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Method for Object-Based Diagnostic Evaluation

Randy Bullock, Barbara Brown & Tressa Fowler
This technical note discusses the Method for Object-Based Diagnostic Evaluation (MODE), which is part of the Model Evaluation Tools (MET) verification software package. MODE is an implementation of one approach to object-based verification (we’ll discuss what this means shortly). Working with objects is more intuitive for most forecast users and providers than working with traditional verification statistics such as Probability of Detection (POD) or False Alarm Ratio (FAR). It allows statements about (for example) size,...

Fourth Annual Progress Report for a SOST Near-Term Priority: Assessing Meridional Overturning Circulation Variability: Implications for Rapid Climate Change

W. Johns, P. Chang, G. Danabasoglu, P. Heimbach, Y. Kushnir, Y. Kwon, M. Patterson, S. Lozier, J. Willis & R. Zhang
The report is the fourth annual progress report submitted by the U.S. AMOC Science Team. The purpose of this report is to summarize progress on the main objectives of the program, identify any programmatic gaps, and make recommendations on near‐term research priorities for the program.

A Tutorial for Using 'Rmpi' on the NCAR/Wyoming Supercomputer

Nathan Lenssen, Douglas Nychka, Dorit Hammerling & Seth McGinnis
The recent growth in the size and complexity of climate data as well as the availability of cluster and supercomputing resources has brought parallel programming to the attention of geostatisticans. The National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR) supercomputer facility is an accessible and powerful resource for any scientist or statistician working in climate-related fields. This technical report presents a tutorial for users of the statistical language R to quickly utilize the massively parallel computational resources...

International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (ICOADS) Release 3, Monthly Summaries

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The International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (ICOADS) is a global ocean marine meteorological and surface ocean dataset. It is formed by merging many national and international data sources that contain measurements and visual observations from ships (merchant, navy, research), moored and drifting buoys, coastal stations, and other marine platforms. The coverage is global and sampling density varies depending on date and geographic position relative to shipping routes and ocean observing systems. The monthly summary time...

LatticeKrig: Multiresolution Kriging based on Markov random fields

Douglas Nychka, Dorit Hammerling, Stephan Sain & Nathan Lenssen
Methods for the interpolation of large spatial datasets. This package follows a "fixed rank Kriging" approach using a large number of basis functions and provides spatial estimates that are comparable to standard families of covariance functions. Using a large number of basis functions allows for estimates that can come close to interpolating the observations (a spatial model with a small nugget variance.) Moreover, the covariance model for this method can approximate the Matern covariance family...

The Sun4Cast® Solar Power Forecasting System: The Result of the Public-Private-Academic Partnership to Advance Solar Power Forecasting

Sue Ellen Haupt, Branko Kosovic, Tara Jensen, Jared Lee, Pedro Jimenez Munoz, Jeffrey Lazo, James Cowie, Tyler McCandless, Julia Pearson, Gerry Wiener, Stefano Alessandrini, Luca Delle Monache, Dantong Yu, Zhenzhou Peng, Dong Huang, John Heiser, Shinjae Yoo, Paul Kalb, Steven Miller, Matthew Rogers & Laura Hinkleman
The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) led a partnership to advance the state-of-the-science of solar power forecasting by designing, developing, building, deploying, testing, and assessing the Sun4Cast® Solar Power Forecasting System. The project included cutting-edge research, testing in several geographically and climatologically diverse high penetration solar utilities and ISOs, and wide dissemination of the research results to raise the bar on solar power forecasting technology. The partners included three other national laboratories, six universities,...

U.S. CLIVAR Atlantic Implementation Plan

This document describes what the U.S. CLIVAR Scientific Steering Committeee hoped to achieve between 2000 and 2010 in observing and understanding the phenomena of climate variability in and around the Atlantic basin in support of Atlantic CLIVAR programs; it sets out a prioritized and integrated plan for sustained observations, and modeling and theoretical investigations of the atmosphere-ocean-land coupled system.

Review of U.S. CLIVAR Pilot Climate Process Teams, and Recommendations for Future Climate Process Teams

Climate Process Teams (CPTs) were initiated by U.S. CLIVAR in 2003 with funding from NSF and NOAA in order to facilitate the transfer of new understanding gained through field experiments and process modeling into improvements in climate models. The purpose of this document is to review the achievements, legacies, and challenges of the three pilot CPTs and provide guidelines for a future round of CPTs.

U.S. CLIVAR ENSO Diversity Workshop Report

Understanding of ENSO diversity is still limited, and the existence of specific “precursors” to the different flavors is unclear. This
 report p
resents 
a 
synthesis 
of 
the 
results along 
with 
major outstanding
 issues
 highlighted at 
the
 2012 ENSO Diversity Workshop.

A Science and Implementation Plan for EPIC: An Eastern Pacific Investigation of Climate Processes in the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere System

R. Weller
This document describes The Eastern Pacific Investigation of Climate processes (EPIC) in the ocean-atmosphere--a five-year process study to improve the understanding of the intertropical convergence zone, to observe and understand the ocean-atmosphere processes, and to observe and understand properties of the extensive boundary layer cloud decks in the southeasterly tradewind and cross-equatorial flow regime.

U.S. CLIVAR Pan-American Implementation Plan

This document summarizes a prioritzed plan for the U.S. CLIVAR Pan-American Climate Studies Program that encompasses a broad range of activities that include empirical and modeling studies, as well as the development and analysis of historical datasets to arrive at a better understanding and simulation of the phenomena that control the seasonal rainfall patterns and their variability on seasonal-to-decadal timescales.

U.S. CLIVAR 2009 Summit Report

This report summarizes presentations and discussion during the U.S. CLIVAR 2009 Summit, including the Panel breakout sessions.

2014 U.S. AMOC Science Team Annual Report on Progress and Priorities

G. Danabasoglu, R. Curry, A. Karspeck, C. Meinen, R. Msadek, M. Patterson, R. Perez, A. Schmittner, L. Thompson & S. Yeager
The seventh annual report for the U.S. AMOC Science Team features progress made in the past year on the main objectives of the program, identifies programmatic gaps, and makes recommendations on near and long-term research priorities and goals for the program. Over 50 research projects are featured in the report. Furthermore, the report lists action items for each Task Team to address, which are based upon the discussions from the 2014 Annual Science Team meeting...

U.S. CLIVAR Hurricane Workshop Report

The report summarizes the June 2013 workshop on the analyses of climate model experiments coordinated by the U.S. CLIVAR Hurricane Working Group to improve understanding of interannual variability and trends in tropical cyclone activity from the beginning of the 20th century to present and to quantify changes in the characteristics of tropical cyclones in a warming climate.

2014 U.S. CLIVAR Summit Report

This report summarizes presentations and discussion during the U.S. CLIVAR 2014 Summit, including the Panel breakout sessions.

THESIS Population Exposure Tool

Claudia Tebaldi
This tool computes heatwave days at each grid cell of the global land region over the Community Earth System Model (CESM) grid and matches population counts at the same spatial scale to compute population exposure to heatwaves, measured in units of person-day.

NCEP Climate Forecast System Version 2 (CFSv2) Monthly Products

Suranjana Saha, Shrinivas Moorthi, Xingren Wu, Jiande Wang, Sudhir Nadiga, Patrick Tripp, David Behringer, Yu-Tai Hou, Hui-Ya Chuang, Mark Iredell, Michael Ek, Jesse Meng, Rongqian Yang, Malaquias Pena Mendez, Huug Van Den Dool, Qin Zhang, Wanqiu Wang, Mingyue Chen & Emily Becker
The National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System (CFS) is initialized four times per day (0000, 0600, 1200, and 1800 UTC). NCEP upgraded their operational CFS to version 2 on March 30, 2011. This is the same model that was used to create the NCEP Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR). CFSv2 monthly atmospheric, oceanic and land surface output products are available at 0.3, 0.5, 1.0, 1.9, and 2.5 degree horizontal resolutions as 6-hourly...

U.S. CLIVAR Position Paper, International CLIVAR Conference, UNESCO, Paris, December 2-4, 1998

This document highlights the U.S. CLIVAR position as it will contribute to the International CLIVAR mission with research in these specific areas: global seasonal-to-interannual predictability, decadal modulation of ENSO, Atlantic climate variability, anthropogenic climate change, African climate variability, Southern Ocean thermohaline circulation, climate modeling, sustained observations of climate and atmospheric and oceanic changes, and dataset development.

Climate Process Modeling and Science Teams (CPTs): Implementation and Initial Foci

This document provides the scientific motivation for Climate Process Teams to organize in response to the U.S. CLIVAR recommended pilot-phase implementation.

Observing and modeling climate variability in the Intra-Americas Seas and impacts on the continental Americas and the Caribbean

, , Yolande Serra, German Poveda, Erick Rivera Fernandez & Mike Patterson
This report highlights the virtual workshop that was held over three half-day sessions (September 9-11, 2015) and featured 47 oral and poster presentations that spanned observational and modeling studies and timescales from the paleoclimate to secular change, and also covered a wide range of phenomenological studies (e.g., tropical cyclones, mid-summer droughts, low level jets) for the Intra-Americas Seas.

Progress Report for a JSOST Near-term Priority Assessing Meridional Overturning Circulation Variability: Implications for Rapid Climate Change

This document is a progress report submitted by the U.S. AMOC Science Team. The purpose of this report is to summarize progress on the main objectives of the program, identify any programmatic gaps, and make recommendations on near‐term research priorities for the program.

International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (ICOADS) Release 3, Individual Observations

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The International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (ICOADS) is a global ocean marine meteorological and surface ocean dataset. It is formed by merging many national and international data sources that contain measurements and visual observations from ships (merchant, navy, research), moored and drifting buoys, coastal stations, and other marine and near-surface ocean platforms. Each marine report contains individual observations of meteorological and oceanographic variables, such as sea surface and air temperatures, wind, pressure, humidity, and cloudiness....

Proceedings of the 6th International Workshop on Climate Informatics: CI2016

Arindam Banerjee, Wei Ding, Jennifer Dy, Vyacheslav Lyubchich & Andrew Rhines
Climate informatics is an emerging research area that combines the fields of climate science and data science (specifically machine learning, data mining and statistics) to accelerate scientific discovery in climate science. The annual climate informatics workshop, held at NCAR's Mesa Lab since 2012, promotes new collaborations and discusses new methods and directions for this emerging field. This year's proceedings contain 34 peer-reviewed short papers presented at the workshop, which describe many new methods and advances...

Streamflow drought indicators across conterminous United States

Maryam Pournasiri, Erin Towler & Indriani Pal
This dataset contains indicators for characterizing observed streamflow droughts in 603 stations through the major watershed regions of the conterminous U.S. The dataset is based on observed streamflow data from Hydro-Climatic Data Network 2009, developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. Due to multi-attributable aspect of this natural hazard, analyzing the various feature of droughts is necessary. This dataset is useful to help advance water resources decision-making and will allow researchers to identify trends as well...

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