagaceae): SSRs vs SNPs

Ann Willyard, Andrew Bower, Valerie Hipkins, Jacob Snelling & Jennifer DeWoody
Simple sequence repeat (SSR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes on the same plant samples of Chrysolepis chrysophylla (Fagaceae; golden chinquapin) from 22 sites were used to determine genetic diversity and population structure. One site of C. sempervirens allowed interspecific vs. intraspecific comparison. SSRs and SNPs yielded many similar results. Among-site variation contributed 13% to 17% of the genetic variation and Fst estimates of 0.14 to 0.17 were in the range expected among Fagaceae species...

Multiscale analysis of canopy arthropod diversity in a volcanically fragmented landscape

Elske K. Tielens, Maile N. Neel, Devin R. Leopold, Christian P. Giardina & Daniel S. Gruner
Dataset and code associated with the article "Multiscale analysis of canopy arthropod diversity in a volcanically fragmented landscape" (Tielens et al 2019, Ecosphere). Article abstract: Habitat fragmentation resulting in habitat loss and increased isolation is a dominant driver of global species declines. Habitat isolation and connectivity vary across scales, and understanding how con- nectivity affects biodiversity can be challenging because the relevant scale depends on the taxa involved. A multiscale analysis can provide insight in...

Greater Sage-grouse nest bowls buffer microclimate in a post-megafire landscape although effects on nest survival are marginal

Christopher Anthony
Temperature at fine spatial scales is an important driver of nest site selection for many avian species during the breeding season and can influence nest success. Sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) communities have areas with high levels of vegetation heterogeneity and high thermal variation; however, fire removes vegetation that provides protection from predators and extreme environmental conditions. To examine the influence of microclimates on Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) nest site selection and nest success in a fire...

Shards, sequences, and shorelines: two new species of Bembidion from North America (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

David Maddison
Two new species of Bembidion are described from river shores in North America. One, Bembidion mimbres sp. nov., from the Gila River watershed in the lands of the Mimbres culture in New Mexico and Arizona, is closely related to the widespread Bembidion levigatum. DNA sequences from several linkage groups provide evidence of the distinctiveness of B. mimbres. The second, Bembidion corgenoma sp. nov., has been the subject of recent genomic and transcriptomic studies. It belongs...

Sitticine jumping spiders: phylogeny, classification and chromosomes (Araneae: Salticidae: Sitticini)

Wayne Maddison, David Maddison, Shahan Derkarabetian & Marshal Hedin
We review the systematics of sitticine jumping spiders, with a focus on the Palearctic and Nearctic regions, in order to revise their generic classification, clarify the species of one region (Canada), and study their chromosomes. A genome-wide molecular phylogeny of 23 sitticine species, using more than 700 loci from the arachnid Ultra-Conserved Element (UCE) probeset, confirms the Neotropical origins of sitticines, whose basal divergence separates the new subtribe Aillutticina (a group of 5 Neotropical genera)...

Co-infection best predicts respiratory viral infection in a wild host

Caroline Glidden, Courtney Coon, Brianna Beechler, Chase McNulty, Vanessa Ezenwa & Anna Jolles
1) The dynamics of directly transmitted pathogens in natural populations are likely to result from the combined effects of host traits, pathogen biology and interactions among pathogens within a host. Discovering how these factors work in concert to shape variation in pathogen dynamics in natural host – multi‐pathogen systems is fundamental to understanding population health. 2) Here, we describe temporal variation in incidence and then elucidate the effect of hosts trait, season, and pathogen co‐occurrence...

Transcriptome-wide comparisons and virulence gene polymorphisms of host-associated genotypes of the cnidarian parasite Ceratonova shasta in salmonids

Gema Alama Bermejo, Eli Meyer, Stephen Douglas Atkinson, Astrid Sibylle Holzer, Monika Wiśniewska, Martin Kolisko & Jerri Lee Bartholomew
Ceratonova shasta is an important myxozoan pathogen affecting the health of salmonid fishes in the Pacific Northwest of North America. C. shasta exists as a complex of host-specific genotypes, some with low to moderate virulence, and one that causes a profound, lethal infection in susceptible hosts. High throughput sequencing methods are powerful tools for discovering the genetic basis of these host/virulence differences, but deep sequencing of myxozoans has been challenging due to extremely fast molecular...

Endocrine disruptors cause multigenerational and transgenerational epigenetic changes in fish exposed during early life

Susanne Brander, Kaley Major, Bethany DeCourten, Jie Li, Monica Britton, Alvine Mehinto, Richard Connon & Matthew Settles
The inland silverside, Menidia beryllina, is a euryhaline fish and a model organism in ecotoxicology. We previously showed that exposure to picomolar (ng/L) levels of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can cause a variety of effects in M. beryllina, from changes in gene expression to phenotypic alterations. Here we explore the potential for early life exposure to EDCs to modify the epigenome in silversides, with a focus on multi- and transgenerational effects. EDCs included contaminants of...

Independent losses of the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) pathway within Crustacea

Allie Graham & Felipe Barreto
Metazoans respond to hypoxic stress via the Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF) pathway, a mechanism thought to be extremely conserved due to its importance in monitoring cellular oxygen levels and regulating responses to hypoxia. However, recent work revealed that key members of the HIF pathway have been lost in specific lineages (a tardigrade and a copepod), suggesting alternative mechanisms have evolved but are still undescribed. Using genomic and transcriptomic data from 70 different species across 12...

Genetic diversity and connectivity of southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) found in the Brazil and Chile–Peru wintering grounds and the South Georgia (Islas Georgias del Sur) feeding ground

Emma L Carroll, Paulo Ott, Louise McMillan, Bárbara Galletti Vernazzani, Petra Neveceralova, Els Vermeulen, Oscar Gaggiotti, Artur Andriolo, C. Scott Baker, Connor Bamford, Peter Best, Elsa Cabrera, Susannah Calderan, Andrea Chirife, Rachel M. Fewster, Paulo A. C. Flores, Timothy Frasier, Thales R. O. Freitas, Karina Groch, Pavel Hulva, Amy Kennedy, Russell Leaper, Mathew S. Leslie, Michael Moore, Larissa Oliviera … & Jennifer A Jackson
As species recover from exploitation, continued assessments of connectivity and population structure are warranted to provide information for conservation and management. This is particularly true in species with high dispersal capacity, such as migratory whales, where patterns of connectivity could change rapidly. Here we build on a previous long-term, large-scale collaboration on southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) to combine new (nnew) and published (npub) mitochondrial (mtDNA) and microsatellite genetic data from all major wintering grounds...

Data from: Introduced beaver improve growth of non–native trout in Tierra del Fuego, South America

Ivan Arismendi, Brooke Penaluna & Carlos Jara
Species introductions threaten ecosystem function worldwide and interactions among introduced species may amplify their impacts. Effects of multiple invasions are still poorly studied and often the mechanisms underlying potential interactions among invaders are unknown. Despite being a remote and well–conserved area, the southern portion of South America has been greatly impacted by invasions of both the American Beaver (Castor canadensis) and Brown Trout (Salmo trutta fario). Here, we compared growth, condition, diet, and stable isotopes...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    42

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    42

Affiliations

  • Oregon State University
    42
  • Stanford University
    3
  • University of California, Davis
    3
  • University of Washington
    2
  • University of Pretoria
    2
  • University of Georgia
    2
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    2
  • Ohio Wesleyan University
    2
  • National Marine Fisheries Service
    2
  • US Forest Service
    2