57 Works

Data from: Comparative analysis of ear-hole closure identifies epimorphic regeneration as a discrete trait in mammals

Thomas R. Gawriluk, Jennifer Simkin, Katherine L. Thompson, Shishir K. Biswas, Zak Clare-Salzler, John M. Kimani, Stephen G. Kiama, Jeramiah J. Smith, Vanessa O. Ezenwa & Ashley W. Seifert
Why mammals have poor regenerative ability has remained a long-standing question in biology. In regenerating vertebrates, injury can induce a process known as epimorphic regeneration to replace damaged structures. Using a 4-mm ear punch assay across multiple mammalian species, here we show that several Acomys spp. (spiny mice) and Oryctolagus cuniculus completely regenerate tissue, whereas other rodents including MRL/MpJ ‘healer’ mice heal similar injuries by scarring. We demonstrate ear-hole closure is independent of ear size,...

Data from: Local adaptation of fish consumers alters primary production through changes in algal community composition and diversity

Ron D. Bassar, Brynne L. Bryan, Michael C. Marshall, Catherine M. Pringle, David N. Reznick, Joseph Travis & Ronald D. Bassar
Ecological research has focused on understanding how changes in consumer abundance affect community structure and ecosystem processes. However, there is increasing evidence that evolutionary changes in consumers can also alter community structure and ecosystem processes. Typically, the effects of consumer phenotype on communities and ecosystem processes are measured as net effects that integrate numerous ecological pathways. Here, we analyze new data from experimental manipulations of Trinidadian guppy Poecilia reticulata presence, density and phenotype to examine...

Data from: Development of microsatellite markers for buffalograss (Buchloë dactyloides; Poaceae), a drought-tolerant turfgrass alternative

Jacob J. Hadle, Lauren A. Konrade, Rochelle R. Beasley, Stacey L. Lance, Kenneth L. Jones & James B. Beck
Premise of the study: Buchloë dactyloides is an important component of Great Plains prairies and a popular drought-tolerant turfgrass alternative in North America. This species comprises an autopolyploid series, and microsatellite primers were developed in order to understand the distribution of genetic variation among cytotypes and across its large geographic range. Methods and Results: Fifteen microsatellite loci were designed and successfully amplified in six B. dactyloides populations. Within-population genetic diversity was comparatively high, consistent with...

Data from: The unexpected mating system of the androdioecious barnacle Chelonibia testudinaria (Linnaeus, 1758)

Christine Ewers-Saucedo, Neva B. Hope, John P. Wares & Christine Ewers
Androdioecy was first described by Darwin in his seminal work on barnacle diversity; he identified males and hermaphrodites in the same reproductive population. Today, we realize that many androdioecious plants and animals share astonishing similarities, particularly with regard to their evolutionary history and mating system. Notably, these species were ancestrally dioecious, and their mating system has the following characteristics: hermaphrodites self-fertilize frequently, males are more successful in large mating groups, and males have a mating...

Data from: Reciprocal relationships between behaviour and parasites suggest that negative feedback may drive flexibility in male reproductive behaviour

Vanessa O. Ezenwa & Matthew H. Snider
Parasites are ubiquitous components of the environment that contribute to behavioral and life-history variation among hosts. Although it’s well-known that host behavior can affect parasite infection risk and that parasites can alter host behavior, the potential for dynamic feedback between these processes is poorly characterized. Using Grant’s gazelle (Nanger granti) as a model, we tested for reciprocal effects of behavior on parasites and parasites on behavior to understand whether behavior-parasite feedback could play a role...

Data from: Specificity of multi-modal aphid defenses against two rival parasitoids

Adam J. Martinez, Kyungsun L. Kim, Jason P. Harmon & Kerry M. Oliver
Insects are often attacked by multiple natural enemies, imposing dynamic selective pressures for the development and maintenance of enemy-specific resistance. Pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) have emerged as models for the study of variation in resistance against natural enemies, including parasitoid wasps. Internal defenses against their most common parasitoid wasp, Aphidius ervi, are sourced through two known mechanisms– 1) endogenously encoded resistance or 2) infection with the heritable bacterial symbiont, Hamiltonella defensa. Levels of resistance can...

Data from: Reproductive isolation and introgression between sympatric Mimulus species

Amanda M. Kenney & Andrea L. Sweigart
Incompletely isolated species provide an opportunity to investigate the genetic mechanisms and evolutionary forces that maintain distinct species in the face of ongoing gene flow. Here, we use field surveys and reduced representation sequencing to characterize the patterns of reproductive isolation, admixture and genomic divergence between populations of the outcrossing wildflower Mimulus guttatus and selfing M. nasutus. Focusing on a single site where these two species have come into secondary contact, we find that phenological...

Data from: Larval food quantity affects the capacity of adult mosquitoes to transmit human malaria

Lillian L. M. Shapiro, Courtney C. Murdock, Gregory R. Jacobs, Rachel J. Thomas & Matthew B. Thomas
Adult traits of holometabolous insects are shaped by conditions experienced during larval development, which might impact interactions between adult insect hosts and parasites. However, the ecology of larval insects that vector disease remains poorly understood. Here, we used Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes and the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, to investigate whether larval conditions affect the capacity of adult mosquitoes to transmit malaria. We reared larvae in two groups; one group received a standard laboratory rearing...

Data from: Fitness costs of herbicide resistance across natural populations of the common morning glory, Ipomoea purpurea

Megan L. Van Etten, Adam Kuester, Shu-Mei Chang & Regina S. Baucom
Although fitness costs associated with plant defensive traits are widely expected, they are not universally detected, calling into question their generality. Here we examine the potential for life history trade-offs associated with herbicide resistance by examining seed germination, root growth, and above-ground growth across 43 naturally occurring populations of Ipomoea purpurea that vary in their resistance to RoundUp®, the most commonly used herbicide worldwide. We find evidence for life history trade-offs associated with all three...

Data from: MycoDB, a global database of plant response to mycorrhizal fungi

V. Bala Chaudhary, Megan A. Rúa, Anita Antoninka, James D. Bever, Jeffery Cannon, Ashley Craig, Jessica Duchicela, Alicia Frame, Monique Gardes, Catherine Gehring, Michelle Ha, Miranda Hart, Jacob Hopkins, Baoming Ji, Nancy Collins Johnson, Wittaya Kaonongbua, Justine Karst, Roger T. Koide, Louis J. Lamit, James Meadow, Brook G. Milligan, John C. Moore, , Bridget Piculell, Blake Ramsby … & Jason D. Hoeksema
Plants form belowground associations with mycorrhizal fungi in one of the most common symbioses on Earth. However, few large-scale generalizations exist for the structure and function of mycorrhizal symbioses, as the nature of this relationship varies from mutualistic to parasitic and is largely context-dependent. We announce the public release of MycoDB, a database of 4,010 studies (from 438 unique publications) to aid in multi-factor meta-analyses elucidating the ecological and evolutionary context in which mycorrhizal fungi...

Data from: The tale of the shrinking weapon: seasonal changes in nutrition affect weapon size and sexual dimorphism, but not contemporary evolution

Christine W. Miller, Grant C. McDonald, Allen J. Moore, A. J. Moore, C. W. Miller & G. C. McDonald
Sexually selected traits are often highly variable in size within populations due to their close link with the physical condition of individuals. Nutrition has a large impact on physical condition, and thus, any seasonal changes in nutritional quality are predicted to alter the average size of sexually selected traits as well as the degree of sexual dimorphism in populations. However, although traits affected by mate choice are well studied, we have a surprising lack of...

Data from: Gα and regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) protein pairs maintain functional compatibility and conserved interaction interfaces throughout evolution despite frequent loss of RGS proteins in plants

Dieter Hackenberg, Michael McKain, Soon-Goo Lee, Swarup Roy Choudhury, Tyler McCann, Spencer Schreier, Alex Harkess, J. Chris Pires, Gane Ka-Shu Wong, Joseph Jez, Elizabeth Kellogg, Sona Pandey, Soon Goo Lee, Joseph M. Jez, Michael R. McKain & Elizabeth A. Kellogg
Signaling pathways regulated by heterotrimeric G-proteins exist in all eukaryotes. The regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins are key interactors and critical modulators of the Gα protein of the heterotrimer. However, while G-proteins are widespread in plants, RGS proteins have been reported to be missing from the entire monocot lineage, with two exceptions. A single amino acid substitution-based adaptive coevolution of the Gα:RGS proteins was proposed to enable the loss of RGS in monocots. We...

Data from: A resurrection experiment finds evidence of both reduced genetic diversity and potential adaptive evolution in the agricultural weed Ipomoea purpurea

Adam Kuester, Ariana Wilson, Shu-Mei Chang & Regina S. Baucom
Despite the negative economic and ecological impact of weeds, relatively little is known about the evolutionary mechanisms that influence their persistence in agricultural fields. Here, we use a resurrection approach to examine the potential for genotypic and phenotypic evolution in Ipomoea purpurea, an agricultural weed that is resistant to glyphosate, the most widely used herbicide in current-day agriculture. We found striking reductions in allelic diversity between cohorts sampled nine years apart (2003 vs. 2012), suggesting...

Data from: Stability and generalization in seed dispersal networks: a case study of frugivorous fish in Neotropical wetlands

Sandra Bibiana Correa, Joisiane K. Araujo, Jerry Penha, Catia Nunes Da Cunha, Karen E. Bobier, Jill T. Anderson & Joisiane K. Arujo
When species within guilds perform similar ecological roles, functional redundancy can buffer ecosystems against species loss. Using data on the frequency of interactions between fish and fruit, we assessed whether co-occurring frugivores provide redundant seed dispersal services in three species-rich Neotropical wetlands. Our study revealed that frugivorous fishes have generalized diets; however, large-bodied fishes had greater seed dispersal breadth than small species, in some cases, providing seed dispersal services not achieved by smaller fish species....

Data from: Disruption of plant-soil-microbial relationships influences plant growth

Daniel P. Keymer & Richard A. Lankau
Differential dispersal of plant and microbial propagules may result in the geographical disassociation of plant populations from their local abiotic conditions and microbial communities, especially in the face of species introductions and changing climates. To assess the potential consequences of disrupting historical relationships between plant populations, microbial communities, and soil conditions, we grew Carpinus caroliniana seedlings from populations across the species range in combinations of sterilized soils and soil microbial communities, in soils collected from...

Data from: Maternal corticosterone exposure has transgenerational effects on grand-offspring

Nicola Khan, Richard A. Peters, Emily Richardson & Kylie A. Robert
The hormone fluctuations that an animal experiences during ovulation can have lifelong effects on developing offspring. These hormones may act as an adaptive mechanism, allowing offspring to be ‘pre-programmed’ to survive in an unstable environment. Here, we used a transgenerational approach to examine the effects of elevated maternal corticosterone (CORT) on the future reproductive success of female offspring. We show that female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) exposed to embryonic CORT produce daughters that have equal...

Data from: Time to extinction in deteriorating environments

Katherine Zarada & John M. Drake
Habitat degradation and destruction are the predominant drivers of population extinction, but there is little theory to guide the analysis of population viability in deteriorating environments. To address this gap, we investigated extinction times in time-varying, demographically stochastic versions of the logistic model for population dynamics. A property of these models is the “extinction delay,” a quantitative measure of the time lag in extinction created by species-specific extinction debt. For completeness, three models were constructed...

Data from: Mosquitoes host communities of bacteria that are essential for development but vary greatly between local habitats

Kerri L. Coon, Mark R. Brown & Michael R. Strand
Mosquitoes are insects of interest because several species vector disease-causing pathogens to humans and other vertebrates. We previously reported that mosquitoes from long-term laboratory cultures require living bacteria in their gut to develop, but development does not depend on particular species of bacteria. Here, we focused on three distinct but interrelated areas of study to better understand the role of bacteria in mosquito development by studying field and laboratory populations of Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus...

Data from: The evolution of coexistence: reciprocal adaptation promotes the assembly of a simple community

Ronald D. Bassar, Troy Simon, William Roberts, Joseph Travis & David N. Reznick
Species coexistence may result by chance when co-occurring species do not strongly interact or it may be an evolutionary outcome of strongly interacting species adapting to each other. While patterns like character displacement indicate that coexistence has often been an evolutionary outcome, it is unclear how often the evolution of coexistence represents adaptation in only one species or reciprocal adaptation among all interacting species. Here we demonstrate a strong role for evolution in the coexistence...

Data from: A phylogenomic assessment of ancient polyploidy and genome evolution across the Poales

Michael R. McKain, Haibao Tang, Joel R. McNeal, Saravanaraj Ayyampalayam, Jerrold I. Davis, Claude W. DePamphilis, Thomas J. Givnish, J. Chris Pires, Dennis Wm. Stevenson & Jim H. Leebens-Mack
Comparisons of flowering plant genomes reveal multiple rounds of ancient polyploidy characterized by large intra-genomic syntenic blocks. Three such whole genome duplication (WGD) events, designated as rho (ρ), sigma (σ), and tau (τ), have been identified in the genomes of cereal grasses. Precise dating of these WGD events is necessary to investigate how they have influenced diversification rates, evolutionary innovations, and genomic characteristics such as the GC profile of protein coding sequences. The timing of...

Data from: Experimental insight into the process of parasite community assembly

Sarah A. Budischak, Eric P. Hoberg, Art Abrams, Anna E. Jolles & Vanessa O. Ezenwa
1.Community assembly is a fundamental process that has long been a central focus in ecology. Extending community assembly theory to communities of co-infecting parasites, we used a gastrointestinal nematode removal experiment in free-ranging African buffalo to examine community assembly patterns and processes. 2.We first asked whether reassembled communities differ from undisturbed communities by comparing anthelmintic-treated and control hosts. Next, we examined the temporal dynamics of assembly using a cross-section of communities that reassembled for different...

Data from: Biparental care is predominant and beneficial to parents in the burying beetle Nicrophorus orbicollis (Coleoptera: Silphidae)

Kyle M. Benowitz & Allen J. Moore
Parenting strategies can be flexible within a species and may have varying fitness effects. Understanding this flexibility and its fitness consequences is important for understanding why parenting strategies evolve. In the present study, we investigate the fitness consequences of flexible parenting in the burying beetle Nicrophorus orbicollis, a species known for its advanced provisioning behaviour of regurgitated vertebrate carrion to offspring by both sexes. We show that, even when a parent is freely allowed to...

Data from: Genetic mapping of millions of SNPs in safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) via whole-genome resequencing

John E. Bowers, Stephanie A. Pearl & John M. Burke
Accurate assembly of complete genomes is facilitated by very high density genetic maps. We performed low-coverage, whole-genome shotgun sequencing on 96 F6 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of a cross between safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) and its wild progenitor (C. palaestinus Eig). We also produced a draft genome assembly of C. tinctorius covering 866 million bp (∼two-thirds) of the expected 1.35 Gbp genome after sequencing a single, short insert library to ∼21 × depth. Sequence reads...

Data from: The response of migratory populations to phenological change: a Migratory Flow Network modelling approach

Caz M. Taylor, Andrew J. Laughlin & Richard J. Hall
1. Declines in migratory species have been linked to anthropogenic climate change through phenological mismatch, which arises due to asynchronies between the timing of life-history events (such as migration) and the phenology of available resources. Long-distance migratory species may be particularly vulnerable to phenological change in their breeding ranges, since the timing of migration departure is based on environmental cues at distant non-breeding sites. 2. Migrants may, however, be able to adjust migration speed en...

Data from: Genetic by environmental variation but no local adaptation in oysters (Crassostrea virginica)

A. Randall Hughes, Torrance C. Hanley, James E. Byers, Jonathan H. Grabowski, Jennafer C. Malek, Micahel F. Piehler, David L. Kimbro & Michael F. Piehler
Functional trait variation within and across populations can strongly influence population, community, and ecosystem processes, but the relative contributions of genetic vs. environmental factors to this variation are often not clear, potentially complicating conservation and restoration efforts. For example, local adaptation, a particular type of genetic by environmental (G*E) interaction in which the fitness of a population in its own habitat is greater than in other habitats, is often invoked in management practices, even in...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    57

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    57

Affiliations

  • University of Georgia
    57
  • Donald Danforth Plant Science Center
    4
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    4
  • University of Missouri
    4
  • Oregon State University
    3
  • University of North Carolina
    2
  • University of Alberta
    2
  • Australian National University
    2
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    2
  • University of Tasmania
    2