20 Works

Data from: Little impact of over-winter parasitism on a free-ranging ungulate in the high Arctic

Anja M. Carlsson, Steve D. Albon, Stephen J. Coulson, Erik Ropstad, Audun Stien, Ken Wilson, Leif Egil Loe, Vebjørn Veiberg, R. Justin Irvine, Anja Morven Carlsson, Kenneth Wilson & Robert Justin Irvine
1.Macroparasites have a central place in wildlife ecology because they have the potential to regulate host populations through effects on reproduction and/or survival. However, there remains a paucity of studies that have demonstrated the regulatory role of these parasites in free-ranging animals. 2.Previous work on Svalbard reindeer demonstrated that the experimental removal of the parasitic gastrointestinal nematode Ostertagia gruehneri transmitted in summer, improved reindeer fecundity, and that the species was capable of mediating a density-dependent...

Atmospheric gas and vegetation survey data from Winklebury Hill, UK, in 2014

E.L. Fry, A.L. Hall, J. Savage, R.D. Bardgett, N. Ostle, R.F. Pywell, J.M. Bullock & S. Oakley
This dataset contains greenhouse gas flux data and vegetation survey data from an experiment based at Winklebury Hill, UK. The vegetation survey comprises total species percentage cover and species richness data from four 50 cm by 50 cm quadrats. The greenhouse gas flux data comprises net ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange, photosynthesis and respiration data measured with an Infra-red Gas Analyser (IRGA); methane, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide data measured using gas chromatography; and nitrate and...

Soil nutrient data from Winklebury Hill, UK, in 2014

E.L. Fry, A.L. Hall, J. Savage, R.D. Bardgett, N. Ostle, R.F. Pywell, J.M. Bullock & S. Oakley
This dataset contains nutrient data from soils and microbial biomass in soils from an experiment based at Winklebury Hill, UK. The experiment used seeds and plug plants to create different plant communities on the bare chalk on Winklebury Hill and tested the resulting carbon and nutrient cycling rates and compared these to the characteristics of different plant functional groups. The experiment ran from 2013 to 2016 and this dataset contains data from 2014 only. This...

Data from: Mass extinctions over the last 500 myr: an astronomical cause?

Anatoly D. Erlykin, David A. T. Harper, Terry Sloan & Arnold W. Wolfendale
A Fourier analysis of the magnitudes and timing of the Phanerozoic mass extinctions (MEs) demonstrates that many of the periodicities claimed in other analyses are not statistically significant. Moreover we show that the periodicities associated with oscillations of the Solar System about the galactic plane are too irregular to give narrow peaks in the Fourier periodograms. This leads us to conclude that, apart from possibly a small number of major events, astronomical causes for MEs...

Data from: Disentangling the pathways of land use impacts on the functional structure of fish assemblages in Amazon streams

Rafael P. Leitão, Jansen Zuanon, David Mouillot, Cecília G. Leal, Robert M. Hughes, Philip R. Kaufmann, Sébastien Villéger, Paulo S. Pompeu, Daniele Kasper, Felipe R. De Paula, Silvio F. B. Ferraz & Toby A. Gardner
Agricultural land use is a primary driver of environmental impacts on streams. However, the causal processes that shape these impacts operate through multiple pathways and at several spatial scales. This complexity undermines the development of more effective management approaches, and illustrates the need for more in-depth studies to assess the mechanisms that determine changes in stream biodiversity. Here we present results of the most comprehensive multi-scale assessment of the biological condition of streams in the...

Ecosystem function and vegetation data from Parsonage Down, UK, in 2013

E.L. Fry, A.L. Hall, J. Savage, R.D. Bardgett, N. Ostle, R.F. Pywell & J.M. Bullock
This dataset contains vegetation survey data and nitrate and ammonium concentrations, microbial biomass data, particle size, and nitrification and mineralisation rates within soils from an experiment based at Parsonage Down, UK. The vegetation survey comprises total species percentage cover and species richness data from four 50 cm by 50 cm quadrats. The experiment investigated the effect of different plant groups on soil carbon stores and nutrient cycling, by using a mixture of hand weeding and...

Data from: Tropical forest restoration: fast resilience of plant biomass contrasts with slow recovery of stable soil C stocks

Faming Wang, Yongzhen Ding, Emma Sayer, Qinlu Li, Bi Zou, Qifeng Mo, Yingwen Li, Xiaoliang Lu, Jianwu Tang, Weixing Zhu, Zhian Li & Emma J. Sayer
1. Due to intensifying human disturbance, over half of the world’s tropical forests are reforested or afforested secondary forests or plantations. Understanding the resilience of carbon (C) stocks in these forests, and estimating the extent to which they can provide equivalent carbon (C) sequestration and stabilization to the old growth forest they replace, is critical for the global C balance. 2. In this study, we combined estimates of biomass C stocks with a detailed assessment...

Data from: Tree functional diversity affects litter decomposition and arthropod community composition in a tropical forest

Benita C. Laird-Hopkins, Laëtitia M. Bréchet, Biancolini C. Trujillo & Emma J. Sayer
Disturbance can alter tree species and functional diversity in tropical forests, which in turn could affect carbon and nutrient cycling via the decomposition of plant litter. However, the influence of tropical tree diversity on forest floor organisms and the processes they mediate are far from clear. We investigated the influence of different litter mixtures on arthropod communities and decomposition processes in a 60-year-old lowland tropical forest in Panama, Central America. We used litter mixtures representing...

Data from: Characterising demographic contributions to observed population change in a declining migrant bird

Jennifer A. Border, Ian G. Henderson, Dominic Ash & Ian R. Hartley
Populations of Afro-Palearctic migrant birds have shown severe declines in recent decades. To identify the causes of these declines, accurate measures of both demographic rates (seasonal productivity, apparent survival, immigration) and environmental parameters will allow conservation and research actions to be targeted effectively. We used detailed observations of marked breeding birds from a ‘stronghold’ population of whinchats Saxicola rubetra in England (stable against the declining European trend) to reveal both on-site and external mechanisms that...

Data from: Culture moderates changes in linguistic self-presentation and detail provision when deceiving others

Paul J. Taylor, Samuel Larner, Stacey M. Conchie & Tarek Menacere
Change in our language when deceiving is attributable to differences in the affective and cognitive experience of lying compared to truth telling, yet these experiences are also subject to substantial individual differences. On the basis of previous evidence of cultural differences in self-construal and remembering, we predicted and found evidence for cultural differences in the extent to which truths and lies contained self (versus other) references and perceptual (versus social) details. Participants (N = 320)...

Atmospheric gas and vegetation survey data from Parsonage Down, UK, in 2014

E.L. Fry, A.L. Hall, J. Savage, R.D. Bardgett, N. Ostle, R.F. Pywell, J.M. Bullock & S. Oakley
This dataset contains greenhouse gas flux data and vegetation survey data from an experiment based at Parsonage Down, UK. The vegetation survey comprises total species percentage cover and species richness data from four 50 cm by 50 cm quadrats. The greenhouse gas flux data comprises net ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange, photosynthesis and respiration data measured with an Infra-red Gas Analyser (IRGA); methane, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide data measured using gas chromatography; and nitrate and...

Ecosystem functions and vegetation data for Winklebury Hill, Salisbury Plain, UK in 2015

E.L. Fry, A.L. Hall, J. Savage, R.D. Bardgett, N. Ostle, R.F. Pywell, J.M. Bullock & S. Oakley
This dataset contains vegetation survey data, and nitrate and ammonium concentrations, nitrification and mineralisation rates, microbial biomass and carbon and nitrogen stock data from soils taken from an experiment based at Winklebury Hill, UK. The vegetation survey comprises total species percentage cover and species richness data from four 50 cm by 50 cm quadrats. Net ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange, photosynthesis and respiration data were measured with an Infra-red Gas Analyser (IRGA); methane, carbon dioxide and...

Data from: The Automated Root Exudate System (ARES): a method to apply solutes at regular intervals to soils in the field

Luis Lopez-Sangil, Charles T. George, Eduardo Medina-Barcenas, Ali J. Birkett, Catherine Baxendale, Laetitia M. Bréchet, Eduard Estradera-Gumbau, Emma J. Sayer & Charles George
1) Root exudation is a key component of nutrient and carbon dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems. Exudation rates vary widely by plant species and environmental conditions but our understanding of how root exudates affect soil functioning is incomplete, in part because there are few viable methods to manipulate root exudates in situ. To address this, we devised the Automated Root Exudate System (ARES), which simulates increased root exudation by applying small amounts of labile solutes at...

Ecosystem function data from Winklebury Hill, UK, in 2013

E.L. Fry, A.L. Hall, J. Savage, R.D. Bardgett, N. Ostle, R.F. Pywell & J.M. Bullock
This dataset contains nitrate and ammonium concentrations, nitrification and mineralisation rates, particle size and microbial biomass data from soils taken from an experiment based at Winklebury Hill, UK. The experiment used seeds and plug plants to create different plant communities on the bare chalk on Winklebury Hill and tested the resulting carbon and nutrient cycling rates and compared these to the characteristics of different plant functional groups. The experiment ran from 2013 to 2016 and...

Data from: Ecosystem nitrogen retention is regulated by plant community trait interactions with nutrient status in an alpine meadow

Fangping Wang, Guoxi Shi, Ostle Nicholas, Buqing Yao, Mingfei Ji, Wenying Wang, Zhen Ma, Huakun Zhou & Xinquan Zhao
1.Biotic nitrogen (N) retention is an important ecosystem function in the context of ongoing land use intensification, N deposition and global warming. However, a paucity of experimental evidence limits understanding of how different plant community components influence N retention in terrestrial ecosystems. 2.In this investigation we conducted a 15N labelling experiment to test how plant community properties, including plant species richness/diversity, dominance and functional traits, influence plant N uptake and retention under different nutrient availabilities....

Data from: Nectar bacteria affect life history of a generalist aphid parasitoid by altering nectar chemistry

Marijke Lenaerts, Tim Goelen, Caro Paulussen, Beatriz Herrera-Malaver, Jan Steensels, Wim Van Den Ende, Kevin Verstrepen, Felix Wäckers, Hans Jacquemyn & Bart Lievens
1. Nectar is a crucial energy resource that strongly mediates the interactions between plants and animal pollinators or plant defenders. Previous research has shown that nectar is commonly colonized by microorganisms, most commonly bacteria and yeasts, which can have a strong impact on nectar chemistry. However, at present little is known about the effects of microorganisms on the fitness of animals feeding on nectar. 2. We used three nectar bacteria representing different metabolic groups (Asaia...

Tsetse (Glossina morsitans morsitans) count data from Eastern Province, Zambia, (2013)

N.E. Anderson, G. Mulenga, J. Mashili, M. Simuunza, N. Machila, P.M. Atkinson & S.C. Welburn
This resource contains tsetse fly count data recorded during two intensive surveys in Mambwe District, Eastern Province, Zambia in 2013. Tsetse sampling was conducted along a 60 kilometre transect from the plateau region on the eastern side of the Luangwa Valley to the floor of the valley, near Mfuwe Airport. Tsetse flies were sampled using black screen fly rounds. The first survey was conducted in May and June (cold, dry season) and the second survey...

Data from: Is environmental legislation conserving tropical stream faunas? a large-scale assessment of local, riparian and catchment-scale influences on Amazonian stream fish

Cecília G. Leal, Jos Barlow, Toby Gardner, Robert M. Hughes, Rafael P. Leitão, Ralph Mac Nally, Philip R. Kaufmann, Silvio F. B. Ferraz, Jansen Zuanon, Felipe R. De Paula, Joice Ferreira, James R. Thomson, Gareth D. Lennox, Eurizângela P. Dary, Cristhiana P. Röpke, Paulo S. Pompeu & Toby A. Gardner
1.Agricultural expansion and intensification are major threats to tropical biodiversity. In addition to the direct removal of native vegetation, agricultural expansion often elicits other human-induced disturbances, many of which are poorly addressed by existing environmental legislation and conservation programmes. This is particularly true for tropical freshwater systems, where there is considerable uncertainty about whether a legislative focus on protecting riparian vegetation is sufficient to conserve stream fauna. 2.To assess the extent to which stream fish...

Boreal forest floor greenhouse gas emissions across a wildfire-disturbed chronosequence

K.E. Mason, S. Oakley, L.E. Street, M. Arróniz-Crespo, D.L. Jones, T.H. DeLuca & N.J. Ostle
Data collected during field experiments to investigate the effect of wildfires on greenhouse gas emissions across forests of differing ages in Sweden. Data comprise greenhouse gas measurements, soil horizon depth, bulk density, loss on ignition, pH, soil phosphorus, carbon and nitrogen, plant species cover, air temperature, soil temperature, soil moisture and surface leaf moisture. Greenhouse gas measurements were taken in the field. Soil cores were collected, then processed and analysed in the laboratory. Plant species...

Data from: Regime shifts shorten food chains for mesopredators with potential sublethal effects

Tessa N. Hempson, Nicholas A.J. Graham, Aaron M. MacNeil, Nathalie Bodin, Shaun K. Wilson, Nicholas A. J. Graham & M. Aaron MacNeil
1. Predator populations are in decline globally. Exploitation, as well as habitat degradation and associated changes in prey availability are key drivers of this process of trophic downgrading. In the short term, longevity and dietary adaptability of large-bodied consumers can mask potential sub-lethal effects of a changing prey base, producing a delayed effect that may be difficult to detect. 2. In coral reef ecosystems, regime shifts from coral- to algae-dominated states caused by coral bleaching...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    20

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    20

Affiliations

  • Lancaster University
    20
  • Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    7
  • University of Manchester
    6
  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
    3
  • The Open University
    3
  • Oregon State University
    2
  • Federal University of Lavras
    2
  • Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais
    2
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
    2
  • University of Sao Paulo
    2