20 Works

GPS and Time-Depth Recorder tracking data of chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarcticus) breeding at the South Orkney Islands, from 2011 to 2016

Philip Trathan, Andrew Lowther & Fabrizio Manco
This dataset captures information from GPS and Time-Depth Recorder (TDR) tracking of 221 chinstrap penguins from 4 sites at the South Orkney Islands (Cape Geddes at Laurie Island, Powell Island, Monroe Island and Signy Island). Monitoring was carried out during incubation and brood between the months of December and February from 2011 to 2016. GPS data are available at 4 minute intervals whilst birds are at the sea surface and dive data every second. Tags...

Data from: The biogeography of introgression in the critically endangered African monkey Rungweceubs kipunji

Trina E. Roberts, Tim R. B. Davenport, Kyndall B. P. Hildebrandt, Trevor Jones, William T. Stanley, Eric J. Sargis & Link E. Olson
In the four years since its original description, the taxonomy of the kipunji (Rungwecebus kipunji), a geographically restricted and critically endangered African monkey, has been the subject of much debate, and recent research suggesting that the first voucher specimen of Rungwecebus has baboon mitochondrial DNA has intensified the controversy. We show that Rungwecebus from a second region of Tanzania has a distinct mitochondrial haplotype that is basal to a clade containing all Papio species and...

Data from: Familiarity affects social network structure and discovery of prey patch locations in foraging stickleback shoals

Nicola Atton, Bennett J. Galef, William Hoppitt, Mike M. Webster & Kevin N. Laland
Numerous factors affect the fine-scale social structure of animal groups, but it is unclear how important such factors are in determining how individuals encounter resources. Familiarity affects shoal choice and structure in many social fishes. Here, we show that familiarity between shoal members of sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) affects both fine-scale social organization and the discovery of resources. Social network analysis revealed that sticklebacks remained closer to familiar than to unfamiliar individuals within the same shoal....

Data from: Alien honeybees increase pollination risks for range-restricted plants

Olivia Norfolk, Francis Gilbert & Markus P. Eichhorn
Aim Range-restricted species are of high conservation concern, and the way in which they interact with more widespread species has implications for their persistence. Here, we determine how the specialization of mutualistic interactions varies with respect to the geographic range size of plants and pollinators and assess how they respond to the introduction of the alien honeybee. We also compare network characteristics (connectance, specialization and nestedness) between an invaded low mountain and non-invaded high mountain...

Code and data for: Familiarity breeds success: pairs that meet earlier experience increased breeding performance in a wild bird population

Antica Culina, Josh Firth & Camilla Hinde
This is a Data package that contains three separate datasets and the analysis code for a manuscript 'Familiarity breeds success: pairs that meet earlier experience increased breeding performance in a wild bird population '. The first Dataset (pairs_data_2007_10) and the second dataset (pairs_data_2011_14) contain the data used to analyse the influence of meeting time of a pair of Great tits (i.e. month in the first dataset, week in the second dataset, when a pair was...

Who knows, who cares? Untangling ecological knowledge and nature connection among Amazonian colonist farmers

Katarzyna Mikolajczak, Alexander Lees, Jos Barlow, Frazer Sinclair, Oriana Trindade De Almeida, Agnis Souza & Luke Parry
Conservationists often assume that connection with and caring about nature’s wellbeing is strongly linked to ecological knowledge. Existing evidence on the link between ecological knowledge and psychological nature connection is mixed, geographically limited to countries in the Global North, and does not scrutinize potential differences in determinants of ecological knowledge and nature connection. We investigate the relationship between psychological nature connection and ecological knowledge of local bird species and assess their associations with potential drivers,...

Data from: Social network analysis shows direct evidence for social transmission of tool use in wild chimpanzees.

Catherine Hobaiter, Timothée Poisot, Klaus Zuberbühler, William Hoppitt & Thibaud Gruber
Claims of culture in animals have been stimulated by studies on a wide range of taxa revealing group-specific behavior patterns that remain stable through generations, consistent with different behavioral innovations spreading within groups by social transmission in a manner similar to human culture. In chimpanzees, 39 behaviors have been identified as 'cultural', because alternative genetic and environmental explanations for the observed regional variation appear less plausible. This interpretation is supported by experimental data from captive...

Data from: Diversity and composition of tropical butterflies along an Afromontane agricultural gradient in the Jimma Highlands, Ethiopia

Olivia Norfolk, Abebe Asale, Tsegab Temesgen, Dereje Denu, Philip J. Platts, Rob Marchant, Delenasaw Yewhalaw. & Delenasaw Yewhalaw
Afromontane landscapes are typically characterized by a mosaic of smallholder farms and the biodiversity impacts of these practices will vary in accordance to local management and landscape context. Here, we assess how tropical butterfly diversity is maintained across an agricultural landscape in the Jimma Highlands of Ethiopia. We used transect surveys to sample understory butterfly communities within degraded natural forest, semi-managed coffee forest (SMCF), exotic timber plantations, open woodland, croplands and pasture. Surveys were conducted...

Data from: Anthropogenic noise disrupts mate searching in Gryllus bimaculatus

Adam M. Bent, Thomas C. Ings & Sophie L. Mowles
Many animals use acoustic communication as a means of sending important biological information, such as their location, to potential receivers. However, anthropogenic noise is known to affect the ability of some species to either produce or receive signals, which may influence their reproductive success. In this study, we investigate the effect of anthropogenic noise on the mate searching behaviors of the field cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. To accomplish this, phonotaxis trials were conducted with female field...

A large-scale assessment of plant dispersal mode and seed traits across human-modified Amazonian forests

Joseph Hawes, Ima Vieira, Luiz Magnago, Erika Berenguer, Joice Ferreira, Luiz Aragão, Amanda Cardoso, Alexander Lees, Gareth Lennox, Joseph Tobias, Anthony Waldron & Jos Barlow
1. Quantifying the impact of habitat disturbance on ecosystem function is critical for understanding and predicting the future of tropical forests. Many studies have examined post-disturbance changes in animal traits related to mutualistic interactions with plants, but the effect of disturbance on plant traits in diverse forests has received much less attention. 2. Focusing on two study regions in the eastern Brazilian Amazon, we used a trait-based approach to examine how seed dispersal functionality within...

Is mere exposure enough? the effects of bilingual environments on infant cognitive development

Dean D'Souza, Daniel Brady, Jennifer Haensel & Hana D'Souza
Bilinguals purportedly outperform monolinguals in nonverbal tasks of cognitive control (the ‘bilingual advantage’). The most common explanation is that managing two languages during language production constantly draws upon, and thus strengthens, domain general inhibitory mechanisms (Green, 1998). However, this theory cannot explain why a bilingual advantage has been found in preverbal infants (Kovacs & Mehler, 2009). An alternative explanation is needed. We propose that exposure to more varied, less predictable (language) environments drive infants to...

Extra-territorial forays by great tits are associated with dawn song in unexpected ways

Nina Bircher, Kees Van Oers, Camilla A. Hinde & Marc Naguib
Conspicuous male signals often play an important role in both attracting mates and deterring rivals. In territorial species with extra-pair mating, female and male forays to other territories may be an important component underlying female choice and male mating success and might be influenced by male advertisement signals. Yet, whether off-territory foraying is associated with male signals is still not well understood. Here, we tested how female and male forays are associated with short-range visual...

Anthropogenic noise disrupts mate choice behaviors in female Gryllus bimaculatus

Adam Bent, Thomas Ings & Sophie Mowles
By assessing the sexual signals produced by conspecifics, individuals can make informed decisions on the best choice of mate, which can lead to reproductive fitness benefits. However, these communication systems are often vulnerable to disruption by conflicting with stimuli present in the environment. Anthropogenic noise may act as one such disruptive stimulus, leading to inefficient mate choice decisions, and thus reductions to an animal’s fitness. In this study, the mate choice behaviors of female Gryllus...

Data from: Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene sequence variation and melanism in the gray (Sciurus carolinensis), fox (Sciurus niger) and red (Sciurus vulgaris) squirrel

Helen R. McRobie, Linda M. King, Cristina Fanutti, Peter J. Coussons, Nancy D. Montcrief & Alison P. M. Thomas
Sequence variations in the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene are associated with melanism in many different species of mammals, birds, and reptiles. The gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis), found in the British Isles, was introduced from North America in the late 19th century. Melanism in the British gray squirrel is associated with a 24-bp deletion in the MC1R. To investigate the origin of this mutation, we sequenced the MC1R of 95 individuals including 44 melanic gray...

Data from: Benefits and costs of ecological restoration: rapid assessment of changing ecosystem service values at a UK wetland

Francine M. R. Hughes, Kelvin S. H. Peh, Andrew Balmford, Rob H. Field, Anthony Lamb, Jennifer C. Birch, Richard B. Bradbury, Claire Brown, Stuart H. M. Butchart, Martin Lester, Ross Morrison, Isabel Sedgwick, Chris Soans, Alison J. Stattersfield, Peter A. Stroh, Ruth D. Swetnam, David H. L. Thomas, Matt Walpole, Stuart Warrington & Kelvin S.-H. Peh
Restoration of degraded land is recognized by the international community as an important way of enhancing both biodiversity and ecosystem services, but more information is needed about its costs and benefits. In Cambridgeshire, U.K., a long-term initiative to convert drained, intensively farmed arable land to a wetland habitat mosaic is driven by a desire both to prevent biodiversity loss from the nationally important Wicken Fen National Nature Reserve (Wicken Fen NNR) and to increase the...

Data from: Interspecific social networks promote information transmission in wild songbirds

Damien R. Farine, Lucy M. Aplin, Ben C. Sheldon & William Hoppitt
Understanding the functional links between social structure and population processes is a central aim of evolutionary ecology. Multiple types of interactions can be represented by networks drawn for the same population, such as kinship, dominance or affiliative networks, but the relative importance of alternative networks in modulating population processes may not be clear. We illustrate this problem, and a solution, by developing a framework for testing the importance of different types of association in facilitating...

Data from: Social learning in otters

Zosia Ladds, William Hoppitt & Neeltje J. Boogert
The use of information provided by others to tackle life's challenges is widespread, but should not be employed indiscriminately if it is to be adaptive. Evidence is accumulating that animals are indeed selective and adopt ‘social learning strategies’. However, studies have generally focused on fish, bird and primate species. Here we extend research on social learning strategies to a taxonomic group that has been neglected until now: otters (subfamily Lutrinae). We collected social association data...

Harmonia axyridis invasion: UK distribution data 2004-2016

H.E. Roy, P.M.J. Brown, C. Harrower, H.J. Dean, S.L. Rorke & D.B. Roy
The dataset consists of location records of the Harlequin ladybird (Harmonia axyridis) in the UK. The records span from 2004 to 2016 with three records from 2003. Records were collected from several sources with the majority coming from online recording via the Harlequin Ladybird Survey website, the UK Ladybird Survey website and the iRecord Ladybird app. Other records have come from coleopterists and from a data call for the most recent ladybird atlas (e.g. local...

Grassland Hemiptera and Coleoptera collected from Teagasc Grange, Ireland between 2002 and 2005

Alvin Helden
Various methods have been used to divide communities into core species and occasional or satellite species. Some methods are somewhat arbitrary and there is evidence that many communities are more multi-modal than bimodal. They also tend to rely on having multiple years of data. A completely novel method is presented that not only has no requirement for long-term datasets but can divide communities into multiple groups. It is based on probability a species is present,...

Pied tamarins go multimodal in response to anthropogenic noise

Tainara Sobroza, Jacob Dunn, Marcelo Gordo & Adrian Barnett
Sounds produced by human activities are often loud and may mask acoustic signals used by other species for communication. To circumvent this, animals may use various strategies, including shifting modality completely or complementing acoustic information by also using another modality of communication. Here we tested the overlooked multimodal shift hypothesis using pied tamarins (Saguinus bicolor) as models. We predicted that in noisier areas the species would exhibit more scent marking behaviour (i.e., olfactory communication), while...

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