20,694 Works

Sequences alignments and morphological data

Peter Hosner, Joseph Tobias, Edward Braun & Rebecca Kimball
NEXUS and PHYLIP format .txt files for concatenated UCE alignments. NEXUS format .txt files for individual UCE alignments. CSV format .txt file with summary morphological data, NEWICK format tree files, and R script used in comparative analyses.

Data for Experiment 1 of Magid, Sarkol and Mesoudi (2017)

Kesson Magid, Vera Sarkol & Alex Mesoudi
Data for Experiment 1 of Magid, Sarkol and Mesoudi (2017) Experimental priming of independent and interdependent activity does not affect culturally-variable psychological processes. Royal Society Open Science. See README file for variable descriptions.

Dataset for analyses of patterns of mislabeling of the Shannon-Wiener diversity index

Martin Šigut, Hana Šigutová, Petr Pyszko, Aleš Dolný, Michaela Drozdová & Pavel Drozd
Data of 2098 papers mentioning Shannon-Wiener (S-Wi), Shannon-Weaver (S-We) or both names concurrently (S-Wi + S-We) between 1990-2015, downloaded from Web of Science database. Metadata of every paper originally included authors' names, title, journal and year of publishing, database accession number, first author's address, and affiliation to focal research area(s). We added information concerning research type (applied vs basic), affiliation to country and region of origin, if the first author is a native or non-native...

Data from: Coevolution of competing Callosobruchus species does not stabilize coexistence

Stephen J. Hausch, Jeremy W. Fox & Steven M. Vamosi
Interspecific resource competition is expected to select for divergence in resource use, weakening interspecific relative to intraspecific competition, thus promoting stable coexistence. More broadly, because interspecific competition reduces fitness, any mechanism of interspecific competition should generate selection favoring traits that weaken interspecific competition. However, species also can adapt to competition by increasing their competitive ability, potentially destabilizing coexistence. We reared two species of bean beetles, the specialist Callosobruchus maculatus and the generalist C. chinensis, in...

Raw data

Stephen J. Hausch, Jeremy Fox & Steven M. Vamosi
Raw data

R code output

Stephen J. Hausch, Jeremy Fox & Steven M. Vamosi
R code output

Data from: The diet of a nocturnal pelagic predator, the Bulwer’s petrel, across the lunar cycle

S. Waap, W. O. C. Symondson, J. P. Granadeiro, H. Alonso, C. Serra-Gonçalves, M. P. Dias & P. Catry
The lunar cycle is believed to strongly influence the vertical distribution of many oceanic taxa, with implications for the foraging behaviour of nocturnal marine predators. Most studies to date testing lunar effects on foraging have focused on predator activity at-sea, with some birds and marine mammals demonstrating contrasting behavioural patterns, depending on the lunar-phase. However, to date no study has focused on how the lunar cycle might actually affect predator-prey interactions in the upper layers...

Data from: Thin Al1-xGaxAs0.56Sb0.44 diodes with extremely weak temperature dependence of avalanche breakdown

Xinxin Zhou, Chee Hing Tan, Shiyong Zhang, Manuel Moreno, Shiyu Xie, Salman Abdullah & Jo Shien Ng
This file includes all the raw data for figures in Manuscript (Thin Al1-xGaxAs0.56Sb0.44 diodes with extremely weak temperature dependence of avalanche breakdown) submitted to Royal Society Open Science.

Data from: Root morphology and mycorrhizal type strongly influence root production in nutrient hot spots of mixed forests

Weile Chen, Roger T. Koide & David M. Eissenstat
1. Plants compete for nutrients using a range of strategies. We investigated nutrient foraging within nutrient hot-spots simultaneously available to plant species with diverse root traits. We hypothesized that there would be more root proliferation by thin-root species than by thick-root species, and that root proliferation by thin-root species would limit root proliferation by thick-root species. 2. We conducted a root ingrowth experiment in a temperate forest in eastern USA where root systems of different...

Genotypes Scenario 1, Peripheral Population 1

Yolanda Melero, Matthew K. Oliver & X Lambin
Simulation data composed of the genotypes for the initial peripheral population 1 (IP0 1) in Scenario 1

Genotypes Scenario 3, Population Dee

Yolanda Melero, Matthew Oliver & X Lambin
Simulation data composed of the genotypes for the initial Dee population (P0 Dee) in Scenario 3

Probabilistic selection task data_ Exp1A_Fig2a_Fig3a

Iris Schutte, Heleen A. Slagter, Anne G. E. Collins, Michael J. Frank & J. Leon Kenemans
Data corresponds to experiment 1A and Figure 2A/3A.

Reaction time data_ Exp2_Fig5_Schutte_etal

Iris Schutte, Heleen A. Slagter, Anne G. E. Collins, Michael J. Frank & J. Leon Kenemans
Data corresponds to Experiment 2 and Figure 5

StutzBolnickData

Daniel Bolnick & William Stutz
Data to recreate results, including genotype scores and parasite infection and geographic locations.

MHC_master

Daniel Bolnick & William Stutz

Data from: Integrating local knowledge and research to refine the management of an invasive non-native grass in critically endangered grassy woodlands

Jennifer Firn, Emma Ladouceur & Josh Dorrough
1. Globally the prevalence and impact of invasive non-native plant species is increasing rapidly. Experimentally-based research aimed at supporting management is limited in its ability to keep up with this pace, partly because of the importance of understanding historical abiotic and biotic conditions. Contrastingly, landholders are in unique positions to witness species turnover in grasslands, adapt management practices in response, and learn from successes and failures. 2. This local knowledge could be crucial for identifying...

Franugla_cpDNA_Dat

Eva Mosner, Klaus Eimert, Ulrike Hüwe, Birgit Ziegenhagen, Alwin Janßen & Ilona Leyer
cpDNA data: nucleotide sequences at 8 differentiating loci in two chloroplast regions observed in 236 individuals from 30 populations (as described in Methods & Materials, Table 1, Fig. 6 and Supplementary Material).

Data from: A Mesoamerican origin of cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.). Implications for the conservation of plant genetic resources

Nerea Larranaga, Federico J. Albertazzi, Gustavo Fontecha, Margarita Palmieri, Heimo Rainer, Maarten Van Zonneveld & Jose I Hormaza
Knowledge on the structure and distribution of genetic diversity is a key aspect in order to plan and execute an efficient conservation and utilization of the genetic resources of any crop as well as for determining historical demographic inferences. In this work, a large data set of 1765 accessions of cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill, Annonaceae), an underutilized fruit tree crop native to the neotropics and used as a food source by pre-Columbian cultures, was collected...

Translational velocity in response to spatially separated target signal and masker presented at different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs).

Norman Lee & Andrew C. Mason
The target signal was presented at 76 dB SPL while the masker intensity was varied to achieve three SNRs (-6, 0, +6 dB). Masker presentation started and ended 0.5 and 4.5 seconds after the onset of data acquisition respectively. Signal presentation started and ended 1.0 and 4.0 seconds after the onset of data acquisition, respectively. Data plotted in figure 4A (right).

Steering velocity in response to spatially separated target signal and masker presented at different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs)

Norman Lee & Andrew C. Mason
The target signal was presented at 76 dB SPL while the masker intensity was varied to achieve three SNRs (-6, 0, +6 dB). Masker presentation started and ended 0.5 and 4.5 seconds after the onset of data acquisition respectively. Signal presentation started and ended 1.0 and 4.0 seconds after the onset of data acquisition, respectively. Data plotted in figure 4B (right).

Virtual walking path in response to spatially grouped target signal and masker presented at equal intensity.

Norman Lee & Andrew C. Mason
The target signal was presented at 76 dB SPL from a forward speaker while the masker was presented at the same intensity from an adjacent speaker to the right. ‘X’ and ‘Y’ coordinates of virtual walking paths measured from the trackball system. Data plotted in figure 5B.

Virtual walking path in response to spatially grouped target signal and maskers presented at equal intensity.

Norman Lee & Andrew C. Mason
The target signal was presented at 76 dB SPL from a forward speaker while two coherent maskers were presented at the same combined intensity from adjacent speakers to the left and right of the signal speaker. ‘X’ and ‘Y’ coordinates of virtual walking paths measured from the trackball system. Data plotted in figure 5D.

Virtual walking path in response to spatially grouped target signal and maskers presented at equal intensity

Norman Lee & Andrew C. Mason
The target signal was presented at 76 dB SPL from a forward speaker while two coherent maskers werepresented at the same combined intensity from lateral speakers to the left and right of the signal speaker. ‘X’ and ‘Y’ coordinates of virtual walking paths measured from the trackball system. Data plotted in figure 5G.

SSH front locations 1999

Christopher Chapman
Southern Ocean front locations obtained from AVISO gridded SSH using the WHOSE method.

SSH front locations 2002

Christopher Chapman
Southern Ocean front locations obtained from AVISO gridded SSH using the WHOSE method.

Registration Year

  • 2017
    20,694

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    20,693
  • Text
    1

Affiliations

  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    112
  • University of Oxford
    76
  • University of Zurich
    73
  • University of Florida
    68
  • Uppsala University
    67
  • University of Minnesota
    61
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
    61
  • University of Toronto
    61
  • Cornell University
    45
  • University of Melbourne
    44