18 Works

Data from: Irreproducible text-book 'knowledge': the effects of color bands on zebra finch fitness

Daiping Wang, Wolfgang Forstmeier, Malika Ihle, Mehdi Khadraoui, Sofia Jerónimo, Katrin Martin & Bart Kempenaers
Many fields of science currently experience a heated debate about the extent of publication bias against null-findings. Here, we show a case where putatively well-established text-book knowledge cannot be confirmed. Across four decades, zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) studies have reported effects of bands of certain colors on male or female attractiveness and further on behavior, physiology, life-history and fitness. Only 8 out of 39 publications presented exclusively null-findings. Here, we analyze the results of eight...

Data from: Early-life telomere length predicts lifespan and lifetime reproductive success in a wild bird

Justin R. Eastwood, Michelle L. Hall, Niki Teunissen, Sjouke A. Kingma, Nataly Hidalgo Aranzamendi, Marie Fan, Michael Roast, Simon Verhulst & Anne Peters
Poor conditions during early development can initiate trade-offs that favour current survival at the expense of somatic maintenance and subsequently, future reproduction. However, the mechanisms that link early and late life-history are largely unknown. Recently it has been suggested that telomeres, the nucleoprotein structures at the terminal end of chromosomes, could link early-life conditions to lifespan and fitness. In wild purple-crowned fairy-wrens, we combined measurements of nestling telomere length (TL) with detailed life-history data to...

Data from: Pre-basic molt, feather quality and modulation of the adrenocortical response to stress in two populations of Rufous-collared sparrows, Zonotrichia capensis

Valentina Echeverria, Cristián F. Estades, Esteban Botero-Delgadillo, John C. Wingfield & Paulina L. Gonzalez-Gomez
Molt is an energetically expensive process in which birds may allocate 25% or more of their body protein mass to the production of new feathers. Stressful events can interfere with feather growth via the adrenal hormone corticosterone, which is released in response to environmental stress. Corticosterone release, in turn, regulates gluconeogenesis which could directly inhibit protein synthesis and deposition during molt when feathers are growing, which potentially could reduce feather quality dramatically. Thus, many species...

Data from: Weather conditions determine attenuation and speed of sound: environmental limitations for monitoring and analysing bat echolocation

Holger R. Goerlitz
Echolocating bats are regularly studied to investigate auditory-guided behaviours and as important bioindicators. Bioacoustic monitoring methods based on echolocation calls are increasingly used for risk assessment and to ultimately inform conservation strategies for bats. As echolocation calls transmit through the air at the speed of sound, they undergo changes due to atmospheric and geometric attenuation. Both the speed of sound and atmospheric attenuation, however, are variable and determined by weather conditions, particularly temperature and relative...

Data from: Large birds travel farther in homogeneous environments

Marlee A. Tucker, Olga Alexandrou, , Keith L. Bildstein, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, Chloe Bracis, John N. Brzorad, Evan R. Buechley, David Cabot, Justin M. Calabrese, Carlos Carrapato, André Chiaradia, Lisa C. Davenport, Sarah C. Davidson, Mark Desholm, Christopher R. DeSorbo, Robert Domenech, Peter Enggist, William F. Fagan, Nina Farwig, Wolfgang Fiedler, Christen H. Fleming, Alastair Franke, John M. Fryxell, Clara García-Ripollés … & João Paulo Silva
Aim: Animal movement is an important determinant of individual survival, population dynamics, and ecosystem structure and function. Yet it is still unclear how local movements are related to resource availability and the spatial arrangement of resources. Using resident bird species and migratory bird species outside of the migratory period, we examined how the distribution of resources affect the movement patterns of both large terrestrial birds (e.g., raptors, bustards, hornbills) and waterbirds (e.g., cranes, storks, ducks,...

Data from: From ornament to armament or loss of function? Breeding plumage acquisition in a genetically monogamous bird

Marie Fan, Niki Teunissen, Michelle L. Hall, Nataly Hidalgo Aranzamendi, Sjouke A. Kingma, Michael Roast, Kaspar Delhey & Anne Peters
1. The evolution of conspicuous male traits is thought to be driven by female mate choice or male-male competition. These two mechanisms are often viewed as distinct processes, with most studies focusing on female choice. 2. However, both mechanisms of sexual selection can act simultaneously on the same trait (i.e. dual function) and/or interact in a synergistic or conflicting way. Dual function-traits are commonly assumed to originate through male-male competition before being used in female...

Data from: A trade-off between thickness and length in the zebra finch sperm mid-piece

Tania Mendonca, Timothy R. Birkhead, Ashley J. Cadby, Wolfgang Forstmeier, Nicola Hemmings & Tim R. Birkhead
The sperm mid-piece has traditionally been considered to be the engine that powers sperm. Larger mid-pieces have therefore been assumed to provide greater energetic capacity. However, in the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata, a recent study showed a surprising negative relationship between mid-piece length and sperm energy content. Using a multidimensional approach to study mid-piece structure, we tested whether this unexpected relationship can be explained by a trade-off between mid-piece length and mid-piece thickness and/or cristae...

Data from: Genomic associations with bill length and disease reveal drift and selection across island bird populations

Claire Armstrong, David S. Richardson, Helen Hipperson, Gavin J. Horsburgh, Clemens Kuepper, Lawrence Percival-Alwyn, Matt Clark, Terry Burke & Lewis G. Spurgin
Island species provide excellent models for investigating how selection and drift operate in wild populations, and for determining how these processes act to influence local adaptation and speciation. Here, we examine the role of selection and drift in shaping genomic and phenotypic variation across recently separated populations of Berthelot's pipit (Anthus berthelotii), a passerine bird endemic to three archipelagos in the Atlantic. We first characterised genetic diversity and population structuring, which supported previous inferences of...

Data from: Complete brood failure in an altricial bird is almost always associated with the sudden and permanent disappearance of a parent

Peter Santema & Bart Kempenaers
1) A central goal in evolutionary ecology is to identify factors that explain variation in reproductive success, i.e. in the number of offspring produced. In altricial birds, a substantial part of this variation is determined by the number of nestlings that die before fledging, but the proximate cause of offspring mortality at a given nest is often unknown. 2) We used a uniquely comprehensive dataset of parental nestbox visits from seven breeding seasons to investigate...

Data from: Targeted re-sequencing of coding DNA sequences for SNP discovery in non-model species

Daniel W. Förster, James K. Bull, Dorina Lenz, Marijke Autenrieth, Johanna L.A. Paijmans, Robert H.S. Kraus, Carsten Nowak, Helmut Bayerl, Ralph Kuehn, Alexander P. Saveljev, Magda Sindičić, Michael Hofreiter, Krzysztof Schmidt, Joerns Fickel, Johanna L. A. Paijmans & Robert H. S. Kraus
Targeted capture coupled with high throughput sequencing can be used to gain information about nuclear sequence variation at hundreds to thousands of loci. Divergent reference capture makes use of molecular data of one species to enrich target loci in other (related) species. This is particularly valuable for non-model organisms, for which often no a priori knowledge exists regarding these loci. Here, we have used targeted capture to obtain data for 809 nuclear coding DNA sequences...

Data from: Moving in the Anthropocene: global reductions in terrestrial mammalian movements

Marlee A. Tucker, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, William F. Fagan, John M. Fryxell, Bram Van Moorter, Susan C. Alberts, Abdullahi H. Ali, Andrew M. Allen, Nina Attias, Tal Avgar, Hattie Bartlam-Brooks, Buuveibaatar Bayarbaatar, Jerrold L. Belant, Alessandra Bertassoni, Dean Beyer, Laura Bidner, Floris M. Van Beest, Stephen Blake, Niels Blaum, Chloe Bracis, Danielle Brown, P. J. Nico De Bruyn, Francesca Cagnacci, Justin M. Calabrese, Constança Camilo-Alves … & Thomas Mueller
Animal movement is fundamental for ecosystem functioning and species survival, yet the effects of the anthropogenic footprint on animal movements have not been estimated across species. Using a unique GPS-tracking database of 803 individuals across 57 species, we found that movements of mammals in areas with a comparatively high human footprint were on average one-half to one-third the extent of their movements in areas with a low human footprint. We attribute this reduction to behavioral...

Data from: Does perceived predation risk affect patterns of extra-pair paternity? A field experiment in a passerine bird

Robin N. Abbey-Lee, Yimen Gerardo Araya-Ajoy, Alexia Mouchet, Maria Moiron, Erica F. Stuber, Bart Kempenaers & Niels J. Dingemanse
1. Non-consumptive predator effects have been shown to influence a wide range of behavioural, life history, and morphological traits. Extra-pair reproduction is widespread among socially monogamous birds and may incur predation costs. Consequently, altered rates of extra-pair reproduction are expected in circumstances characterized by increased adult perceived predation risk. 2. Additionally, extra-pair reproduction is expected to be most affected for birds with phenotypes that generally increase predation risk (such as more active individuals). 3. In...

Data from: To eat and not be eaten: diurnal mass gain and foraging strategies in wintering great tits

Maria Moiron, Kimberley J. Mathot & Niels J. Dingemanse
Adaptive theory predicts that the fundamental trade-off between starvation and predation risk shapes diurnal patterns in foraging activity and mass gain in wintering passerine birds. Foragers mitigating both types of risk should exhibit a bimodal distribution (increased foraging and mass gain early and late in the day), whereas both foraging and mass gains early (vs. late) during the day are expected when the risk of starvation (vs. predation) is greatest. Finally, relatively constant rates of...

Data from: Neural activation following offensive aggression in Japanese quail

Cornelia Voigt, Katharina Hirschenhauser & Stefan Leitner
Aggression is a fundamental part of animal social behaviour. In avian species, little is known about its neural representation. In particular, neural activity following offensive aggression has not been studied in detail. Here, we investigated the patterns of brain activation using immediate-early gene (IEG) expression in male Japanese quail that showed pronounced aggressive behaviours during a 30 min male-male interaction and compared them to those of males that did not interact with a conspecific. In...

Data from: Temporal activity patterns of predators and prey across broad geographic scales

Stephen D.J. Lang, Richard P. Mann, Damien R. Farine & Stephen D J Lang
Predators and prey are locked in an evolutionary arms race that shapes their behaviour and life history. Predators target prey vulnerabilities to maximise hunting success, while prey trade-off foraging against predation avoidance. Though studies have demonstrated how predation risk can alter how prey allocate daily foraging effort, little work has considered the implications of this temporal component of behaviour from a predator’s perspective, or assessed its influence on broad-scale predator-prey interactions. We develop a method...

Data from: A comprehensive analysis of autocorrelation and bias in home range estimation

Michael J. Noonan, Marlee A. Tucker, Christen H. Fleming, Tom S. Akre, Susan C. Alberts, Abdullahi H. Ali, Jeanne Altmann, Pamela C. Antunes, Jerrold L. Belant, Dean Beyer, Niels Blaum, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, , Rogerio De Paula Cunha, Jasja Dekker, Jonathan Drescher-Lehman, Nina Farwig, Claudia Fichtel, Christina Fischer, Adam T. Ford, Jacob R. Goheen, René Janssen, Florian Jeltsch, Matthew Kauffman, Peter M. Kappeler … & Justin M. Calabrese
Home range estimation is routine practice in ecological research. While advances in animal tracking technology have increased our capacity to collect data to support home range analysis, these same advances have also resulted in increasingly autocorrelated data. Consequently, the question of which home range estimator to use on modern, highly autocorrelated tracking data remains open. This question is particularly relevant given that most estimators assume independently sampled data. Here, we provide a comprehensive evaluation of...

Data from: Field validation of radar systems for monitoring bird migration

Cecilia Nilsson, Adriaan M. Dokter, Baptiste Schmid, Martina Scacco, Liesbeth Verlinden, Johan Bäckman, Günther Haase, Giacomo Dell'Omo, Jason W. Chapman, Hidde Leijnse & Felix Liechti
1. Advances in information technology are increasing the use of radar as a tool to investigate and monitor bird migration movements. We set up a field campaign to compare and validate outputs from different radar systems. 2. Here we compare the pattern of nocturnal bird migration movements recorded by four different radar systems at a site in southern Sweden. Within the range of the weather radar (WR) Ängelholm, we operated a “BirdScan” (BS) dedicated bird...

Data from: Functional relations between body mass and risk-taking behavior in wild great tits

Maria Moiron, Yimen G. Araya Ajoy, Kimberley J. Mathot, Alexia Mouchet, Niels J. Dingemanse & Yimen G Araya-Ajoy
Natural selection often favors particular combinations of functionally-related traits, resulting in adaptive phenotypic integration. Phenotypic integration has been proposed as a potential mechanism explaining the existence of repeatable among-individual differences in behavior (i.e., animal personality). In this study, we investigated patterns of covariation between morphology and behavior in a population of free-living great tits (Parus major) monitored for seven years. In particular, we aimed to disentangle the effect of structural size versus body condition on...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    18

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    18

Affiliations

  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    18
  • University of Alberta
    4
  • Monash University
    3
  • Technical University Munich
    3
  • University of Potsdam
    3
  • Princeton University
    2
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    2
  • Duke University
    2
  • Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier
    2
  • The Ohio State University
    2