26 Works

Data from: Is male rhesus macaque facial coloration under intrasexual selection?

Megan Petersdorf, Constance Dubuc, Alexander V. Georgiev, Sandra Winters, James P. Higham, James P Higham & Alexander V Georgiev
Exaggerated male traits can evolve under intra- or intersexual selection, but it remains less clear how often both mechanisms act together on trait evolution. While the males of many anthropoid primate species exhibit colorful signals that appear to be badges of status under intrasexual selection, the red facial coloration of male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) appears to have evolved primarily under intersexual selection and female mate choice. Nonetheless, experiments show that red color is salient...

Data from: Stable isotopes reveal the effect of trawl fisheries on the diet of commercially exploited species

Hilmar Hinz, Joan Moranta, Stephen Balestrini, Marija Sciberras, Julia R. Pantin, James Monnington, Alex Zalewski, Michel J. Kaiser, Mattias Sköld, Patrik Jonsson, Francois Bastardie & Jan Geert Hiddink
Bottom trawling can change food availability for benthivorous demersal species by (i) changing benthic prey composition through physical seabed impacts and (ii) by removing overall benthic consumer biomass increasing the net availability of benthic prey for remaining individuals. Thus trawling may both negatively and positively influence the quantity and quality of food available. Using δ13C and δ15N we investigated potential diet changes of three commercially exploited species across trawling gradients in the Kattegat (plaice, dab...

Data from: The genetics of mate preferences in hybrids between two young and sympatric Lake Victoria cichlid species

Ola Svensson, Katie Woodhouse, Cock Van Oosterhout, Alan Smith, George F. Turner & Ole Seehausen
The genetic architecture of mate preferences is likely to affect significant evolutionary processes, including speciation and hybridization. Here, we investigate laboratory hybrids between a pair of sympatric Lake Victoria cichlid fish species that appear to have recently evolved from a hybrid population between similar predecessor species. The species demonstrate strong assortative mating in the laboratory, associated with divergent male breeding coloration (red dorsum versus blue). We show in a common garden experiment, using DNA-based paternity...

Aboveground plant biomass and soil respiration for seven European shrublands under drought and warming manipulations (1998-2012)

S. Reinsch, E. Koller, A. Sowerby, G. De Dato, M. Estiarte, G. Guidolotti, E. Kovács-Láng, G Kröel-Dula, E. Lellei-Kovács, K.S. Larsen, D. Liberati, R Ogaya, J. Peñuelas, J. Ransijn, D.A. Robinson, I.K. Schmidt, A.R. Smith, A. Tietema, J.S. Dukes, C. Beier & B.A. Emmett
The data consists of annual measurements of standing aboveground plant biomass, annual aboveground net primary productivity and annual soil respiration between 1998 and 2012. Data were collected from seven European shrublands that were subject to the climate manipulations drought and warming. Sites were located in the United Kingdom (UK), the Netherlands (NL), Denmark ( two sites, DK-B and DK-M), Hungary (HU), Spain (SP) and Italy (IT). All field sites consisted of untreated control plots, plots...

Soil physical, chemical and biological measurements in the Conwy Catchment (North Wales) 2013 and 2014

H.C. Glanville, S. Reinsch, S.M Smart, B.J. Cosby, M.R. Marshall, B.A. Emmett, L.L. De Sosa, C. Cerdá-Moreno, E. Mesa, I. Mart­ínez, J. Espí­, S. Chesworth, W. Havelange & D.L. Jones
The data consist of general physical, biological and chemical parameters for soil samples taken in the Conwy catchment in North West Wales. Samples were collected between 2013 and 2014 across a land use intensification gradient ranging from semi-natural peatlands, acid grasslands to improved grasslands and arable fields. Soil cores were taken to a depth of 1 metre and divided into 15 centimetre (cm) depth increments. General soil physical and chemical parameters were measured at each...

Soil carbon data in the Conwy catchment in North Wales 2014

H.C. Glanville, S. Reinsch, B.J. Cosby, B.A. Emmett, M.R. Marshall, S.M. Smart, J.B. Winterbourn & D.L. Jones
The data consist of soil carbon in kilogrammes (kg) of carbon per metre squared. Soil cores were taken to a depth of 1 metre and divided into 15 cm depth increments. Soil carbon (kg carbon per metre squared) was determined for all soil depth increments. The soil samples were taken in the Conwy catchment in North West Wales. Samples were collected in the spring of 2014 across a land use intensification gradient ranging from semi-natural...

Plant physiological measurements in North Wales and Northwest England (2013, 2014 and 2016)

M.C. Blanes, S. Reinsch, L. Mercado, H. Harmens, S. Smart, B.J. Cosby, H.C. Glanville, D.L. Jones, M.R. Marshall & B.A. Emmett
The data consists of plant physiological measurements from 15 sites located in the Conwy catchment (North Wales) and from 2 sites in North West England. Plant photosynthetic parameters for the maximum rate of carboxylation (Vcmax), the maximum rate of electron transport (Jmax) and the maximum light saturated photosynthesis (Asat) were measured on the dominant plant species as were foliar nitrogen (Foliar N) and phosphorus (Foliar P). Leaf mass area (LMA) and specific leaf area (SLA)...

Data from: Niche conservatism and the invasive potential of the wild boar

Lilian Patricia Sales, Bruno R. Ribeiro, Matt W. Hayward, Adriano P. Paglia, Marcelo Passamani, Rafael Loyola, Matt Warrington Hayward & Adriano Paglia
1.Niche conservatism, i.e. the retention of a species’ fundamental niche through evolutionary time, is cornerstone for biological invasion assessments. The fact that species tend to maintain their original climate niche allows predictive maps of invasion risk to anticipate potential invadable areas. Unraveling the mechanisms driving niche shifts can shed light on the management of invasive species. 2.Here, we assessed niche shifts in one of the world's worst invasive species: the wild boar Sus scrofa. We...

Data from: Impacts of logging roads on tropical forests

Fritz Kleinschroth & John R. Healey
Road networks are expanding in tropical countries, increasing human access to remote forests that act as refuges for biodiversity and provide globally important ecosystem services. Logging is one of the main drivers of road construction in tropical forests. We evaluated forest fragmentation and impacts of logging roads on forest resilience and wildlife, considering the full life cycle of logging roads. Through an extensive evidence review we found that for logging road construction, corridors between 3...

Conwy stream and estuary water quality data (2013-2016) [Turf2Surf]

D.M. Cooper, M.R. Marshall, S.K. Malham, J.L. Williamson, K. Spinney, J.B. Winterbourn, T.D. Peters, E.R. Howlett, P. Rajko-Nenow, M.G. Pereira, A.J. Lawler, P.O. Keenan, S.A. Thacker, S. Hughes & I. Lebron
The data comprise water quality measurements taken from streams and rivers in the Conwy catchment and its estuary from March 2013 to October 2016. Depending on water type and sampling location the data consist of concentrations of major cations and anions, pH, conductivity, alkalinity, suspended material and coliforms. Samples were collected manually or by automatic sampler. Analysis was carried out at the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) Bangor, CEH Lancaster and Bangor University laboratories....

Data from: Immanent conditions determine imminent collapses: nutrient regimes define the resilience of macroalgal communities

Jordi Boada, Rohan Arthur, David Alonso, Jordi F. Pagès, Albert Pessarrodona, Silvia Oliva, Giulia Ceccherelli, Luigi Piazzi, Javier Romero & Teresa Alcoverro
Predicting where state-changing thresholds lie can be inherently complex in ecosystems characterized by nonlinear dynamics. Unpacking the mechanisms underlying these transitions can help considerably reduce this unpredictability. We used empirical observations, field and laboratory experiments, and mathematical models to examine how differences in nutrient regimes mediate the capacity of macrophyte communities to sustain sea urchin grazing. In relatively nutrient-rich conditions, macrophyte systems were more resilient to grazing, shifting to barrens beyond 1 800 g m−2...

Data from: Convergence of multiple markers and analysis methods defines the genetic distinctiveness of cryptic pitvipers

, Roger S. Thorpe, Simon Creer, Delphine Lallias, Louise Dawnay, Bryan L. Stuart, Anita Malhotra, &
Using multiple markers and multiple analytical approaches is critical for establishing species boundaries reliably, especially so in the case of cryptic species. Despite development of new and powerful analytical methods, most studies continue to adopt a few, with the choice often being subjective. One such example is routine analysis of Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) data using population genetic models despite disparity between method assumptions and data properties. The application of newly developed methods for...

Data from: Contrasting patterns of leaf trait variation among and within species during tropical dry forest succession in Costa Rica

Geraldine Derroire, Jennifer S. Powers, Catherine M. Hulshof, Luis E. Cárdenas Varela & John R. Healey
A coordinated response to environmental drivers amongst individual functional traits is central to the plant strategy concept. However, whether the trait co-ordination observed at the global scale occurs at other ecological scales (especially within species) remains an open question. Here, for sapling communities of two tropical dry forest types in Costa Rica, we show large differences amongst traits in the relative contribution of species turnover and intraspecific variation to their directional changes in response to...

Data from: A spatially integrated framework for assessing socioecological drivers of carnivore decline

Nicolás Gálvez, Gurutzeta Guillera-Arroita, Freya A. V. St. John, Elke Schüttler, David W. Macdonald & Zoe G. Davies
Habitat loss, fragmentation and degradation are key threats to the long-term persistence of carnivores, which are also susceptible to direct persecution by people. Integrating natural and social science methods to examine how habitat configuration/quality and human–predator relations may interact in space and time to effect carnivore populations within human-dominated landscapes will help prioritise conservation investment and action effectively. We propose a socioecological modelling framework to evaluate drivers of carnivore decline in landscapes where predators and...

Data from: Plio-Pleistocene phylogeography of the Southeast Asian Blue Panchax killifish, Aplocheilus panchax

Samantha V. Beck, Gary R. Carvalho, Axel Barlow, Lukas Rüber, Heok Hui Tan, Estu Nugroho, Daisy Wowor, Siti Azizah Mohd Nor, Fabian Herder, Zainal A. Muchlisin, Mark De Bruyn & Heok Hui Tan
The complex climatic and geological history of Southeast Asia has shaped this region’s high biodiversity. In particular, sea level fluctuations associated with repeated glacial cycles during the Pleistocene both facilitated, and limited, connectivity between populations. In this study, we used data from two mitochondrial and three anonymous nuclear markers to determine whether a fresh/brackish water killifish, Aplocheilus panchax, Hamilton, 1822, could be used to further understand how climatic oscillations and associated sea level fluctuations have...

Data from: Estimating the prevalence of food risk increasing behaviours in UK kitchens

Anna K. Jones, Paul Cross, Michael Burton, Caroline Millman, Sarah J. O'Brien, Dan Rigby & Sarah J. O’Brien
Foodborne disease poses a serious threat to public health. In the UK, half a million cases are linked to known pathogens and more than half of all outbreaks are associated with catering establishments. The UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) has initiated the UK Food Hygiene Rating Scheme in which commercial food establishments are inspected and scored with the results made public. In this study we investigate the prevalence of food risk increasing behaviours among chefs,...

Annual soil respiration under experimental drought and warming at Clocaenog forest (1999-2016)

M. Dominguez, S. Reinsch, A. Sowerby, A.R. Smith, R.J. Harvey, J.B. Winterbourn, M.R. Brooks, D.A. Robinson & B.A. Emmett
The data consists of annual values of soil respiration for plots subjected to climate change manipulations between 1999 and 2016. Data were collected from the climate change field site Climoor that is located in Clocaenog forest, Northeast Wales. The experimental field site consists of three untreated control plots (Plots 3, 6 and 9), three plots where the plant canopy air is artificially warmed during night time hours (Plots 1, 2 and 7) and three plots...

Data from: Recovery linked to life history of sessile epifauna following exclusion of towed mobile fishing gear

Michel J. Kaiser, Samantha Hormbrey, Jonathan R. Booth, Hilmar Hinz, Jan Geert Hiddink & Jan G. Hiddink
1. The use of reserves as conservation tools is widespread. However, evaluating the effectiveness of reserve implementation for long-lived species has been problematic as it requires sampling programmes over long time scales that are appropriate to species’ longevity and recovery rates. In the sea, towed bottom fishing gears alter the biodiversity and ecosystem services provided by benthic communities and habitats. Marine reserves have been used to manage these impacts but our understanding of the drivers...

Data from: Isotopic methods for non-destructive assessment of carbon dynamics in shrublands under long-term climate change manipulation

Louise C. Andresen, Maria T. Dominguez, Sabine Reinsch, Andy R. Smith, Inger Kappel Schmidt, Per Ambus, Claus Beier, Pascal Boeckx, Roland Bol, Giovanbattista De Dato, Bridget A. Emmett, Marc Estiarte, Mark H. Garnett, György Kröel-Dulay, Sharon L. Mason, Cecilie S. Nielsen, Josep Penuelas, Albert Tietema, Inger K. Schmidt & Andrew R. Smith
1.Long-term climate change experiments are extremely valuable for studying ecosystem responses to environmental change. Examination of the vegetation and the soil should be non-destructive to guarantee long-term research. In this paper, we review field methods using isotope techniques for assessing carbon dynamics in the plant-soil-air continuum, based on recent field experience and examples from a European climate change manipulation network. 2.Eight European semi-natural shrubland ecosystems were exposed to warming and drought manipulations. One field site...

Data from: Rapid assessment of forest canopy and light regime using smartphone hemispherical photography

Simone Bianchi, Christine Cahalan, Sophie Hale & James Michael Gibbons
Hemispherical photography (HP), implemented with cameras equipped with “fisheye” lenses, is a widely used method for describing forest canopies and light regimes. A promising technological advance is the availability of low-cost fisheye lenses for smartphone cameras. However, smartphone camera sensors cannot record a full hemisphere. We investigate whether smartphone HP is a cheaper and faster but still adequate operational alternative to traditional cameras for describing forest canopies and light regimes. We collected hemispherical pictures with...

Soil hydraulic property data from the Climoor fieldsite in the Clocaenog Forest (2010-2012) v2

D.A. Robinson, I. Lebron, A.R. Smith, M.R. Marshall, B.A. Emmett, S. Reinsch, D.M. Cooper & M.R. Brooks
This dataset contains soil hydraulic measurement data from the Climoor field site in the Clocaenog forest, in North Wales. The collection contains five data sets. 1) soil bulk density (0-5 centimetre) and saturated water content. 2) Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity measured in the field at tensions of -2 and -6 centimetre using a mini disk infiltrometer. 3) Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity measured using a HYPROP (registered trademark) instrument, an instrument which determines the hydraulic properties of soil...

Microbial enzyme activities under experimental drought and warming at Clocaenog forest and Peaknaze Moor (2012)

M. Dominguez, S. Reinsch, E. Holthof, A.R. Smith, E. Koller & B.A. Emmett
This data consist of measurements on soil microbial enzyme activity of six hydrolytic enzymes and related soil measurements from the experimental field sites at Clocaenog forest and Peaknaze. Samples were collected in 2012 from plots subjected to experimental drought and warming as well as untreated control plots. Soil cores were taken for the topsoil 0 to10 centimetres. Enzymes were measured at the climate change field site Climoor that is located in Clocaenog forest, North East...

Plant aboveground and belowground standing biomass measurements in the Conwy catchment in North Wales (2013 and 2014)

S.M. Smart., S. Reinsch, L. Mercado, M.C. Blanes, B.J. Cosby, H.C. Glanville, D.L. Jones, M.R. Marshall & B.A. Emmett
The data consists of, standing aboveground biomass, and belowground biomass measurements, from sites in the Conwy catchment. Standing aboveground biomass was measured at 7 sites and belowground biomass measurements were made at 8 sites. Data were collected in 2013 and 2014. The sites were chosen to represent habitat types and the terrestrial productivity gradient in Britain from intensive agriculturally managed lowland grasslands through to montane heath. Standing aboveground biomass (grams of dry mass per metre...

Boreal forest floor greenhouse gas emissions across a wildfire-disturbed chronosequence

K.E. Mason, S. Oakley, L.E. Street, M. Arróniz-Crespo, D.L. Jones, T.H. DeLuca & N.J. Ostle
Data collected during field experiments to investigate the effect of wildfires on greenhouse gas emissions across forests of differing ages in Sweden. Data comprise greenhouse gas measurements, soil horizon depth, bulk density, loss on ignition, pH, soil phosphorus, carbon and nitrogen, plant species cover, air temperature, soil temperature, soil moisture and surface leaf moisture. Greenhouse gas measurements were taken in the field. Soil cores were collected, then processed and analysed in the laboratory. Plant species...

Data from: Evolutionary and structural analyses uncover a role for solvent interactions in the diversification of cocoonases in butterflies

Gilbert Smith, John E. Kelly, Aide Macias-Muñoz, Carter T. Butts, Rachel W. Martin & Adriana D. Briscoe
Multi-omic approaches promise to supply the power to detect genes underlying disease and fitness-related phenotypes. Optimal use of the resulting profusion of data requires detailed investigation of individual candidate genes, a challenging proposition. Here, we combine transcriptomic and genomic data with molecular modeling of candidate enzymes to characterize the evolutionary history and function of the serine protease cocoonase. Heliconius butterflies possess the unique ability to feed on pollen; recent work has identified cocoonase as a...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    26

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    26

Affiliations

  • Bangor University
    26
  • Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    10
  • University of Jaén
    2
  • National University of Singapore
    2
  • University of Bern
    2
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    2
  • University of Copenhagen
    2
  • University of Exeter
    2
  • University of Amsterdam
    2
  • University of Oxford
    2