55 Works

Data from: Phenotypic and genetic integration of personality and growth under competition in the sheepshead swordtail, Xiphophorus birchmanni

Kay Boulton, Craig A. Walling, Andrew J. Grimmer, Gil G. Rosenthal, Alastair Wilson & Alastair J. Wilson
Competition for resources including food, physical space, and potential mates is a fundamental ecological process shaping variation in individual phenotype and fitness. The evolution of competitive ability, in particular social dominance, depends on genetic (co)variation among traits causal (e.g., behavior) or consequent (e.g., growth) to competitive outcomes. If dominance is heritable, it will generate both direct and indirect genetic effects (IGE) on resource-dependent traits. The latter are expected to impose evolutionary constraint because winners necessarily...

Data from: Maintaining their genetic distance: little evidence for introgression between widely hybridising species of Geum with contrasting mating systems

Crispin Y. Jordan, Konrad Lohse, Frances Turner, Marian Thomson, Karim Gharbi & Richard A. Ennos
Within the plant kingdom many genera contain sister lineages with contrasting outcrossing and inbreeding mating systems that are known to hybridise. The evolutionary fate of these sister lineages is likely to be influenced by the extent to which they exchange genes. We measured gene flow between outcrossing Geum rivale and selfing G. urbanum, sister species that hybridise in contemporary populations. We generated and used a draft genome of G. urbanum to develop dd-RAD data scorable...

Rural smallholder agricultural field management surveys across Mozambique

E. Woollen, C.M. Ryan, O. Nhaduco, A.A. Da Costa, C. Rodrigues, F. Armando, S. Baumert & P. Zorilla-Miras
This dataset comprises 259 smallholder agricultural field surveys collected from twenty-six villages across three Districts in Mozambique, Africa. Surveys were conducted in ten fields in each of six villages in Mabalane District, Gaza Province, ten villages in Marrupa District, Niassa Province, and ten villages in Gurue District, Zambezia Province. Data were collected in Mabalane between May-Sep 2014, Marrupa between May-Aug 2015, and Gurue between Sep-Dec 2015. Fields were selected based on their age, location, and...

Data from: Genome-wide evolutionary dynamics of influenza B viruses on a global scale

Pinky Langat, Jayna Raghwani, Gytis Dudas, Thomas A. Bowden, Stephanie Edwards, Astrid Gall, Trevor Bedford, Andrew Rambaut, Rodney S. Daniels, Colin A. Russell, Oliver G. Pybus, John McCauley, Paul Kellam & Simon J. Watson
The global-scale epidemiology and genome-wide evolutionary dynamics of influenza B remain poorly understood compared with influenza A viruses. We compiled a spatio-temporally comprehensive dataset of influenza B viruses, comprising over 2,500 genomes sampled worldwide between 1987 and 2015, including 382 newly-sequenced genomes that fill substantial gaps in previous molecular surveillance studies. Our contributed data increase the number of available influenza B virus genomes in Europe, Africa and Central Asia, improving the global context to study...

Data from: The effect of selection history on extinction risk during severe environmental change

Josianne Lachapelle, Nick Colegrave, Graham Bell, J. Lachapelle, N. Colegrave & G. Bell
Environments rarely remain the same over time, and populations are therefore frequently at risk of going extinct when changes are significant enough to reduce fitness. While many studies have investigated what attributes of the new environments and of the populations experiencing these changes will affect their probability of going extinct, limited work has been directed toward determining the role of population history on the probability of going extinct during severe environmental change. Here we compare...

Data from: Robust extraction of quantitative structural information from high-variance histological images of livers from necropsied Soay sheep

Quentin Caudron, Romain Garnier, Jill G. Pilkington, Kathryn A. Watt, Christina Hansen, Bryan T. Grenfell, Tawfik Aboellail, Andrea L. Graham, T. Aboellail, Q. Caudron, R. Garnier, A. L. Graham, B. T. Grenfell, C. Hansen, J. G. Pilkington & K. A. Watt
Quantitative information is essential to the empirical analysis of biological systems. In many such systems, spatial relations between anatomical structures is of interest, making imaging a valuable data acquisition tool. However, image data can be difficult to analyse quantitatively. Many image processing algorithms are highly sensitive to variations in the image, limiting their current application to fields where sample and image quality may be very high. Here, we develop robust image processing algorithms for extracting...

Data from: Nonlinear disease tolerance curves reveal distinct components of host responses to viral infection

Vanika Gupta & Pedro F. Vale
The ability to tolerate infection is a key component of host defence and offers potential novel therapeutic approaches for infectious diseases. To yield successful targets for therapeutic intervention, it is important that the analytical tools employed to measure disease tolerance are able to capture distinct host responses to infection. Here, we show that commonly used methods that estimate tolerance as a linear relationship should be complemented with more flexible, nonlinear estimates of this relationship which...

Data from: Sex differences in leucocyte telomere length in a free-living mammal

Rebecca L. Watson, Ellen J. Bird, Sarah Underwood, Rachael V. Adams, Jennifer Fairlie, Kathryn Watt, Eliane Salvo-Chirnside, Jill G. Pilkington, Josephine M. Pemberton, Tom N. McNeilly, Hannah Froy, Daniel H. Nussey & Rachael V. Wilbourn
Mounting evidence suggests that average telomere length reflects previous stress and predicts subsequent survival across vertebrate species. In humans, leucocyte telomere length (LTL) is consistently shorter during adulthood in males than in females, although the causes of this sex difference and its generality to other mammals remain unknown. Here, we measured LTL in a cross-sectional sample of free-living Soay sheep and found shorter telomeres in males than in females in later adulthood (>3 years of...

Data from: Fitness change in relation to mutation number in spontaneous mutation accumulation lines of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

Susanne A. Kraemer, Katharina B. Böndel, Robert W. Ness, Peter David Keightley, Nick Colegrave & Peter D. Keightley
Although all genetic variation ultimately stems from mutations, their properties are difficult to study directly. Here, we used multiple mutation accumulation (MA) lines derived from five genetic backgrounds of the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that have been previously subjected to whole genome sequencing to investigate the relationship between the number of spontaneous mutations and change in fitness from a non-evolved ancestor. MA lines were on average less fit than their ancestors and we detected a...

Data from: Why are flowers sweeter than fruits or buds? Variation in extrafloral nectar secretion throughout the floral ontogeny of a myrmecophile

Nora Villamil
Extrafloral nectar provision during floral ontogeny in ant-plants has not been widely studied. Extrafloral nectar secretion differed between leaves associated with buds, flowers, and fruits, and peaked during anthesis when pollinators were present. This ontogenetic variation may result from mixed selective pressures involving strategies for defense and mutualist management.

Data from: RADseq dataset with 90% missing data fully resolves recent radiation of Petalidium (Acanthaceae) in the ultra-arid deserts of Namibia

Erin A. Tripp, Yi-Hsin Erica Tsai, Yongbin Zhuang & Kyle G. Dexter
Deserts, even those at tropical latitudes, often have strikingly low levels of plant diversity, particularly within genera. One remarkable exception to this pattern is the genus Petalidium (Acanthaceae), in which 37 of 40 named species occupy one of the driest environments on Earth, the Namib Desert of Namibia and neighboring Angola. To contribute to understanding this enigmatic diversity, we generated RADseq data for 47 accessions of Petalidium representing 22 species. We explored the impacts of...

Data from: Prenatal maternal effects appear to be insensitive to experimental or natural environmental variation

Caroline E. Thomson & Jarrod D. Hadfield
1. In many birds, hatching asynchrony is a common phenomenon, primarily driven by patterns of incubation behaviour. However, experimental results in blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) have shown that asynchrony is reduced by intrinsic properties of later eggs that accelerate pre-natal development. 2. These intrinsic differences between early and late eggs could be driven by changes in resource availability to females, which are then passively passed onto the egg. Alternatively, it may be due to an...

Data from: Evolution of ischemic damage and behavioural deficit over 6 months after MCAo in the rat: selecting the optimal outcomes and statistical power for multi-centre preclinical trials

Sarah S. J. Rewell, Leonid Churilov, T. Kate Sidon, Elena Aleksoska, Susan F. Cox, Malcolm Robert Macleod, David W. Howells & Malcolm R. Macleod
Key disparities between the timing and methods of assessment in animal stroke studies and clinical trial may be part of the reason for the failure to translate promising findings. This study investigates the development of ischemic damage after thread occlusion MCAo in the rat, using histological and behavioural outcomes. Using the adhesive removal test we investigate the longevity of behavioural deficit after ischemic stroke in rats, and examine the practicality of using such measures as...

Tsetse trypanosome and endosymbiont data from Hurungwe District, Zimbabwe (2016)

M. Goodwin, F. Webber, L.C. Hamill, N.E. Anderson, W. Shereni, L. Nyakupinda, L.F. Gwenhure & E. Macleod
The data set includes the results of a laboratory analysis in 2016, investigating the presence of trypanosomes and prevalence of tsetse endosymbionts in tsetse flies. The tsetse flies were sampled in Hurungwe District, Mashonaland West Province, Zimbabwe, from February 2014 to November 2014. Flies were sampled using a combination of Epsilon traps and fly rounds, both established techniques for sampling tsetse. Tsetse were stored prior to laboratory analysis using Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques in...

Data from: Calcium dynamics regulating the timing of decision-making in C. elegans

Yuki Tanimoto, Akiko Yamazoe-Umemoto, Kosuke Fujita, Yuya Kawazoe, Yosuke Miyanishi, Shuhei J. Yamazaki, Xianfeng Fei, Karl Emanuel Busch, Keiko Gengyo-Ando, Junichi Nakai, Yuichi Iino, Yuishi Iwasaki, Koichi Hashimoto, Koutarou D. Kimura, Shuhei J Yamazaki & Koutarou D Kimura
Brains regulate behavioral responses with distinct timings. Here we investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the timing of decision-making during olfactory navigation in Caenorhabditis elegans. We find that, based on subtle changes in odor concentrations, the animals appear to choose the appropriate migratory direction from multiple trials as a form of behavioral decision-making. Through optophysiological, mathematical and genetic analyses of neural activity under virtual odor gradients, we further find that odor concentration information is...

Data from: The changing environment of conservation conflict: geese and farming in Scotland

Tom H. E. Mason, Aidan Keane, Stephen M. Redpath & Nils Bunnefeld
1.Conflict between conservation objectives and human livelihoods is ubiquitous and can be highly damaging, but the processes generating it are poorly understood. Ecological elements are central to conservation conflict, and changes in their dynamics – for instance due to anthropogenic environmental change – are likely to influence the emergence of serious human-wildlife impacts and, consequently, social conflict. 2.We used mixed-effects models to examine the drivers of historic spatio-temporal dynamics in numbers of Greenland barnacle geese...

Data from: The challenges of detecting subtle population structure and its importance for the conservation of emperor penguins

Jane L. Younger, Gemma V. Clucas, Damian Kao, Alex D. Rogers, Karim Gharbi, Tom Hart & Karen J. Miller
Understanding the boundaries of breeding populations is of great importance for conservation efforts and estimates of extinction risk for threatened species. However, determining these boundaries can be difficult when population structure is subtle. Emperor penguins are highly reliant on sea ice, and some populations may be in jeopardy as climate change alters sea-ice extent and quality. An understanding of emperor penguin population structure is therefore urgently needed. Two previous studies have differed in their conclusions,...

Paternity of Eschscholzia californica plants introduced to habitats comprising different floral cover

T.M. Evans, M.S. Heard, A.J. Vanbergen, S. Cavers & R. Ennos
This dataset details the paternity of progeny from Eschscholzia californica plants introduced to habitats comprising different floral cover. Data was collected in June 2015 at the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Plants were genotyped at seven microsatellite markers before being introduced across the study site to form experimental arrays. Experimental arrays comprised of three E.californica plants separated by 1m and arranged in a triangular formation. A total of sixteen arrays were introduced across four 100 hectare...

Structure and composition of woodlands across Mozambique

E. Woollen, C.M. Ryan, O. Nhaduco, I.A. Daude, A.A. Manguiao, A.A. Da Costa, S.N. Lisboa, J.F. Junior, L. Mutemba, A. Pais, M. Zavale, S. Cumbula, H. Xerinda, H. Buque, D. Meneses, C. Rodrigues, A.M. Mário, N. Ribeiro, L.P. Domingos, A. Mbandze, R. Stedham & P. Jennings
This dataset contains quantitative measurements of woodland structure and composition sampled in twenty-seven different villages across three Districts in Mozambique, Africa. Data were collected from 431 plots where tree stem structure and composition, litter and grass biomass, coarse woody debris, and canopy cover data were recorded. Woodlands within seven villages in Mabalane District, Gaza Province, ten villages in Marrupa District, Niassa Province, and ten villages in Gurue District Zambezia Province were sampled. Data were collected...

Data from: Planting exotic relatives has increased the threat posed by Dothistroma septosporum to the Caledonian pine populations of Scotland

Marta J. Piotrowska, Carolyn Riddell, Peter N. Hoebe & Richard A. Ennos
To manage emerging forest diseases and prevent their occurrence in the future, it is essential to determine the origin(s) of the pathogens involved and identify the management practices that have ultimately caused disease problems. One such practice is the widespread planting of exotic tree species within the range of related native taxa. This can lead to emerging forest disease both by facilitating introduction of exotic pathogens, and by providing susceptible hosts on which epidemics of...

Data from: Costs and benefits of sub-lethal Drosophila C virus infection

Vanika Gupta, Charlotte Stewart, Samuel S.C. Rund, Katy Monteith, Pedro F. Vale, S. S. C. Rund, P. F. Vale, V. Gupta, C. O. Stewart & K. Monteith
Viruses are major evolutionary drivers of insect immune systems. Much of our knowledge of insect immune responses derives from experimental infections using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Most experiments, however, employ lethal pathogen doses through septic injury, frequently overwhelming host physiology. While this approach has revealed several immune mechanisms, it is less informative about the fitness costs hosts may experience during infection in the wild. Using both systemic and oral infection routes we find that...

Fitness traits of experimentally selfed and outcrossed Eschscholzia californica plants

T.M. Evans, M.S. Heard, A.J. Vanbergen, S. Cavers & R Ennos
This dataset contains measures of fitness traits from Eschscholzia californica progeny which were experimentally supplemented with selfed or outcrossed pollen to determine the effects of self-fertilisation on a plant which has a low propensity to self. A glasshouse experiment was conducted using 40 plants. On each plant two flowers were emasculated and the first supplemented with outcrossed pollen and the second with self-pollen. From each supplemented plant, a seed was sowed from the outcrossed fruit...

Data from: Females manipulate behavior of caring males via prenatal maternal effects

Matthieu Paquet & Per T. Smiseth
In species with biparental care, there is sexual conflict as each parent is under selection to minimize its personal effort by shifting as much as possible of the workload over to the other parent. Most theoretical and empirical work on the resolution of this conflict has focused on strategies used by both parents, such as negotiation. However, because females produce the eggs, this might afford females with an ability to manipulate male behavior via maternal...

Data from: Multiple evolutionary origins of Trypanosoma evansi in Kenya

Christine M. Kamidi, Norah P. Saarman, Kirstin B. Dion, Paul O. Mireji, Collins Ouma, Grace Murilla, Serap Aksoy, Achim Schnaufer, Adalgisa Caccone & Kirstin Dion
Trypanosoma evansi is the parasite causing surra, a form of trypanosomiasis in camels and other livestock, and a serious economic burden in Kenya and many other parts of the world. Trypanosoma evansi transmission can be sustained mechanically by tabanid and Stomoxys biting flies, whereas the closely related African trypanosomes T. brucei brucei and T. b. rhodesiense require cyclical development in tsetse flies (genus Glossina) for transmission. In this study, we investigated the evolutionary origins of...

Data from: Canine brachycephaly is associated with a retrotransposon-mediated missplicing of SMOC2

Thomas W. Marchant, Edward J. Johnson, Lynn McTeir, Craig I. Johnson, Adam Gow, Tiziana Liuti, Dana Kuehn, Karen Svenson, Mairead L. Bermingham, Michaela Drögemüller, Marc Nussbaumer, Megan G. Davey, David J. Argyle, Roger M. Powell, Sérgio Guilherme, Johann Lang, Gert Ter Haar, Tosso Leeb, Tobias Schwarz, Richard J. Mellanby, Dylan N. Clements & Jeffrey J. Schoenebeck
In morphological terms, “form” is used to describe an object’s shape and size. In dogs, facial form is stunningly diverse. Facial retrusion, the proximodistal shortening of the snout and widening of the hard palate is common to brachycephalic dogs and is a welfare concern, as the incidence of respiratory distress and ocular trauma observed in this class of dogs is highly correlated with their skull form. Progress to identify the molecular underpinnings of facial retrusion...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    55

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    55

Affiliations

  • University of Edinburgh
    55
  • University of Oxford
    8
  • Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    7
  • University of Nottingham
    3
  • University of Toronto
    3
  • Universidade Lurio
    3
  • Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
    2
  • University of Aberdeen
    2
  • Australian National University
    2
  • Universidade Lúrio
    2