352 Works

Misinformation, internet honey trading, and beekeepers drive a plant invasion

Magdalena Lenda, Piotr Skórka, Karolina Kuszewska, Dawid Moroń, Michał Bełcik, Renata Baczek Kwinta, Franciszek Janowiak, David H. Duncan, Peter A. Vesk, Hugh P. Possingham & Johannes M. H. Knops
Biological invasions are a major human induced global change that is threatening global biodiversity by homogenizing the world’s fauna and flora. Species spread because humans have moved species across geographic boundaries and have changed ecological factors that structure ecosystems, such as nitrogen deposition, disturbance, etc. Many biological invasions are caused accidentally, as a byproduct of human travel and commerce driven product shipping. However, humans also have spread many species intentionally because of perceived benefits. Of...

Data for the effect of optic flow cues on honeybee flight control in wind

Emily Baird, Norbert Boeddeker & Mandyam Srinivasan
To minimise the risk of colliding with the ground or other obstacles, flying animals need to control both their ground speed and ground height. This task is particularly challenging in wind, where head winds require an animal to increase its airspeed to maintain a constant ground speed and tail winds may generate negative airspeeds, rendering flight more difficult to control. In this study, we investigate how head and tail winds affect flight control in the...

Rubble Biodiversity Samplers (RUBS): 3D-printed coral models to standardise biodiversity censuses

Kennedy Wolfe & Peter Mumby
1. To ensure standardised, quantitative and repeatable methodologies, marine ecologists have engineered a range of artificial units to survey benthic communities with varying designs depending on target taxa, life history stage and habitat. In tropical ecosystems, autonomous units have typically lacked microhabitat complexity (e.g. planar tiles), short-term efficacy (> 1 y deployment) and/or a truly standardised design to sample cryptobenthic diversity. 2. Coral rubble is characterised by high microhabitat complexity, which is unresolved in sampling...

Data from: Primate hippocampus size and organization are predicted by sociality but not diet

Orlin Todorov, Vera Weisbecker, Emmanuel Gilissen, Karl Zilles & Alexandra Allison De Sousa
The hippocampus is well known for its roles in spatial navigation and memory, but it is organized into regions that have different connections and functional specializations. Notably, the region CA2 has a role in social cognition, and not spatial cognition as is the case for the regions CA1 and CA3 that surround it. Here we investigated the evolution of the hippocampus in terms of its size and its organization into regions in relation to the...

Data from: Regional climate and local-scale biotic acceptance explain native-exotic diversity relationships in Australian annual plant communities

Isaac R. Towers, John M. Dwyer, John. M. Dwyer & Isaac. R. Towers
Native and exotic species richness is expected to be negatively related at small spatial scales where individuals interact, and positive at larger spatial scales as a greater variety of habitats are sampled. However, a range of native-exotic richness relationships (NERRs) have been reported, including positive at small scales and negative at larger scales. We present a hierarchical metacommunity framework to explain how contrasting NERRs may emerge across scales and study systems, and then apply this...

Data from: Filters of floristic exchange: how traits and climate shape the rainforest invasion of Sahul from Sunda

Jia-Yee S. Yap, Maurizio Rossetto, Craig Costion, Darren Crayn, Robert M. Kooyman, James Richardson & Robert Henry
Aim To evaluate how biogeographic and ecological processes influenced species distributions and community assembly in a continental rainforest flora with mixed biogeographic origins. Location Continental Australia. Methods We identified 795 species with Sahul ancestry (Australian rainforest flora of Gondwanan origin) and 604 species with Sunda ancestry (rainforest plant lineages of Indo-Malesian origin) from a total of 1872 free-standing Australian woody rainforest taxa. We then compared the distribution of Sunda to Sahul species in relation to...

Data from: Temporally inter-comparable maps of terrestrial wilderness and the Last of the Wild

James Allan, Oscar Venter & James E. M. Watson
Wilderness areas, defined as areas free of industrial scale activities and other human pressures which result in significant biophysical disturbance, are important for biodiversity conservation and sustaining the key ecological processes underpinning planetary life-support systems. Despite their importance, wilderness areas are being rapidly eroded in extent and fragmented. Here we present the most up-to-date temporally inter-comparable maps of global terrestrial wilderness areas, which are essential for monitoring changes in their extent, and for proactively planning...

Deafness in Australian Cattle Dogs associated to QTL on chromosome 20 in GWAS analyses

Jenny Seddon, Susan Sommerlad & Marina Fortes
Pigment-associated deafness is a common hereditary condition in a range of dog breeds. The aim of this study was to perform a genome-wide association analysis to investigate the genetic architecture of deafness in Australian Cattle Dogs. Genotypes for 104,757 polymorphisms in 96 Australian dogs were available for analyses after quality control and included here. Further samples from US and UK are available here (https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.sf7m0cg2n). A genomic relationship matrix was used in the mixed model analyses...

The conspecific avoidance strategies of adult female-calf humpback whales

Katherine Indeck, Michael Noad & Rebecca Dunlop
During migration, humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) adult females and their calves use acoustic calling to help maintain contact. The signals produced by these pairs, however, may unintentionally attract nearby breeding males, which can result in interactions that have negative physical and physiological effects on the calf. Therefore, maternal females must choose the vocal and/or behavioral strategy that most effectively balances intra-pair communication with male avoidance. Here, we analyzed differences in adult female-calf vocal activity and...

Single molecule tracking raw data: SOX18 and its dominant-negative mutant SOX18RaOp

Alex McCann, Jieqiong Lou, Mehdi Moustaqil, Matthew Graus, Ailisa Blum, Frank Fontaine, Hui Liu, Winnie Luu, Peter Koopman, Emma Sierecki, Yann Gambin, Frédéric Meunier, Zhe Liu, Elizabeth Hinde & Mathias Francois
Few genetically dominant mutations involved in human disease have been fully explained at the molecular level. In cases where the mutant gene encodes a transcription factor, the dominant-negative mode of action of the mutant protein is particularly poorly understood. Here, we studied the genome-wide mechanism underlying a dominant-negative form of the SOX18 transcription factor (SOX18RaOp) responsible for both the classical mouse mutant Ragged Opossum and the human genetic disorder Hypotrichosis-Lymphedema-Telangiectasia-Renal Syndrome. Combining three single-molecule imaging...

Effect of Physical Activity Intelligence (PAI) monitoring in the maintenance phase of cardiac rehabilitation: A mixed methods evaluation

Amanda Hannan, Wayne Hing, Jeff Coombes, Suzanne Gough, Mike Climstein, Geoff Adsett, Satyajit Rohan Jayasinghe & James Furness
Dataset of the results of PAI monitoring on the amount and/or intensity of physical activity for people with cardiac disease and participants’ perceptions of this approach.

Data from: General rules for environmental management to prioritise social-ecological systems research based on a value of information approach

Katrina Davis, Iadine Chades, Jonathan Rhodes & Michael Bode
1. Globally, billions of dollars are invested each year to help understand the dynamics of social-ecological systems (SES) in bettering both social and environmental outcomes. However, there is no scientific consensus on which aspect of an SES is most important and urgent to understand; particularly given the realities of limited time and money. 2. Here we use a simulation-based “value of information” approach to examine where research will deliver the most important information for environmental...

Data from: Landscape structure mediates zoochorous-dispersed seed rain under isolated pasture trees across distinct tropical regions

Lachlan S. Charles, John D. Dwyer, Hazel M. Chapman, Biplang G. Yadok & Margaret M. Mayfield
Context: Isolated pasture trees play an important role in forest recovery within fragmented tropical landscapes by attracting seed dispersers and facilitating seedling growth. However, studies with conflicting results have led to confusion about what drives variation in zoochorous-dispersed seed rain patterns under isolated tree canopies. Objectives: To assess the role of landscape and biological factors impacting zoochorous-dispersed seed rain under isolated pasture trees across three tropical regions of the world. Methods: We measured seed dispersal...

Data from: Nutrient availability controls the impact of mammalian herbivores on soil carbon and nitrogen pools in grasslands

Judith Sitters, E.R. Jasper Wubs, Elisabeth S. Bakker, Thomas W. Crowther, Peter B. Adler, Sumanta Bagchi, Jonathan D. Bakker, Lori Biederman, Elizabeth T. Borer, Elsa E. Cleland, Nico Eisenhauer, Jennifer Firn, Laureano Gherardi, Nicole Hagenah, Yann Hautier, Sarah E. Hobbie, Johannes M.H. Knops, Andrew S. MacDougall, Rebecca L. McCulley, Joslin L. Moore, Brent Mortensen, Pablo L. Peri, Suzanne M. Prober, Charlotte Riggs, Anita C. Risch … &
Grasslands have been subject to considerable alteration due to human activities globally, including widespread changes in populations and composition of large mammalian herbivores and elevated supply of nutrients. Grassland soils remain important reservoirs of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N). Herbivores may affect both C and N pools and these changes likely interact with increases in soil nutrient availability. Given the scale of grassland soil fluxes, such changes can have striking consequences for atmospheric C concentrations...

Genome-wide SNPs detect no evidence of genetic population structure for reef manta rays (Mobula alfredi) in southern Mozambique

Stephanie Venables, Andrea Marshall, Amelia Armstrong, Joseph Tomkins & Jason Kennington
Little is known about the extent of genetic connectivity along continuous coastlines in manta rays or whether site visitation is influenced by relatedness. Such information is pertinent to defining population boundaries and understanding localised dispersal patterns and behaviour. Here, we use 3057 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to evaluate population genetic structure and assess levels of relatedness at aggregation sites of reef manta rays (Mobula alfredi) in southern Mozambique (n = 114). Contrary to indications...

Evolutionary biogeography of the reef-building coral genus Galaxea across the Indo-Pacific ocean

Patricia Wepfer, Patricia H. Wepfer, Yuichi Nakajima, Makamas Sutthacheep, Veronica Z. Radice, Zoe Richards, Put Ang, Tullia Terraneo, Mareike Sudek, Atsushi Fujimura, Robert J. Toonen, Alexander S. Mikheyev, Evan P. Economo & Satoshi Mitarai
Stony corals (Scleractinia) form the basis for some of the most diverse ecosytems on Earth, but we have much to learn about their evolutionary history and systematic relationships. In order to improve our understanding of species in corals we here investigated phylogenetic relationships between morphologically defined species and genetic lineages in the genus Galaxea (Euphyllidae) using a combined phylogenomic and phylogeographic ap- proach. Previous studies revealed the nominal species G. fascicularis included three genetically well-differ-...

Data from: Identifying 'useful' fitness models: balancing the benefits of added complexity with realistic data requirements in models of individual plant fitness

Trace Martyn, Daniel Stouffer, Oscar Godoy, Ignasi Bartomeus, Abigail Pastore & Margaret Mayfield
Direct species interactions are commonly included in individual fitness models used for coexistence and local-diversity modeling. Though widely considered important for such models, direct interactions alone are often insufficient for accurately predicting fitness, coexistence or diversity outcomes. Incorporating higher-order interactions (HOIs) can lead to more accurate individual fitness models, but also adds many model terms, which can quickly result in model over-fitting. We explore approaches for balancing the trade-off between tractability and model accuracy that...

Data from: Australia's prehistoric 'swamp king': revision of the Plio-Pleistocene crocodylian genus Pallimnarchus de Vis, 1886

Jorgo Ristevski, Adam M. Yates, Gilbert J. Price, Ralph E. Molnar, Vera Weisbecker & Steven W. Salisbury
The crocodylian fossil record from the Cenozoic of Australasia is notable for its rich taxonomic diversity, and is primarily represented by members of the clade Mekosuchinae. Reports of crocodylian fossils from Australia date back to the late nineteenth century. In 1886, Charles Walter de Vis proposed the name Pallimnarchus pollens for crocodylian fossils from southeast Queensland – the first binomen given to an extinct crocodylian taxon from Australia. Pallimnarchus has come to be regarded as...

GPR120 in control of pancreatic polypeptide secretion from male mouse islets via phospholipase C-mediated calcium mobilization

Yufeng Zhao, Xiao-Cheng Li, Xiang-Yan Liang, Yan-Yan Zhao, Rong Xie, Li-Jun Zhang, Xiao-Chun Zhang & Chen Chen
GPR120-IRES-EGFP mice were generated on C57BL/6J background. The sequence of IRES-EGFP was inserted into the genome behind the gene termination codon TAA of GPR120 gene by targeted integration with CRISPR/Cas9 technology to generate the knockin (KI) mice that express EGFP under the control of GPR120 expression. In brief, the recombinant donor vector containing IRES-EGFP element was constructed and identified by double enzyme digestion. The Cas9 mRNA, guide RNA and the donor vector were transferred into...

Data from: The effects of vessel noise on the communication network of humpback whales

Rebecca Dunlop
Humpback whales likely rely on acoustic communication to mediate social interactions. The distance to which these social signals propagate from the signaller defines its communication space, and therefore communication network (number of potential receivers). As humpback whales migrate along populated coastlines, they are likely to encounter noise from vessel traffic which will mask their social signals. Since no empirical data exists on baleen whale hearing, the consequences of this are usually assumed, being the modelled...

Microbial associations and spatial proximity predict North American moose (Alces alces) gastrointestinal community composition

Nicholas Fountain-Jones, Nicholas Clark, Amy Kinsley, Michelle Carstensen, James Forester, Johnson Timothy, Elizabeth Miller, Seth Moore, Tiffany Wolf & Meggan Craft
Microbial communities are increasingly recognised as crucial for animal health. However, our understanding of how microbial communities are structured across wildlife populations is poor. Mechanisms such as interspecific associations are important in structuring free-living communities, but we still lack an understanding of how important interspecific associations are in structuring gut microbial communities in comparison to other factors such as host characteristics or spatial proximity of hosts. Here we ask how gut microbial communities are structured...

Differential Proteomic Expression of Equine Cardiac and Lamellar Tissue During Insulin-Induced Laminitis

Allison Campolo, Matthew Frantz, Melody De Laat, Steven Hartson, Martin Furr & Veronique Lacombe
Endocrinopathic laminitis is pathologically similar to the multi-organ dysfunction and peripheral neuropathy found in human patients with metabolic syndrome. Similarly, endocrinopathic laminitis has been shown to partially result from vascular dysfunction. However, despite extensive research, the pathogenesis of this disease is not well elucidated and laminitis remains without an effective treatment. Here, we sought to identify novel proteins and pathways underlying the development of equine endocrinopathic laminitis. Healthy Standardbred horses (n=4/group) were either given an...

Restoration thinning permits stems to capitalise on high-rainfall years in a regenerating endangered forest ecosystem

Isaac Towers & John Dwyer
1. Passively regenerating native vegetation presents a cost-effective opportunity to sequester carbon and reinstate habitat in heavily cleared agricultural landscapes. 2. However, in some cases a few woody species recolonise in dense, low-diversity stands that are slow to self-thin. 3. Restoration thinning of over-dominant species has been proposed to accelerate ecosystem recovery, but its longer-term efficacy remains uncertain, and is likely to depend strongly on rainfall. 4. This study focuses on a restoration thinning experiment...

Data from: Catchment zoning for freshwater conservation: refining plans to enhance action on the ground

Virgilio Hermoso, Lorenzo Cattarino, Mark J. Kennard, Matthew Watts, Simon Linke & Mathew Watts
1. Recent advances in freshwater conservation planning allow addressing some of the specific needs of these systems. These include spatial connectivity or propagation of threats along stream networks, essential to ensure the maintenance of ecosystem processes and the biodiversity they sustain. However, these peculiarities make conservation recommendations difficult to implement as they often require considering large areas that cannot be managed under conventional conservation schemes (e.g. strict protection). 2. To facilitate the implementation of conservation...

Data from: Not the time or the place: the missing spatio-temporal link in publicly available genetic data

Lisa C. Pope, Libby Liggins, Jude Keyse, Silvia B. Carvalho & Cynthia Riginos
Genetic data are being generated at unprecedented rates. Policies of many journals, institutions and funding bodies aim to ensure that these data are publicly archived so that published results are reproducible. Additionally, publicly archived data can be ‘repurposed’ to address new questions in the future. In 2011, along with other leading journals in ecology and evolution, Molecular Ecology implemented mandatory public data archiving (the Joint Data Archiving Policy). To evaluate the effect of this policy,...

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