106 Works

Data from: Data sharing, management, use, and reuse: practices and perceptions of scientists worldwide

Carol Tenopir, Natalie M. Rice, Suzie Allard, Lynn Baird, Josh Borycz, Lisa Christian, Mike Frame, Bruce Grant, Robert Olendorf, Robert Sandusky & Lisa Zolly
Background: With data becoming a centerpiece of modern scientific discovery, data sharing by scientists is now a crucial element of scientific progress. This article aims to provide an in-depth examination of the practices and perceptions of data management, including data storage, data sharing, and data use and reuse by scientists around the world. Methods: The Usability and Assessment Working Group of DataONE, an NSF-funded environmental cyberinfrastructure project, distributed a survey to a multinational and multidisciplinary...

Research Data Services in Academic Libraries: A Survey of North American Academic Libraries in 2019

Carol Tenopir, Jordan Kaufman, Robert J. Sandusky & Danielle Pollock
To determine the extent to which research data services (RDS) are supported in academic libraries and how that has changed over a decade, in 2019 a research team led by Carol Tenopir at the University of Tennessee Center for Information and Communication Studies, in collaboration with ACRL-Choice, surveyed academic library directors in the United States and Canada. This survey allowed us to compare results with a similar survey conducted in 2012. The goal of both...

Assessing the effects of elephant foraging on the structure and diversity of an Afrotropical forest

Cooper Rosin, Kendall Beals, Michael Belovitch, Ruby Harrison, Megan Pendred, Megan Sullivan, Nicolas Yao & John Poulsen
African forest elephants (Loxodonta cyclotis) are ecosystem engineers that browse and damage large quantities of vegetation during their foraging and movement. Though elephant trail networks and clearings are conspicuous features of many African forests, the consequences of elephant foraging for forest structure and diversity are poorly documented. In this study in northeastern Gabon, we compare stem size, stem density, proportional damage, species diversity, and species relative abundance of seedlings and saplings in the vicinity of...

Data from: Use of a pressure-sensing walkway system for biometric assessment of gait characteristics in goats

Rebecca E. Rifkin, Remigiusz M. Grzeskowiak, Pierre-Yves Mulon, H. Steve Adair, Alexandru S. Biris, Madhu Dhar & David E. Anderson
The purpose of this study was to quantitatively assess gait characteristics and weight-bearing forces during ambulation in healthy goats using a pressure-sensing walkway as a biometric tool for stride, gait, and force analysis. Forty-six healthy adult goats ranging in age from 5 to 6 years, mixed-breeds, and with a mean body weight of 52 ± 7.1 kgs were used. Goats were trained to walk over a pressure-sensing walkway. Data for analysis was collected on 2...

Radio-tracking reveals insight into survival and dynamic habitat selection of fledgling Cerulean Warblers

Douglas Raybuck, Scott Stoleson, Jeffery Larkin & Than Boves
The Cerulean Warbler is a declining Nearctic-Neotropical migrant species of concern that breeds in hardwood forests of the eastern United States and Canada. While much knowledge has been gained about the nesting period of this canopy species, little is known about the post-fledging period. During the 2014 and 2015 breeding seasons, after locating and monitoring nests within a matrix of habitat conditions created by various forest management strategies in NW Pennsylvania, USA, we captured fledglings...

Do selfing species have greater niche breadth? Support from ecological niche modeling

Alannie-Grace Gabrielle Grant
We explore the relationship between plant mating system (selfing or outcrossing) and niche breadth to gain new insights into processes that drive species distributions. Using a comparative approach with highly selfing versus highly outcrossing sister species, we test the extent to which: (1) species pairs have evolved significant niche divergence and less niche overlap, (2) selfers have wider niche breadths than outcrossers or vice versa, and (3) niches of selfers and outcrossers are defined by...

Scholarly Seeking, Reading, and Use Behaviors dataset

Carol Tenopir, Lisa Christian & Jordan Kaufman
While journal articles are still considered the most important sources of scholarly reading, libraries may no longer have a monopoly on providing discovery and access. Many other sources of scholarly information are available to readers. This international study examines how researchers discover, read, and use scholarly literature for their work. Respondents in 2018 report an average of almost 20 article readings a month and there are still significant differences found in the reading and use...

Data from: Preservation-induced morphological change in salamanders and failed DNA extraction from a decades-old museum specimen: implications for Plethodon ainsworthi

Todd Pierson, Troy Kieran, Adam Clause & Nikole Castleberry
Natural history collections are important data repositories, but different chemical treatments of specimens can influence morphological measurements and DNA extraction, complicating taxonomic and conservation decisions dependent upon these data. One such example is the Bay Springs Salamander (Plethodon ainsworthi), the only United States amphibian categorized as Extinct by the IUCN. Recent research has proposed that P. ainsworthi is an invalid taxon, arguing that the 55-year-old type specimens’ morphological distinctiveness from syntopic P. mississippi is a...

Data from: Research data sharing: practices and attitudes of geophysicists

Carol Tenopir, Lisa Christian, Suzie Allard & Josh Borycz
Open data policies have been introduced by governments, funders, and publishers over the past decade. Previous research showed a growing recognition by scientists of the benefits of data-sharing and reuse, but actual practices lag and are not always compliant with new regulations. The goal of this study is to investigate motives, attitudes, and data practices of the community of earth and planetary geophysicists, a discipline believed to have accepting attitudes towards data sharing and reuse....

Data from: Bayesian analysis of a morphological supermatrix sheds light on controversial fossil hominin relationships

Mana Dembo, Nicholas J. Matzke, Arne Ø. Mooers & Mark Collard
The phylogenetic relationships of several hominin species remain controversial. Two methodological issues contribute to the uncertainty—use of partial, inconsistent datasets and reliance on phylogenetic methods that are ill-suited to testing competing hypotheses. Here, we report a study designed to overcome these issues. We first compiled a supermatrix of craniodental characters for all widely accepted hominin species. We then took advantage of recently developed Bayesian methods for building trees of serially sampled tips to test among...

Data from: Feeding ecology underlies the evolution of cichlid jaw mobility

Christopher M. Martinez, Matthew David McGee, Samuel Robert Borstein, Peter C Wainwright, Matthew D. McGee, Samuel R. Borstein & Peter C. Wainwright
The fish feeding apparatus is among the most diverse functional systems in vertebrates. While morphological and mechanical variation of feeding systems are well studied, we know far less about the diversity of the motions that they produce. We explored patterns of feeding movements in African cichlids from Lakes Malawi and Tanganyika, asking whether the degree of kinesis is associated with dietary habits of species. We used geometric morphometrics to measure feeding kinesis as trajectories of...

Data from: Female dietary bias towards large migratory moths in the European free-tailed bat (Tadarida teniotis)

Vanessa A. Mata, Francisco Amorim, Martin F. V. Corley, Gary F. McCracken, Hugo Rebelo & Pedro Beja
In bats, sexual segregation has been described in relation to differential use of roosting and foraging habitats. It is possible that variation may also exist between genders in the use of different prey types. However, until recently this idea was difficult to test owing to poorly resolved taxonomy of dietary studies. Here, we use high-throughput sequencing to describe gender-related variation in diet composition of the European free-tailed bat (Tadarida teniotis), while controlling for effects of...

Data from: Data sharing by scientists: practices and perceptions

Carol Tenopir, Suzie Allard, Kimberly Douglass, Arsev U. Aydinoglu, Lei Wu, Eleanor Read, Maribeth Manoff, Mike Frame & Arsev Umur Aydinoglu
Background: Scientific research in the 21st century is more data intensive and collaborative than in the past. It is important to study the data practices of researchers –data accessibility, discovery, re-use, preservation and, particularly, data sharing. Data sharing is a valuable part of the scientific method allowing for verification of results and extending research from prior results. Methodology/Principal Findings: A total of 1329 scientists participated in this survey exploring current data sharing practices and perceptions...

Data from: Spatial analysis of anthropogenic landscape disturbance and Buruli ulcer disease in Benin

Lindsay P. Campbell, Andrew O. Finley, Mark Eric Benbow, Jenni Gronseth, Pamela Small, Roch Christian Johnson, Ghislain E. Sopoh, Richard M. Merritt, Heather Williamson, Jiaguo Qi & M. Eric Benbow
Background: Land use and land cover (LULC) change is one anthropogenic disturbance linked to infectious disease emergence. Current research has focused largely on wildlife and vector-borne zoonotic diseases, neglecting to investigate landscape disturbance and environmental bacterial infections. One example is Buruli ulcer (BU) disease, a necrotizing skin disease caused by the environmental pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU). Empirical and anecdotal observations have linked BU incidence to landscape disturbance, but potential relationships have not been quantified as...

Data from: Stable eusociality via maternal manipulation when resistance is costless

Mauricio González-Forero
In many eusocial species, queens use pheromones to influence offspring to express worker phenotypes. While evidence suggests that queen pheromones are honest signals of the queen's reproductive health, here I show that queen's honest signaling can result from ancestral maternal manipulation. I develop a mathematical model to study the coevolution of maternal manipulation, offspring resistance to manipulation, and maternal resource allocation. I assume that (1) maternal manipulation causes offspring to be workers against offspring's interests;...

Data from: Climate mediates the effects of disturbance on ant assemblage structure

Heloise Gibb, Nathan J. Sanders, Robert R. Dunn, Simon Watson, Manoli Photakis, Silvia Abril, Alan N. Andersen, Elena Angulo, Inge Armbrecht, Xavier Arnan, Fabricio B. Baccaro, Tom R. Bishop, Raphael Boulay, Cristina Castracani, Israel Del Toro, Thibaut Delsinne, Mireia Diaz, David A. Donoso, Martha L. Enríquez, Tom M. Fayle, Donald H. Feener, Matthew C. Fitzpatrick, Crisanto Gómez, Donato A. Grasso, Sarah Groc … & T. C. Munyai
Many studies have focused on the impacts of climate change on biological assemblages, yet little is known about how climate interacts with other major anthropogenic influences on biodiversity, such as habitat disturbance. Using a unique global database of 1128 local ant assemblages, we examined whether climate mediates the effects of habitat disturbance on assemblage structure at a global scale. Species richness and evenness were associated positively with temperature, and negatively with disturbance. However, the interaction...

Data from: Combining GWAS and RNA-seq approaches for detection of the causal mutation for hereditary junctional epidermolysis bullosa in sheep

Aroa Suárez-Vega, Beatriz Gutiérrez-Gil, Julio Benavides, Valentín Perez, Gwenola Tosser-Klopp, Christophe Klopp, Stephen J. Keennel & Juan José Arranz
In this study, we demonstrate the use of a genome-wide association mapping together with RNA-seq in a reduced number of samples, as an efficient approach to detect the causal mutation for a Mendelian disease. Junctional epidermolysis bullosa is a recessive genodermatosis that manifests with neonatal mechanical fragility of the skin, blistering confined to the lamina lucida of the basement membrane and severe alteration of the hemidesmosomal junctions. In Spanish Churra sheep, junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB)...

Data from: Patterns of host plant utilization and diversification in the brush-footed butterflies

Christopher A. Hamm & James A. Fordyce
Herbivorous insects represent one of the most successful animal radiations known. They occupy a wide range of niches, feed on a great variety of plants, and are species rich; yet the factors that influence their diversification are poorly understood. Host breadth is often cited as a major factor influencing diversification, and, according to the Oscillation Hypothesis, shifts from generalist to specialist feeding states increase the diversification rate for a clade. We explored the relationship between...

Data from: Molecular and fossil evidence place the origin of cichlid fishes long after Gondwanan rifting

Matt Friedman, Benjamin P. Keck, Alex Dornburg, Ron I. Eytan, Christopher H. Martin, C. Darrin Hulsey, Peter C. Wainwright, Thomas J. Near, A. Dornburg, R. I. Eytan, T. J. Near, C. H. Martin, P. C. Wainwright, C. D. Hulsey, B. P. Keck & M. Friedman
Cichlid fishes are a key model system in the study of adaptive radiation, speciation and evolutionary developmental biology. More than 1600 cichlid species inhabit freshwater and marginal marine environments across several southern landmasses. This distributional pattern, combined with parallels between cichlid phylogeny and sequences of Mesozoic continental rifting, has led to the widely accepted hypothesis that cichlids are an ancient group whose major biogeographic patterns arose from Gondwanan vicariance. Although the Early Cretaceous (ca 135...

Data from: Explicit tests of paleodrainage connections of southeastern North America and the historical biogeography of Orangethroat Darters (Percidae: Etheostoma: Ceasia)

Christen M. Bossu, Jeremy M. Beaulieu, Patrick A. Ceas & Thomas J. Near
The alteration of paleodrainage river connections has shaped patterns of speciation, genetic diversity, and the geographic distribution of the species-rich freshwater fauna of North America. The integration of ancestral range reconstruction methods and divergence time estimates provides an opportunity to infer paleodrainage connectivity and test alternative paleodrainage hypotheses. Members of the Orangethroat Darter clade, Ceasia, are endemic to southeastern North America and occur north and south of the Pleistocene glacial front, a distributional pattern that...

Data from: Environmental and historical imprints on beta diversity: insights from variation in rates of species turnover along gradients

Matthew C. Fitzpatrick, Nathan J. Sanders, Signe Normand, Jens-Christian Svenning, Simon Ferrier, Aaron D. Gove, Robert R. Dunn, N. J. Sanders, S. Normand, R. R. Dunn, J.-C. Svenning, A. D. Gove & S. Ferrier
A common approach for analysing geographical variation in biodiversity involves using linear models to determine the rate at which species similarity declines with geographical or environmental distance and comparing this rate among regions, taxa or communities. Implicit in this approach are weakly justified assumptions that the rate of species turnover remains constant along gradients and that this rate can therefore serve as a means to compare ecological systems. We use generalized dissimilarity modelling, a novel...

Data from: Phylogenetic relationships and character evolution analysis of Saxifragales using a supermatrix approach

Douglas E. Soltis, Mark E. Mort, Maribeth Latvis, Evgeny V. Mavrodiev, Brian C. O'Meara, Pamela S. Soltis, J. Gordon Burleigh, Rafael Rubio De Casas, M. Latvis, E. V. Mavrodiev, P. S. Soltis, J. G. Burleigh, B. C. O'Meara, M. E. Mort & D. E. Soltis
Premise of the study: We sought novel evolutionary insights for the highly diverse Saxifragales by constructing a large phylogenetic tree encompassing 36.8% of the species-level biodiversity. Methods: We built a phylogenetic tree for 909 species of Saxifragales and used this hypothesis to examine character evolution for: annual or perennial habit, woody or herbaceous habit, ovary position, petal number, carpel number, and stamen: petal ratio. We employed likelihood approaches to investigate the effect of habit and...

Data from: A 34K SNP genotyping array for Populus trichocarpa: Design, application to the study of natural populations and transferability to other Populus species

Armando Geraldes, Steve P. DiFazio, Gancho T. Slavov, Priya Ranjan, Wellington Muchero, Jan Hannemann, Lee E. Gunter, Ann M. Wymore, Christopher J. Grassa, Nima Farzaneh, Ilga Porth, Athena D. Mckown, Oleksandr Skyba, Eryang Li, Miki Fujita, Jaroslav Klápště, Joel Martin, Wendy Schackwitz, Christa Pennacchio, Daniel Rokhsar, Michael C. Friedmann, Geoffrey O. Wasteneys, Robert D. Guy, Yousry A. El-Kassaby, Shawn D. Mansfield … & Gerald A. Tuskan
Genetic mapping of quantitative traits requires genotypic data for large numbers of markers in many individuals. For such studies, the use of large single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping arrays still offers the most cost-effective solution. Herein we report on the design and performance of a SNP genotyping array for Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood). This genotyping array was designed with SNPs pre-ascertained in 34 wild accessions covering most of the species latitudinal range. We adopted a...

Data from: Positive selection on sociobiological traits in invasive fire ants

Eyal Privman, Pnina Cohen, Amir B. Cohanim, Oksana Riba-Grognuz, DeWayne Shoemaker & Laurent Keller
The fire ant Solenopsis invicta and its close relatives are highly invasive. Enhanced social cooperation may facilitate invasiveness in these and other invasive ant species. We investigated whether invasiveness in Solenopsis fire ants was accompanied by positive selection on sociobiological traits by applying a phylogenomics approach to infer ancient selection, and a population genomics approach to infer recent and ongoing selection in both native and introduced S. invicta populations. A combination of whole-genome sequencing of...

Data from: Integrative identification of incipient lineages in Heuchera longiflora (Saxifragaceae)

Ryan F. Folk, Julian C. Ginori, Douglas E. Soltis, Aaron J. Floden, Julian C Ginori, Douglas E Soltis, Aaron J Floden & Ryan A Folk
Following on emerging understanding of the diversification process, many recent workers have considered infraspecific taxa as valuable for formally recognizing incompletely speciated entities. The distinction between a species and an infraspecific taxon represents a fundamentally subjective weighting of evidence, yet this points further to the need for an evidential basis for these decisions. We explore these concepts in Heuchera longiflora (Saxifragaceae), which is morphologically variable and has a disjunct range across several physiographic provinces in...

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Resource Types

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Affiliations

  • University of Tennessee at Knoxville
    106
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