12 Works

Data from: Mutual fitness benefits arise during coevolution in a nematode-defensive microbe model

Charlotte Rafaluk-Mohr, Ben Ashby, Dylan A. Dahan & Kayla C. King
Species interactions can shift along the parasitism-mutualism continuum. However, the consequences of these transitions for coevolutionary interactions remain unclear. We experimentally coevolved a novel species interaction between Caenorhabditis elegans hosts and a mildly parasitic bacterium, Enterococcus faecalis, with host-protective properties against virulent Staphylococcus aureus. Coinfections drove the evolutionary transition of the C.elegans-E. faecalis relationship towards a reciprocally beneficial interaction. As E. faecalis evolved to protect nematodes against S. aureus infection, hosts adapted by accommodating greater...

Data from: Probabilistic methods outperform parsimony in the phylogenetic analysis of data simulated without a probabilistic model

Mark N. Puttick, Joseph E. O'Reilly, Davide Pisani, Philip C.J. Donoghue & Philip C. J. Donoghue
In order to understand patterns and processes of the diversification of life we require an accurate understanding of taxa interrelationships. Recent studies have suggested that analyses of morphological character data using the Bayesian and Maximum likelihood Mk model provide phylogenies of higher accuracy compared to parsimony methods. These studies have proved controversial, particularly simulating morphology-data under Markov models that assume shared branch lengths for characters, as it is claimed this leads to bias favouring the...

Data from: Cell wall microstructure, pore size distribution and absolute density of hemp shiv

Yunhong Jiang, Michael Lawrence, Martin P. Ansell & Atif Hussain
This paper, for the first time, fully characterises the intrinsic physical parameters of hemp shiv including cell wall microstructure, pore size distribution and absolute density. Scanning Electron Microscopy revealed microstructural features similar to hardwoods. Confocal Microscopy revealed three major layers in the cell wall: middle lamella, primary cell wall and secondary cell wall. Computed tomography improved the visualisation of pore shape and pore connectivity in three dimensions. Mercury intrusion porosimetry showed the average accessible porosity...

Data from: Archosauromorph extinction selectivity during the Triassic-Jurassic mass extinction

Bethany J. Allen, Thomas L. Stubbs, Michael J. Benton & Mark N. Puttick
Many traits have been linked to extinction risk among modern vertebrates, including mode of life and body size. However, previous work has indicated there is little evidence that body size, or any other trait, was selective during past mass extinctions. Here, we investigate the impact of the Triassic–Jurassic mass extinction on early Archosauromorpha (basal dinosaurs, crocodylomorphs and their relatives) by focusing on body size and other life history traits. We built several new archosauromorph maximum‐likelihood...

Data from: Using the Mus musculus hybrid zone to assess covariation and genetic architecture of limb bone lengths

Neva Skrabar, Leslie M. Turner, Luisa F. Pallares, Bettina Harr & Diethard Tautz
Two subspecies of the house mouse, Mus musculus domesticus and Mus musculus musculus, meet in a narrow contact zone across Europe. Mice in the hybrid zone are highly admixed, representing the full range of mixed ancestry from the two subspecies. Given the distinct morphologies of these subspecies, these natural hybrids can be used for genome-wide association mapping at sufficiently high resolution to directly infer candidate genes. We focus here on limb bone length differences, which...

Data from: Social interactions predict genetic diversification: an experimental manipulation in shorebirds

Charles Cunningham, Jorge E. Parra, Lucy Coals, Marcela Beltrán, Sama Zefania & Tamás Székely
Mating strategy and social behaviour influence gene flow and thus affect levels of genetic differentiation and potentially speciation. Previous genetic analyses of closely related plovers Charadrius spp. found strikingly different population genetic structure in Madagascar: Kittlitz’s plovers are spatially homogenous whereas white-fronted plovers have well segregated and geographically distinct populations. Here we test the hypotheses that Kittlitz’s plovers are spatially interconnected and have extensive social interactions that facilitate gene flow, whereas white-fronted plovers are spatially...

Data from: Evolution of non-kin cooperation: social assortment by cooperative phenotype in guppies

Josefine Brask, Darren Croft, Matthew Edenbrow, Richard James, Heather Bleakley, Indar Ramnarine, Robert Heathcote, Charles Tyler, Patrick Hamilton, Torben Dabelsteen & Safi Darden
Cooperation among non-kin constitutes a conundrum for evolutionary biology. Theory suggests that non-kin cooperation can evolve if individuals differ consistently in their cooperative phenotypes and assort socially by these, such that cooperative individuals interact predominantly with one another. However, our knowledge of the role of cooperative phenotypes in the social structuring of real-world animal populations is minimal. In this study, we investigated cooperative phenotypes and their link to social structure in wild Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia...

Data from: Global pattern of nest predation is disrupted by climate change in shorebirds

Vojtěch Kubelka, Miroslav Šálek, Pavel Tomkovich, Zsolt Végvári, Robert P. Freckleton & Tamás Székely
Ongoing climate change is thought to disrupt trophic relationships, with consequences for complex interspecific interactions, yet the effects of climate change on species interactions are poorly understood, and such effects have not been documented at a global scale. Using a single database of 38,191 nests from 237 populations, we found that shorebirds have experienced a worldwide increase in nest predation over the past 70 years. Historically, there existed a latitudinal gradient in nest predation, with...

Data from: Parsimony, not Bayesian analysis, recovers more stratigraphically congruent phylogenetic trees

Robert S. Sansom, Peter G. Choate, Joseph N. Keating & Emma Randle
Reconstructing evolutionary histories requires accurate phylogenetic trees. Recent simulation studies suggest that probabilistic phylogenetic analyses of morphological data are more accurate than traditional parsimony techniques. Here we use empirical data to compare Bayesian and parsimony phylogenies in terms of their congruence with the distribution of age ranges of the component taxa. Analysis of 167 independent morphological data matrices of fossil tetrapods finds that Bayesian trees exhibit significantly lower stratigraphic congruence than the equivalent parsimony trees....

Data from: Technology networks: the autocatalytic origins of innovation

Lorenzo Napolitano, Evangelos Evangelou, Emanuele Pugliese, Paolo Zeppini & Graham Room
We analyse the autocatalytic structure of technological networks and evaluate its significance for the dynamics of innovation patenting. To this aim, we define a directed network of technological fields based on the International Patents Classification, in which a source node is connected to a receiver node via a link if patenting activity in the source field anticipates patents in the receiver field in the same region more frequently than we would expect at random. We...

Data from: Using the wax moth larva Galleria mellonella infection model to detect emerging bacterial pathogens

Rafael J. Hernandez, Elze Hesse, Andrea J. Dowling, Nicola M. Coyle, Edward J. Feil, Will H. Gaze & Michiel Vos
Climate change, changing farming practices, social and demographic changes and rising levels of antibiotic resistance are likely to lead to future increases in opportunistic bacterial infections that are more difficult to treat. Uncovering the prevalence and identity of pathogenic bacteria in the environment is key to assessing transmission risks. We describe the first use of the Wax moth larva Galleria mellonella, a well-established model for the mammalian innate immune system, to selectively enrich and characterize...

Data from: Patterns of cross-resistance and collateral sensitivity between clinical antibiotics and natural antimicrobials

Abigail L. Colclough, Jukka Corander, Samuel Sheppard, Sion Bayliss, Michiel Vos, Abigail Colclough, Samuel K. Sheppard & Sion C. Bayliss
Bacteria interact with a multitude of other organisms, many of which produce antimicrobials. Selection for resistance to these antimicrobials has the potential to result in resistance to clinical antibiotics when active compounds target the same bacterial pathways. The possibility of such cross-resistance between natural antimicrobials and antibiotics has to our knowledge received very little attention. The antimicrobial activity of extracts from seaweeds, known to be prolific producers of antimicrobials, is here tested against Staphylococcus aureus...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    12

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • University of Bath
    12
  • University of Exeter
    3
  • University of Debrecen
    2
  • University of Bristol
    2
  • University of the West Indies
    1
  • Princeton University
    1
  • Moscow State University
    1
  • Stanford University School of Medicine
    1
  • University of California, Berkeley
    1
  • University of Oslo
    1