56 Works

Data from: Niche partitioning between river shark species is driven by seasonal fluctuations in environmental salinity

Ross Dwyer, Hamish Campbell, Rebecca Cramp, Colin Burke, Mariana Micheli-Campbell, Richard Pillans, Barry Lyon & Craig Franklin
Tropical rivers and estuaries are highly dynamic environments, where environmental conditions change dramatically over spatial and temporal scales. This creates both physiological and ecological challenges for euryhaline elasmobranchs, where fluctuations in salinity can impact not only osmoregulatory function, but also the ability to find and acquire prey. We investigated how spatial and temporal variation in environmental salinity influences physiological homeostasis, habitat utilisation, and migration timing in two euryhaline carcharhinid sharks within a tropical river in...

Extreme rainfall events and cooling of sea turtle clutches: implications in the face of climate warming

Jacques-Olivier Laloë, Jamie N. Tedeschi, David T. Booth, Ian Bell Bell, Andy Dunstan, Richard D. Reina & Graeme C. Hays
Understanding how climate change impacts species and ecosystems is integral to conservation. When studying impacts of climate change, warming temperatures are a research focus, with much less attention given to extreme weather events and their impacts. Here we show how localized, extreme rainfall events can have a major impact on a species that is endangered in many parts of its range. We report incubation temperatures from the world’s largest green sea turtle rookery, during a...

Single-cell visualization indicates direct role of sponge host in uptake of dissolved organic matter

Michelle Achlatis, Mathieu Pernice, Kathryn Green, Jasper De Goeij, Paul Guagliardo, Matt Kilburn, Ove Hoegh-Guldberg & Sophie Dove
Marine sponges are set to become more abundant in many near-future oligotrophic environments, where they play crucial roles in nutrient cycling. Of high importance is their mass turnover of dissolved organic matter (DOM), a heterogeneous mixture that constitutes the largest fraction of organic matter in the ocean and is recycled primarily by bacterial mediation. Little is known however about the mechanism that enables sponges to incorporate large quantities of DOM in their nutrition, unlike most...

Biotic exchange leaves detectable genomic patterns in the Australian rainforest flora

Jia-Yee Yap, Marlien Van Der Merwe, Andrew Ford, Robert Henry & Maurizio Rossetto
The movement (or invasion) of plant lineages from Sunda (the Malay Archipelago) into Sahul (mainland Australia) has resulted in a present-day Australian rainforest flora of mixed ancestries. Floristic integration increased during the Quaternary when continental vegetation was subjected to recurrent expansion/contraction cycles. To date, this expansion history has yet to be investigated through multi-species, landscape-level genetic analyses within tropical Northern Australia, presumably the main point of contact for Sunda lineages. Here, we characterise and compare...

Microhabitat partitioning correlates with opsin gene expression in coral reef cardinalfishes (Apogonidae)

Martin Luehrmann, Fabio Cortesi, Karen Cheney, Fanny De Busserolles & Justin Marshall
Fish are the most diverse vertebrate group, and they have evolved equally diverse visual systems, varying in terms of eye morphology, number and distribution of spectrally distinct photoreceptor types, visual opsin genes and opsin gene expression levels. This variation is mainly due to adaptations driven by two factors: differences in the light environments and behavioural tasks. However, while the effects of large-scale habitat differences are well described, it is less clear whether visual systems also...

Population genomic response to geographic gradients by widespread and endemic fishes of the Arabian Peninsula

Joseph DiBattista, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Marek Piatek, Fernando Cagua, Brian Bowen, John Choat, Luiz Rocha, Michelle Gaither, Jean-Paul Hobbs, Tane Sinclair-Taylor, Jennifer McIlwain, Mark Priest, Camrin Braun, Nigel Hussey, Steven Kessel & Michael Berumen
Genetic structure within marine species may be driven by local adaptation to their environment, or alternatively by historical processes, such as geographic isolation. The gulfs and seas bordering the Arabian Peninsula offer an ideal setting to examine connectivity patterns in coral reef fishes with respect to environmental gradients and vicariance. The Red Sea is characterized by a unique marine fauna, historical periods of desiccation and isolation, as well as environmental gradients in salinity, temperature, and...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    56

Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University of Queensland
    56
  • University of Washington
    3
  • The Nature Conservancy
    3
  • University of Tasmania
    3
  • Monash University
    3
  • Curtin University
    3
  • Queensland University of Technology
    3
  • University of California, Irvine
    3
  • Stanford University
    2
  • University of California, San Diego
    2