282 Works

River restoration practitioner survey on engineering design for climate change

Desirée Tullos
An online survey of river restoration practitioners, engineers, and researchers was conducted to examine current practices and perspectives on how climate change is integrated into engineering designs for river restoration. Seventy-six responses were submitted to the survey. While the responses came from a wide range of demographies, respondents were most commonly men, age 35-44, with professional degrees working as practitioners in consulting firms. The most frequent respondents work in engineering or engineering geomorphology in the...

Data from: Deer-mediated ecosystem service vs. disservice depends on forest management intensity

Thomas D. Stokely & Matthew G. Betts
MANUSCRIPT ABSTRACT As global terrestrial biodiversity declines via land-use intensification, society has placed increasing value on non-commercial species as providers of ecosystem services. Yet, many deer species and non-crop plants are perceived negatively when they decrease crop productivity, leading to reduced economic gains and human-wildlife conflict. We hypothesized that deer provide an ecosystem service in forest plantations by controlling competition and promoting crop-tree growth, although the effects of herbivory may depend on forest management intensity....

Species delimitation, classical taxonomy, and genome skimming: a review of the ground beetle genus Lionepha (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

David Maddison & John Sproul
The western North American genus Lionepha is shown to contain at least 11 species through a combination of eight-gene species delimitation analyses and morphological study. In order to confirm the names of several species, we sequence DNA of primary types of several names, including a LeConte lectotype collected in the 1850s, using next-generation sequencing. We examine chromosomes of eight species, and show that all have 12 pairs of autosomes and an X0/XX sex-chromosome system. The...

A program for finding some reduced spherical pictures

Matthias C. Merzenich

Stream metabolism and suspended sediment concentration data from two streams in the Oregon Coast Range

Catalina Segura, Samantha Cargill & Dana Warren

Modeling of an Urban Radiocesium Pathway from Catchment to Wastewater Treatment Sludge - Dataset

George MH NG
This archive is a compilation of SWMM input files and STELLA models, augmented by R scripts to perform various processing for sensitivity analysis, data import / export, plot generation and computation of various summary outputs. Part I is the sensitivity analysis of a SWMM model representative of the case study in Urso et al (2013). An extended Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Testing (eFAST) work flow for this SWMM model is implemented in R script. Part II...

Persistence of an endangered native duck, feral mallards, and multiple hybrid swarms across the main Hawaiian Islands

Caitlin Wells, Philip Lavretsky, Michael Sorenson, Jeffrey Peters, Jeffrey DaCosta, Stephen Turnbull, Kimberly Uyehara, Christopher Malachowski, Bruce Dugger, John Eadie & Andrew Engilis
Interspecific hybridization is recognized as an important process in the evolutionary dynamics of both speciation and the reversal of speciation. However, our understanding of the spatial and temporal patterns of hybridization that erode versus promote species boundaries is incomplete. The endangered, endemic koloa maoli (or Hawaiian duck, Anas wyvilliana) is thought to be threatened with genetic extinction through ongoing hybridization with an introduced congener, the feral mallard (A. platyrhynchos). We investigated spatial and temporal variation...

Data from: Patterns of annual and seasonal immune investment in a temporal reproductive opportunist

Elizabeth Schultz, Christian Gunning, Jamie Cornelius, Dustin Reichard, Kirk Klasing & Thomas Hahn
Historically, investigations of how organismal investments in immunity fluctuate in response to environmental and physiological changes have focused on seasonally breeding organisms that confine reproduction to seasons with mild environmental conditions and abundant resources. The red crossbill, Loxia curvirostra, is a songbird that can breed opportunistically if conifer seeds are abundant, on both short, cold, and long, warm days, providing an ideal system to investigate interactions between immunity, reproduction, and environmental fluctuations. In this study,...

Data from: Passive acoustic monitoring effectively detects Northern Spotted Owls and Barred Owls over a range of forest conditions

Leila S. Duchac, Damon B. Lesmeister, Katie M. Dugger, Zachary J. Ruff & Raymond J. Davis
Passive acoustic monitoring using autonomous recording units (ARUs) is a fast-growing area of wildlife research especially for rare, cryptic species that vocalize. Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) populations have been monitored since the mid-1980s using mark-recapture methods. To evaluate an alternative survey method, we used ARUs to detect calls of Northern Spotted Owls and Barred Owls (S. varia), a congener that has expanded its range into the Pacific Northwest and threatens Northern Spotted Owl...

Patterns of annual and seasonal immune investment in a temporal reproductive opportunist

Elizabeth Schultz, Christian Gunning, Jamie Cornelius, Dustin Reichard, Kirk Klasing & Thomas Hahn
Historically, investigations of how organismal investments in immunity fluctuate in response to environmental and physiological changes have focused on seasonally breeding organisms that confine reproduction to seasons with relatively unchallenging environmental conditions and abundant resources. The red crossbill, Loxia curvirostra, is a songbird that can breed opportunistically if conifer seeds are abundant, on both short, cold, and long, warm days, providing an ideal system to investigate environmental and reproductive effects on immunity. In this study,...

Data from: Depth dependent dive kinematics suggest cost-efficient foraging strategies by tiger sharks

Samantha Andrzejaczek, Adrian Gleiss, Karissa Lear, Charitha Pattiaratchi, Taylor Chapple & Mark Meekan
Tiger sharks Galeocerdo cuvier are a keystone, top-order predator that are assumed to engage in cost-efficient movement and foraging patterns. To investigate the extent to which patterns of oscillatory diving by these animals conform to these patterns, we used a biologging approach to model their cost of transport. High-resolution biologging tags with tri-axial sensors were deployed on 21 tiger sharks at Ningaloo Reef for durations of 5-48 hours. Using overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA) as...

Data from: Addressing incomplete lineage sorting and paralogy in the inference of uncertain salmonid phylogenetic relationships

Matthew Campbell, Thaddaeus Buser, Michael Alfaro & J. Andres Lopez
Recent and continued progress in the scale and sophistication of phylogenetic research has yielded substantial advances in knowledge of the tree of life; however, segments of that tree remain unresolved and continue to produce contradicting or unstable results. These poorly resolved relationships may be the product of methodological shortcomings or of an evolutionary history that did not generate the signal traits needed for its eventual reconstruction. Relationships within the euteleost fish family Salmonidae have proven...

Data from: Genomes of diverse isolates of the marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus

Steven J. Biller, Paul M. Berube, Jessie W. Berta-Thompson, Libusha Kelly, Sara E. Roggensack, Lana Awad, Kathryn H. Roache-Johnson, Huiming Ding, Stephen J. Giovannoni, Lisa R. Moore & Sallie W. Chisholm
The marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus is the numerically dominant photosynthetic organism in the oligotrophic oceans, and a model system in marine microbial ecology. Here we report 27 new whole genome sequences (2 complete and closed; 25 of draft quality) of cultured isolates, representing five major phylogenetic clades of Prochlorococcus. The sequenced strains were isolated from diverse regions of the oceans, facilitating studies of the drivers of microbial diversity—both in the lab and in the field. To...

Data from: Optimal nutrient exchange and immune responses operate in partner specificity in the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis

Jennifer L. Matthews, Camerron M. Crowder, Clinton A. Oakley, Adrian Lutz, Ute Roessner, Eli Meyer, Arthur R. Grossman, Virginia M. Weis & Simon K. Davy
The relationship between reef-building corals and phototrophic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium is fundamental to the functioning of coral reef ecosystems. It has been suggested that reef corals may adapt to climate change by changing their dominant symbiont type to a more thermally tolerant one, although the capacity for such a community shift is potentially hindered by the compatibility of different host-symbiont pairings. Here we combined transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses to characterize the molecular, cellular,...

Data from: Shrub encroachment is linked to extirpation of an apex predator

Christopher E. Gordon, David J. Eldridge, William J. Ripple, Mathew S. Crowther, Ben D. Moore & Mike Letnic
The abundance of shrubs has increased throughout Earth's arid lands. This ‘shrub encroachment’ has been linked to livestock grazing, fire-suppression and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations facilitating shrub recruitment. Apex predators initiate trophic cascades which can influence the abundance of many species across multiple trophic levels within ecosystems. Extirpation of apex predators is linked inextricably to pastoralism, but has not been considered as a factor contributing to shrub encroachment. Here, we ask if trophic cascades triggered...

Data from: Spatial and temporal patterns of larval dispersal in a coral-reef fish metapopulation: evidence of variable reproductive success

Timothy J. Pusack, Mark R. Christie, Darren W. Johnson, Christopher D. Stallings & Mark A. Hixon
Many marine organisms can be transported hundreds of kilometers during their pelagic larval stage, yet little is known about spatial and temporal patterns of larval dispersal. Although traditional population-genetic tools can be applied to infer movement of larvae on an evolutionary time scale, large effective population sizes and high rates of gene-flow present serious challenges to documenting dispersal patterns over shorter, ecologically-relevant, time scales. Here, we address these challenges by combining direct parentage analysis and...

Data from: Long-term, high frequency in situ measurements of intertidal mussel bed temperatures using biomimetic sensors

Brian Helmuth, Francis Choi, Allison Matzelle, Jessica L. Torossian, Scott L. Morella, K. A. S. Mislan, Lauren Yamane, Denise Strickland, P. Lauren Szathmary, Sarah Gilman, Alyson Tockstein, Thomas J. Hilbish, Michael T. Burrows, Anne Marie Power, Elizabeth Gosling, Nova Mieszkowska, Christopher D. G. Harley, Michael Nishizaki, Emily Carrington, Bruce Menge, Laura Petes, Melissa M. Foley, Angela Johnson, Megan Poole, Mae M. Noble … & Gerardo Zardi
At a proximal level, the physiological impacts of global climate change on ectothermic organisms are manifest as changes in body temperatures. Especially for plants and animals exposed to direct solar radiation, body temperatures can be substantially different from air temperatures. We deployed biomimetic sensors that approximate the thermal characteristics of intertidal mussels at 71 sites worldwide, from 1998-present. Loggers recorded temperatures at 10–30 min intervals nearly continuously at multiple intertidal elevations. Comparisons against direct measurements...

Data from: Genetic variation in adaptive traits and seed transfer zones for Pseudoroegneria spicata (bluebunch wheatgrass) in the northwestern United States

John Bradley St. Clair, Francis F. Kilkenny, Richard C. Johnson, Nancy L. Shaw & George Weaver
A genecological approach was used to explore genetic variation in adaptive traits in Pseudoroegneria spicata, a key restoration grass, in the intermountain western United States. Common garden experiments were established at three contrasting sites with seedlings from two maternal parents from each of 114 populations along with five commercial releases commonly used in restoration. Traits associated with size, flowering phenology and leaf width varied considerably among populations and were moderately correlated to the climates of...

Data from: Species identification and likely catch time period of whale bones from South Georgia

Angela L. Sremba, Anthony R. Martin & C. Scott Baker
Skeletal remains of baleen whales killed during the onset of 20th century commercial whaling lie scattered across the shores and abandoned whaling stations of the subantarctic island of South Georgia. Here we report on genetic species identification of whale bones collected from South Georgia using standard historical DNA protocols. We amplified and sequenced short fragments of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region from 281 available bone samples. Of these, 231 provided mtDNA sequences of sufficient...

Ocean acidification stress index for shellfish (OASIS): Linking Pacific oyster larval survival and exposure to variable carbonate chemistry regimes

Iria Gimenez Calvo, George Waldbusser & Burke Hales
Understanding larval bivalve responses to variable regimes of seawater carbonate chemistry requires realistic quantification of physiological stress. Based on a degree-day modeling approach, we developed a new metric, the ocean acidification stress index for shellfish (OASIS), for this purpose. OASIS integrates over the entire larval period the instantaneous stress associated with deviations from published sensitivity thresholds to aragonite saturation state (ΩAr) while experiencing variable carbonate chemistry. We measured survival to D-hinge and pre-settlement stage of...

Abu Dhabi Blue Carbon project

Lisa Schile, J. Boone Kauffman, J. Patrick Megonigal, James Fourqurean & Stephen Crooks
Coastal ecosystems produce and sequester significant amounts of carbon (‘blue carbon’), which has been well documented in humid and semi-humid regions of temperate and tropical climates but less so in arid regions where mangroves, marshes, and seagrasses exist near the limit of their tolerance for extreme temperature and salinity. To better understand these unique systems, we measured whole-ecosystem carbon stocks (above- and belowground biomass and soil) in 58 sites across the United Arab Emirates in...

Data from: Phylogenomic analyses reveal a deep history of hybridization and polyploidy in the Neotropical genus Lachemilla (Rosaceae)

Diego F. Morales-Briones, Aaron Liston & David C. Tank
Hybridization, incomplete lineage sorting, and phylogenetic error produce similar incongruence patterns, representing a great challenge for phylogenetic reconstruction. Here, we use sequence capture data and multiple species tree and species network approaches to resolve the backbone phylogeny of the Neotropical genus Lachemilla, while distinguishing among sources of incongruence. We used 396 nuclear loci and nearly complete plastome sequences from 27 species to clarify the relationships among the major groups of Lachemilla, and explored multiple sources...

Data from: Are macroalgal blooms necessarily bad? Nutrient impacts on seagrass in upwelling-influenced estuaries

Margot L. Hessing-Lewis, Sally D. Hacker, Bruce A. Menge, Sea-Oh McConville & Jeremy Henderson
Knowledge of nutrient pathways and their resulting ecological interactions can alleviate numerous environmental problems associated with nutrient increases in both natural and managed systems. Although not unique, coastal systems are particularly prone to complex ecological interactions resulting from nutrient inputs from both the land and sea. Nutrient inputs to coastal systems often spur ulvoid macroalgal blooms, with negative consequences for seagrasses, primarily through shading, as well as through changes in local biogeochemistry. We conducted complementary...

Data from: Herbivory and eutrophication mediate grassland plant nutrient responses across a global climatic gradient

T. Michael Anderson, Daniel M. Griffith, James B. Grace, Eric M. Lind, Peter B. Adler, Lori A. Biederman, Dana M. Blumenthal, Pedro Daleo, Jennifer Firn, Nicole Hagenah, W. Stanley Harpole, Andrew S. MacDougall, Rebecca L. McCulley, Suzanne M. Prober, Anita C. Risch, Mahesh Sankaran, Martin Schütz, Eric W. Seabloom, Carly J. Stevens, Lauren L. Sullivan, Peter D. Wragg & Elizabeth T. Borer
Plant stoichiometry, the relative concentration of elements, is a key regulator of ecosystem functioning and is also being altered by human activities. In this paper we sought to understand the global drivers of plant stoichiometry and compare the relative contribution of climatic vs. anthropogenic effects. We addressed this goal by measuring plant elemental (C, N, P and K) responses to eutrophication and vertebrate herbivore exclusion at eighteen sites on six continents. Across sites, climate and...

Data from: Fungi ahoy! Diversity on marine wooden substrata in the high North

Teppo Rämä, Jenni Nordén, Marie L. Davey, Geir H. Mathiassen, Joseph W. Spatafora & Håvard Kauserud
Marine fungi are severely understudied in the polar regions. We used molecularly identified cultures to study fungi inhabiting 50 intertidal and sea-floor logs along the North Norwegian coast. The aim was to explore the taxonomic and ecological diversity and to examine factors shaping the marine wood-inhabiting fungal communities. The 577 pure cultures analyzed clustered into 147 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on 97 % ITS sequence similarity. Ascomycota dominated, but OTUs belonging to Basidiomycota, Mucoromycotina...

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