76,385 Works

Seawater carbonate chemistry and processes during experiments with coccolithophores (Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica), 2000, supplement to: Riebesell, Ulf; Zondervan, Ingrid; Rost, Bjoern; Tortell, Philippe Daniel; Zeebe, Richard E; Morel, Francois M M (2000): Reduced calcification of marine plankton in response to increased atmospheric CO2. Nature, 407, 364-367

Ulf Riebesell, Ingrid Zondervan, Bjoern Rost, Philippe Daniel Tortell, Richard E Zeebe & Francois M M Morel
The formation of calcareous skeletons by marine planktonic organisms and their subsequent sinking to depth generates a continuous rain of calcium carbonate to the deep ocean and underlying sediments1. This is important in regulating marine carbon cycling and ocean-atmosphere CO2 exchange2. The present rise in atmospheric CO2 levels3 causes significant changes in surface ocean pH and carbonate chemistry4. Such changes have been shown to slow down calcification in corals and coralline macroalgae5,6, but the majority...

Seawater carbonate chemistry and processes during experiments with Emiliania huxleyi (PML B92/11), 2000, supplement to: Riebesell, Ulf; Revill, Andrew T; Holdsworth, Daniel G; Volkman, J K (2000): The effects of varying CO2 concentration on lipid composition and carbon isotope fractionation in Emiliania huxleyi. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 64(24), 4179-4192

Ulf Riebesell, Andrew T Revill, Daniel G Holdsworth & J K Volkman
We have measured the stable carbon isotopic composition of bulk organic matter (POC), alkenones, sterols, fatty acids, and phytol in the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi grown in dilute batch cultures over a wide range of CO2 concentrations (1.1-53.5 micromol L-1). The carbon isotope fractionation of POC (POC) varied by ca. 7 per mil and was positively correlated with aqueous CO2 concentration [CO2aq]. While this result confirms general trends observed for the same alga grown in nitrogen-limited...

Seawater carbonate chemistry and processes during experiments with Emiliania huxleyi, 2008, supplement to: Iglesias-Rodriguez, Debora; Halloran, P R; Rickaby, Rosalind E M; Hall, Ian R; Colmenero-Hidalgo, Elena; Gittins, J R; Green, Darryl R H; Tyrrell, Toby; Gibbs, Samantha J; von Dassow, P; Rehm, E; Armbrust, E Virginia; Boessenkool, K P (2008): Phytoplankton calcification in a high-CO2 world. Science, 320(5874), 336-340

Debora Iglesias-Rodriguez, P R Halloran, Rosalind E M Rickaby, Ian R Hall, Elena Colmenero-Hidalgo, J R Gittins, Darryl R H Green, Toby Tyrrell, Samantha J Gibbs, P von Dassow, E Rehm, E Virginia Armbrust & K P Boessenkool
Ocean acidification in response to rising atmospheric CO2 partial pressures is widely expected to reduce calcification by marine organisms. From the mid-Mesozoic, coccolithophores have been major calcium carbonate producers in the world's oceans, today accounting for about a third of the total marine CaCO3 production. Here, we present laboratory evidence that calcification and net primary production in the coccolithophore species Emiliania huxleyi are significantly increased by high CO2 partial pressures. Field evidence from the deep...

Seawater carbonate chemistry and silica during an experiment with a marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii, 2004, supplement to: Milligan, Allen J; Varela, Diana E; Brzezinski, Mark A; Morel, Francois M M (2004): Dynamics of silicon metabolism and silicon isotopic discrimination in a marine diatom as a function of pCO2. Limnology and Oceanography, 49(2), 322-329

Allen J Milligan, Diana E Varela, Mark A Brzezinski & Francois M M Morel
Opal accumulation rates in sediments have been used as a proxy for carbon flux, but there is poor understanding of the factors that regulate the Si quota of diatoms. Natural variation in silicon isotopes (delta.lc.gif - 54 Bytes30Si) in diatom frustules recovered from sediment cores are an alternative to opal mass for reconstructing diatom Si use and potential C export over geological timescales. Understanding the physiological factors that may influence the Si quota and the...

Seawater carbonate chemistry, growth rate and processes during experiments with Coccolithus pelagicus and Calcidiscus leptoporus, 2006, supplement to: Langer, Gerald; Geisen, Markus; Baumann, Karl-Heinz; Kläs, Jessica; Riebesell, Ulf; Thoms, Silke; Young, Jeremy (2006): Species-specific responses of calcifying algae to changing seawater carbonate chemistry. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, 7, Q09006

Gerald Langer, Markus Geisen, Karl-Heinz Baumann, Jessica Kläs, Ulf Riebesell, Silke Thoms & Jeremy Young
Uptake of half of the fossil fuel CO2 into the ocean causes gradual seawater acidification. This has been shown to slow down calcification of major calcifying groups, such as corals, foraminifera, and coccolithophores. Here we show that two of the most productive marine calcifying species, the coccolithophores Coccolithus pelagicus and Calcidiscus leptoporus, do not follow the CO2-related calcification response previously found. In batch culture experiments, particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) of C. leptoporus changes with increasing...

Seawater carbonate chemistry and processes during experiments with Emiliania huxleyi (TW1), 2003, supplement to: Sciandra, Antoine; Harlay, Jérôme; Lefèvre, Dominique; Lemee, R; Rimmelin, Peguy; Denis, Michel; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre (2003): Response of coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi to elevated partial pressure of CO2 under nitrogen limitation. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 261, 111-122

Antoine Sciandra, Jérôme Harlay, Dominique Lefèvre, R Lemee, Peguy Rimmelin, Michel Denis & Jean-Pierre Gattuso
Precipitation of calcium carbonate by phytoplankton in the photic oceanic layer is an important process regulating the carbon cycling and the exchange of CO2 at the ocean-atmosphere interface. Previous experiments have demonstrated that, under nutrient-sufficient conditions, doubling the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in seawater-a likely scenario for the end of the century-can significantly decrease both the rate of calcification by coccolithophorids and the ratio of inorganic to organic carbon production. The present work investigates...

Seawater carbonate chemistry and processes during experiments with phytoplankton Emiliania huxleyi (CS369), 2009

Kunshan Gao, Zuoxi Ruan, Virginia E Villafañe, Jean-Pierre Gattuso & E Walter Helbling

Seawater carbonate chemistry and processes during experiments with Emiliania huxleyi (PML B93/11A), supplement to: Riebesell, Ulf; Zondervan, Ingrid; Rost, Bjoern; Tortell, Philippe Daniel; Zeebe, Richard E; Morel, Francois M M (2000): Reduced calcification of marine plankton in response to increased atmospheric CO2. Nature, 407, 364-367

Ulf Riebesell, Ingrid Zondervan, Bjoern Rost, Philippe Daniel Tortell, Richard E Zeebe & Francois M M Morel
The formation of calcareous skeletons by marine planktonic organisms and their subsequent sinking to depth generates a continuous rain of calcium carbonate to the deep ocean and underlying sediments. This is important in regulating marine carbon cycling and ocean-atmosphere CO2 exchange. The present rise in atmospheric CO2 levels causes significant changes in surface ocean pH and carbonate chemistry. Such changes have been shown to slow down calcification in corals and coralline macroalgae, but the majority...

Seawater carbonate chemistry and processes during experiments with cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena, 2009, supplement to: Czerny, Jan; Barcelos e Ramos, Joana; Riebesell, Ulf (2009): Influence of elevated CO2 concentrations on cell division and nitrogen fixation rates in the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena. Biogeosciences, 6(9), 1865-1875

Jan Czerny, Joana Barcelos e Ramos & Ulf Riebesell
The surface ocean absorbs large quantities of the CO2 emitted to the atmosphere from human activities. As this CO2 dissolves in seawater, it reacts to form carbonic acid. While this phenomenon, called ocean acidification, has been found to adversely affect many calcifying organisms, some photosynthetic organisms appear to benefit from increasing [CO2]. Among these is the cyanobacterium Trichodesmium, a predominant diazotroph (nitrogen-fixing) in large parts of the oligotrophic oceans, which responded with increased carbon and...

Seawater carbonate chemistry and particulate organic particles during a semicontinuous batch culture experiment with Trichodesmium IMS101, 2007, supplement to: Barcelos e Ramos, Joana; Biswas, Haimanti; Schulz, Kai Georg; LaRoche, Julie; Riebesell, Ulf (2007): Effect of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide on the marine nitrogen fixer Trichodesmium. Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 21

Joana Barcelos e Ramos, Haimanti Biswas, Kai Georg Schulz, Julie LaRoche & Ulf Riebesell
Diazotrophic (N2-fixing) cyanobacteria provide the biological source of new nitrogen for large parts of the ocean. However, little is known about their sensitivity to global change. Here we show that the single most important nitrogen fixer in today's ocean, Trichodesmium, is strongly affected by changes in CO2 concentrations. Cell division rate doubled with rising CO2 (glacial to projected year 2100 levels) prompting lower carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cellular contents, and reduced cell dimensions. N2 fixation...

Tree-ring width of Pinus sylvestris (von Linné) from historical object sample HOH5203-1996

Michael Friedrich
Species PISY; No of rings 67; Begin 1601; End 1667

owProjectStatus2006-Oct.txt.bz2

Megan Squire, Kevin Crowston & James Howison
Project status data. A .bz2 file of archive/secondary data available as a download from http://downloads.sourceforge.net/ossmole/owProjectStatus2006-Oct.txt.bz2. Data collected from ObjectWeb as raw HTML and parsed into data files by FLOSSmole. Metadata record available at http://flosspapers.org/682.

Numerical study of blood flow in stenotic artery

Editor Applied Rheology, Editors@Appliedrheology.Org & Martin Kroger
Peer-reviewed journal article

owProjectIntAud2007-Dec.txt.bz2

Megan Squire, Kevin Crowston & James Howison
Intended audience for the product. A .bz2 file of archive/secondary data available as a download from http://downloads.sourceforge.net/ossmole/owProjectIntAud2007-Dec.txt.bz2. Data collected from ObjectWeb as raw HTML and parsed into data files by FLOSSmole. Metadata record available at http://flosspapers.org/1370.

owProjectInfo2008-Jan.txt.bz2

Megan Squire, Kevin Crowston & James Howison
Project information. A .bz2 file of archive/secondary data available as a download from http://downloads.sourceforge.net/ossmole/owProjectInfo2008-Jan.txt.bz2. Data collected from ObjectWeb as raw HTML and parsed into data files by FLOSSmole. Metadata record available at http://flosspapers.org/1381.

sfRawDownloadsData01-Oct-2006.txt.bz2

Megan Squire, Kevin Crowston & James Howison
Download statistics. A .bz2 file of archive/secondary data available as a download from http://downloads.sourceforge.net/ossmole/sfRawDownloadsData01-Oct-2006.txt.bz2. Data collected from SourceForge as raw HTML and parsed into data files by FLOSSmole. Metadata record available at http://flosspapers.org/706.

project_intaud02-Feb-2006.csv.bz2

Megan Squire, Kevin Crowston & James Howison
Intended audience for the product. A .bz2 file of archive/secondary data available as a download from http://downloads.sourceforge.net/ossmole/project_intaud02-Feb-2006.csv.bz2. Data collected from FLOSSmole as raw HTML and parsed into data files by FLOSSmole. Metadata record available at http://flosspapers.org/488.

Design & Simulation of SEPIC/CUK Converter for Optimal Loading of Photovoltaic Array

N. Savita, R.K. Nema & G. Agnihotri
24th European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, 21-25 September 2009, Hamburg, Germany; 3620-3624

Viscoelastic Characterization of Polymer-Modified Asphalt Binders of Pavement Applications

Editor Applied Rheology, Martin Kroger & Editors@Appliedrheology.Org
Applied Rheology

sfProjectList01-Aug-2006.txt.bz2

Megan Squire, Kevin Crowston & James Howison
Project list for the source repository. A .bz2 file of archive/secondary data available as a download from http://downloads.sourceforge.net/ossmole/sfProjectList01-Aug-2006.txt.bz2. Data collected from SourceForge as raw HTML and parsed into data files by FLOSSmole. Metadata record available at http://flosspapers.org/629.

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