364 Works

Data from: Free‐moving artificial eggs containing temperature loggers reveal remarkable within‐clutch variance in incubation temperature

Sydney F. Hope, Sarah E. DuRant, John J. Hallagan, Michelle L. Beck, Robert A. Kennamer & William A. Hopkins
Incubation is a crucial aspect of avian parental care and measuring incubation temperature in the wild can improve our understanding of life history tradeoffs and inform conservation efforts. However, there are challenges associated with measuring the temperature of eggs in natural nests. Most studies to date have measured incubation temperature by using a single, stationary logger in each nest. However, real eggs are rotated and moved throughout the nest by the parent during the incubation...

Data from: The relative contribution of natural landscapes and human-mediated factors on the connectivity of a noxious invasive weed

Diego F. Alvarado-Serrano, Megan L. Van Etten, Shu-Mei Chang & Regina S. Baucom
Examining how the landscape may influence gene flow is at the forefront of understanding population differentiation and adaptation. Such understanding is crucial in light of ongoing environmental changes and the elevated risk of ecosystems alteration. In particular, knowledge of how humans may influence population structure is imperative to allow for informed decisions in management and conservation as well as to gain a better understanding of anthropogenic impacts on the interplay between gene flow, genetic drift...

Data from: Lifespan bias explains live-dead discordance in abundance of two common bivalves

Kelly E. Cronin, Gregory P. Dietl, Patricia H. Kelley & Stewart M. Edie
Lifespan bias potentially alters species abundance in death assemblages through the overrepresentation of short-lived organisms compared to their long-lived counterparts. Although previous work found that lifespan bias did not contribute significantly to live-dead discordance in bivalve assemblages, lifespan bias better explained discordance in two groups: longer-lived bivalve species and species with known lifespans. More studies using local, rather than global, species-wide, lifespans and mortality rates would help to determine the prevalence of lifespan bias, especially...

Data from: Machine learning to classify animal species in camera trap images: applications in ecology

Micheal A. Tabak, Mohammad Sadegh Norouzzadeh, Michael A. Tabak, David W. Wolfson, Steven J. Sweeney, Paul A. Di Salvo, Ryan S. Miller, Jesse S. Lewis, Mohammad S. Norouzzadeh, Jeff Clune, Ryan K. Brook, Elizabeth G. Mandeville, Paul M. Lukacs, Anna K. Moeller, Raoul K. Boughton, Bethany Wight, James C. Beasley & Peter E. Schlichting
Motion‐activated cameras (“camera traps”) are increasingly used in ecological and management studies for remotely observing wildlife and are amongst the most powerful tools for wildlife research. However, studies involving camera traps result in millions of images that need to be analysed, typically by visually observing each image, in order to extract data that can be used in ecological analyses. We trained machine learning models using convolutional neural networks with the ResNet‐18 architecture and 3,367,383 images...

Data from: Diet and trophic interactions of a circumglobally significant gelatinous marine zooplankter, Dolioletta gegenbauri (Uljanin, 1884)

Tina L. Walters, Lauren M. Lamboley, Natalia B. Lopez-Figueroa, Aurea E. Rodriguez-Santiago, Deidre M. Gibson & Marc E. Frischer
Gelatinous zooplankton play a crucial role in marine planktonic food webs. However, primarily due to methodological challenges, the in situ diet of zooplankton remains poorly investigated and little is known about their trophic interactions including feeding behavior, prey selection, and in situ feeding rates. This is particularly true for gelatinous zooplankton including the marine pelagic tunicate, Dolioletta gegenbauri. In this study, we applied an 18S rRNA amplicon metabarcoding approach to identify the diet of captive-fed...

Data from: Diversity and tectonics: predictions from neutral theory

Steven M. Holland
Numerical simulations of neutral metacommunities are used here to predict the effects of growth and shrinkage of metacommunities, as well as their separation and merging caused by continental collision and rifting and their secondary eustatic effects. Although growth and shrinkage of metacommunities predictably change diversity, separating and merging metacommunities have counterintuitive effects. Separating and merging metacommunities changes diversity within the individual areas, especially so for smaller areas, but they cause no change in total diversity...

Data from: Integrating phylogenomic and population genomic patterns in avian lice provides a more complete picture of parasite evolution

Andrew D. Sweet, Bret M. Boyd, Julie M. Allen, Scott M. Villa, Michel P. Valim, Jose L. Rivera-Parra, Robert E. Wilson & Kevin P. Johnson
Parasite diversity accounts for most of the biodiversity on earth, and is shaped by many processes (e.g. cospeciation, host-switching). To identify the effects of the processes that shape parasite diversity, it is ideal to incorporate both deep (phylogenetic) and shallow (population) perspectives. To this end, we developed a novel workflow to obtain phylogenetic and population genetic data from whole genome sequences of body lice parasitizing New World ground-doves. Phylogenies from these data showed consistent, highly...

Data from: Host immunity, nutrition and coinfection alter longitudinal infection patterns of schistosomes in a free ranging African buffalo population

Mireya Smith, Anna E. Jolles, Paul L. A. M. Corstjens, Brianna R. Beechler, Govert J. Van Dam, Robert S. Spaan, Sarah A. Budischak, Michelle L. Steinauer & Vanessa O. Ezenwa
Schistosomes are trematode parasites of global importance, causing infections in millions of people, livestock, and wildlife. Most studies on schistosomiasis, involve human subjects; as such, there is a paucity of longitudinal studies investigating parasite dynamics in the absence of intervention. As a consequence, despite decades of research on schistosomiasis, our understanding of its ecology in natural host populations is centered around how environmental exposure and acquired immunity influence acquisition of parasites, while very little is...

Data from: Undocumented beetle diversity in the Southeastern United States: a case study of the minute clubbed beetles (Coleoptera: Monotomidae)

Thomas C. McElrath & Joseph V. McHugh
Studies of the saproxylic and predatory beetle family Monotomidae (Coleoptera: Cucujoidea) in the southeastern USA increased the known diversity for the family in the state of Georgia by one genus and nine species. Online records of Monotomidae from Georgia increased from 0 to 885. This work highlights the lack of basic diversity information about small beetles that inhabit wood, leaf litter, and other decaying plant matter in this region.

Data from: A fast-evolving X-linked duplicate of importin-α2 is overexpressed in sex-ratio drive in Drosophila neotestacea

Kathleen E. Pieper, Robert L. Unckless & Kelly A. Dyer
Selfish genetic elements that manipulate gametogenesis to achieve a transmission advantage are known as meiotic drivers. Sex-ratio X-chromosomes (SR) are meiotic drivers that prevent the maturation of Y-bearing sperm in male carriers to result in the production of mainly female progeny. The spread of an SR chromosome can affect host genetic diversity and genome evolution, and can even cause host extinction if it reaches sufficiently high prevalence. Meiotic drivers have evolved independently many times, though...

Data from: A study of the transit amplification divisions during spermatogenesis in Oncopeltus fasciatus to assess plasticity in sperm numbers or sperm viability under different diets

Ashley E. Duxbury, Brandie Weathersby, Zachary Sanchez & Patricia J. Moore
Oncopeltus fasciatus males fed the ancestral diet of milkweed seeds prioritize reproduction over lifespan as evidenced by higher rates of fertility and shorter lifespans than males from the same population fed the adapted diet of sunflower seeds. We examined the proximate mechanisms by which milkweed-fed males maintained late-life fertility. We tested the hypothesis that older milkweed-fed males maintained fertility by producing more, higher quality sperm. Our results, that older males have more sperm, but their...

Data from: Disruption of plant-soil-microbial relationships influences plant growth

Daniel P. Keymer & Richard A. Lankau
Differential dispersal of plant and microbial propagules may result in the geographical disassociation of plant populations from their local abiotic conditions and microbial communities, especially in the face of species introductions and changing climates. To assess the potential consequences of disrupting historical relationships between plant populations, microbial communities, and soil conditions, we grew Carpinus caroliniana seedlings from populations across the species range in combinations of sterilized soils and soil microbial communities, in soils collected from...

Data from: Maternal corticosterone exposure has transgenerational effects on grand-offspring

Nicola Khan, Richard A. Peters, Emily Richardson & Kylie A. Robert
The hormone fluctuations that an animal experiences during ovulation can have lifelong effects on developing offspring. These hormones may act as an adaptive mechanism, allowing offspring to be ‘pre-programmed’ to survive in an unstable environment. Here, we used a transgenerational approach to examine the effects of elevated maternal corticosterone (CORT) on the future reproductive success of female offspring. We show that female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) exposed to embryonic CORT produce daughters that have equal...

Data from: Time to extinction in deteriorating environments

Katherine Zarada & John M. Drake
Habitat degradation and destruction are the predominant drivers of population extinction, but there is little theory to guide the analysis of population viability in deteriorating environments. To address this gap, we investigated extinction times in time-varying, demographically stochastic versions of the logistic model for population dynamics. A property of these models is the “extinction delay,” a quantitative measure of the time lag in extinction created by species-specific extinction debt. For completeness, three models were constructed...

Data from: Mosquitoes host communities of bacteria that are essential for development but vary greatly between local habitats

Kerri L. Coon, Mark R. Brown & Michael R. Strand
Mosquitoes are insects of interest because several species vector disease-causing pathogens to humans and other vertebrates. We previously reported that mosquitoes from long-term laboratory cultures require living bacteria in their gut to develop, but development does not depend on particular species of bacteria. Here, we focused on three distinct but interrelated areas of study to better understand the role of bacteria in mosquito development by studying field and laboratory populations of Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus...

Data from: The evolution of coexistence: reciprocal adaptation promotes the assembly of a simple community

Ronald D. Bassar, Troy Simon, William Roberts, Joseph Travis & David N. Reznick
Species coexistence may result by chance when co-occurring species do not strongly interact or it may be an evolutionary outcome of strongly interacting species adapting to each other. While patterns like character displacement indicate that coexistence has often been an evolutionary outcome, it is unclear how often the evolution of coexistence represents adaptation in only one species or reciprocal adaptation among all interacting species. Here we demonstrate a strong role for evolution in the coexistence...

Data from: Range-wide and regional patterns of population structure and genetic diversity in the gopher tortoise

Daniel Gaillard, Joshua R. Ennen, Brian R. Kreiser, Carl P. Qualls, Sarah C. Sweat, Roger Birkhead, Tracey D. Tuberville, Matthew Aresco, Earl D. McCoy, Henry R. Mushinsky, Thomas W. Hentges, D. Gaillard, B.R. Kreiser, C.P. Qualls, R. Birkhead, T.D. Tuberville, E.D. McCoy, H.R. Mushinsky & T.W. Hentges
The gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) has experienced dramatic population declines throughout its distribution in the southeastern United States and is federally listed as threatened in the area west of the Tombigbee-Mobile Rivers. While there is molecular support for recognizing the listed portion of the range as genetically distinct, other research has suggested that additional population structure exists at both range-wide and regional scales. In this study, we sought to comprehensively define structure at both spatial...

Data from: Early antiretroviral therapy and potent second-line drugs could decrease HIV incidence of drug resistance

Mingwang Shen, Yanni Xiao, Libin Rong, Lauren Ancel Meyers, Steve E. Bellan & Steven E. Bellan
Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces the risk of drug-sensitive HIV transmission but may increase the transmission of drug-resistant HIV. We used a mathematical model to estimate the long-term population-level benefits of ART and determine the scenarios under which earlier ART (treatment at 1 year post-infection, on average) could decrease simultaneously both total and drug-resistant HIV incidence (new infections). We constructed an infection-age-structured mathematical model that tracked the transmission rates over the course of...

Data from: Genome-wide analysis of allele frequency change in sunflower crop-wild hybrid populations evolving under natural conditions

Jonathan Corbi, Eric J. Baack, Jennifer M. Dechaine, Gerald Seiler & John M. Burke
Crop-wild hybridization occurs in numerous plant species, and could alter the genetic structure and evolutionary dynamics of wild populations. Studying crop-derived alleles in wild populations is also relevant to assessing/mitigating the risks associated with transgene escape. To date, crop-wild hybridization has generally been examined via short-term studies, typically within a single generation, focusing on few traits or genetic markers. Little is known about patterns of selection on crop-derived alleles over multiple generations, particularly at a...

Data from: Combined effects of night warming and light pollution on predator-prey interactions

Colleen R. Miller, Brandon T. Barton, Likai Zhu, Volker C. Radeloff, Kerry M. Oliver, Jason P. Harmon & Anthony R. Ives
Interactions between multiple anthropogenic environmental changes can drive non-additive effects in ecological systems, and the non-additive effects can in turn be amplified or dampened by spatial covariation among environmental changes. We investigated the combined effects of night-time warming and light pollution on pea aphids and two predatory ladybeetle species. As expected, neither night-time warming nor light pollution changed the suppression of aphids by the ladybeetle species that forages effectively in darkness. However, for the more-visual...

Data from: Regional and environmental variation in escalatory ecological trends during the Jurassic: a western Tethys hotspot for escalation?

Pedro M. Monarrez, Martin Aberhan & Steven M. Holland
Understanding the drivers of macroevolutionary trends through the Phanerozoic has been a central question in paleobiology. Increasingly important is understanding the regional and environmental variation of macroevolutionary patterns and how they are reflected at the global scale. Here we test the role of biotic interactions on regional ecological patterns during the Mesozoic marine revolution. We test for escalatory trends in Jurassic marine benthic macroinvertebrate ecosystems using occurrence data from the Paleobiology Database parsed by region...

Data from: When environmental factors become stressors: interactive effects of vermetid gastropods and sedimentation on corals

Julie Zill, Michael A. Gil, Craig W. Osenberg & Julie A. Zill
Environmental stressors often interact, but most studies of multiple stressors have focused on combinations of abiotic stressors. Here we examined the potential interaction between a biotic stressor, the vermetid snail Ceraesignum maximum, and an abiotic stressor, high sedimentation, on the growth of reef-building corals. In a field experiment, we subjected juvenile massive Porites corals to four treatments: (i) neither stressor, (ii) sedimentation, (iii) vermetids or (iv) both stressors. Unexpectedly, we found no effect of either...

Data from: Generalized spatial mark-resight models with an application to grizzly bears

Jesse Whittington, Mark Hebblewhite & Richard B. Chandler
1. The high cost associated with capture-recapture studies presents a major challenge when monitoring and managing wildlife populations. Recently-developed spatial mark-resight (SMR) models were proposed as a cost-effective alternative because they only require a single marking event. However, existing SMR models ignore the marking process and make the tenuous assumption that marked and unmarked populations have the same encounter probabilities. This assumption will be violated in most situations because the marking process results in different...

Data from: Adaptive divergence in wine yeasts and their wild relatives suggests a prominent role for introgressions and rapid evolution at non coding sites

Pedro Almeida, Raquel Barbosa, Douda Bensasson, Paula Gonçalves & José Paulo Sampaio
In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main yeast in wine fermentation, the opportunity to examine divergence at the molecular level between a domesticated lineage and its wild counterpart arose recently due to the identification of the closest relatives of wine strains, a wild population associated with Mediterranean oaks. Since genomic data is available for a considerable number of representatives belonging to both groups, we used population genomics to estimate the degree and distribution of nucleotide variation between...

Data from: Big biology meets microclimatology: Defining thermal niches of ectotherms at landscape scales for conservation planning

Daniel J. Isaak, Seth J. Wenger & Michael K. Young
Temperature profoundly affects ecology, a fact ever more evident as the ability to measure thermal environments increases and global changes alter these environments. The spatial structure of thermalscapes is especially relevant to the distribution and abundance of ectothermic organisms but the ability to describe biothermal relationships at extents and grains relevant to conservation planning has been limited by small or sparse datasets. Here, we combine a large occurrence database of >23,000 aquatic species surveys with...

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