64 Works

Adaptation to drought is coupled with slow growth, but independent from phenology in marginal silver fir (Abies alba Mill.) populations

Katalin Csillery, Nina Buchmann & Bruno Fady
Drought is one of the most important selection pressures for forest trees in the context of climate change. Yet, the different evolutionary mechanisms, and their environmental drivers, by which certain populations become more drought tolerant than others is still little understood. We studied adaptation to drought in 16 silver fir (Abies alba Mill.) populations from the French Mediterranean Alps by combining observations on seedlings from a large scale greenhouse experiment (N=8199) and on adult tress...

Land use changes threaten bird taxonomic and functional diversity across the Mediterranean basin: a spatial analysis to prioritize monitoring for conservation

Johanna Fusco, Walker Emily, Papaïx Julien, Debolini Marta, Bondeau Alberte & Barnagaud Jean-Yves
Land use changes rank among the highest threats to biodiversity, but assessment of their ecological impact is impaired by data paucity in vast regions of the world. For birds, land use changes may mean habitat loss or fragmentation, changes in resource availability and disruption of biotic interactions or dispersal pathways. As a result, avian population sizes and assemblage diversity decline in areas subjected to urbanization, agricultural intensification and land abandonment worldwide. This threat is especially...

Pathogen-mediated selection favours the maintenance of innate immunity gene polymorphism in a widespread wild ungulate

Erwan Quéméré, Pauline Hessenauer, Maxime Galan, Marie Fernandez, Joël Merlet, Yannick Chaval, Nicolas Morellet, Hélène Verheyden, Emmanuelle Gilot-Fromont & Nathalie Charbonnel
Toll-like Receptors (TLR) play a central role in recognition and host frontline defence against a wide range of pathogens. A number of recent studies have shown that TLR genes (Tlrs) often exhibit large polymorphism in natural populations. Yet, there is little knowledge on how this polymorphism is maintained and how it influences disease susceptibility in the wild. In previous work, we showed that some Tlrs exhibit similarly high levels of genetic diversity as genes of...

Agroecosystem diversification with legumes or non-legumes improves differently soil fertility according to soil type

Marie Sauvadet, Jean Trap, Gaëlle Damour, Claude Plassard, Karel Van Den Meersche, Raphaël Achard, Clémentine Allinne, Patrice Autfray, Isabelle Bertrand, Eric Blanchart, Péninna Deberdt, Séguy Enock, Jean-Daniel Essobo, Grégoire Freschet, Mickaël Hedde, Elias De Melo Virginio Filho, Bodovololona Rabary, Miora Rakotoarivelo, Richard Randriamanantsoa, Béatrice Rhino, Aude Ripoche, Elisabeth Rosalie, Stéphane Saj, Thierry Becquer, Philippe Tixier … & Jean-Michel Harmand
Plant diversification through crop rotation or agroforestry is a promising way to improve sustainability of agroecosystems. Nonetheless, criteria to select the most suitable plant communities for agroecosystems diversification facing contrasting environmental constraints need to be refined. Here, we compared the impacts of 24 different plant communities on soil fertility across six tropical agroecosystems: either on highly weathered Ferralsols, with strong P limitation, or on partially weathered soils derived from volcanic material, with major N limitation....

Quantifying heritability and estimating evolutionary potential in the wild when individuals that share genes also share environments

Laura Gervais, Nicolas Morellet, Ingrid David, Mark Hewison, Denis Reale, Michel Goulard, Yannick Chaval, Bruno Lourtet, Bruno Cargnelutti, Joel Merlet, Erwan Quéméré & Benoit Pujol
Accurate heritability estimates for fitness-related traits are required to predict an organism’s ability to respond to global change. Heritability estimates are theoretically expected to be inflated if, due to limited dispersal, individuals that share genes are also likely to share similar environments. However, if relatives occupy similar environments due, at least partly, to genetic variation for habitat selection, then accounting for environmental similarity in quantitative genetic models may result in diminished heritability estimates in wild...

Data from: Variations in bark structural properties affect both water loss and carbon economics in neotropical savanna trees in the Cerrado region of Brazil

Paulo Eduardo Menezes-Silva, Lucas Loram-Lourenço, Fernanda Santos Farnese, Bruno Matheus Mendes Dario, Ana Claudia Martins, Marina Alves Aun, Priscila Ferreira Batista, Fabiano Guimarães Silva, Hervé Cochard & Augusto Cesar Franco
Even after complete stomatal closure, plants lose water through the leaf cuticles and bark. This residual water conductance of leaves (gleaf-res) and stems (gbark) can negatively impact plant water balance and affect plant survival in seasonally dry environments. However, little is known about the costs and benefits associated with such water leaks, especially on stem level. Here, we characterized the structural and functional determinants of the variability in gbark across tropical savanna species to elucidate...

Moths and butterflies on alien shores – global biogeography of non-native Lepidoptera

Richard Mally, Rebecca M. Turner, Rachael E. Blake, Gyda Fenn-Moltu, Cleo Bertelsmeier, Eckehard G. Brockerhoff, Robert J. B. Hoare, Helen F. Nahrung, Alain Roques, Deepa S. Pureswaran, Takehiko Yamanaka & Andrew M. Liebhold
Lepidoptera is a highly diverse, predominantly herbivorous insect order, with species transported to outside their native range largely facilitated by the global trade of plants and plant-based goods. Analogous to island disharmony, we examine invasion disharmony, where species filtering during invasions increases systematic compositional differences between native and non-native species assemblages, and test whether some families are more successful at establishing in non-native regions than others. We compared numbers of non-native, unintentionally introduced Lepidoptera species...

Reciprocal transplantation of two ecotypes of two species along a metal pollution gradient

David Nemer, Richard Michalet, Hugo Randé, Valérie Sappin-Didier & Florian Delerue
This dataset consists of data collected during a field experiment that took place from the beginning of June to the end of September 2020, covering the entire growing season. This experiment was conducted in the former mining area of Sentein (department of Ariège, South West of France, 42°49'30.3 "N, 0°53'53.3 "E), located at 2000m altitude at the subalpine belt of the Pyrenees Mountains on a calcareous rock. This dataset contains “Block, Habitat, Species, Ecotype and...

Bryophyte microecosystem experiment

Adam Vanbergen, Claire Boissieres, Alan Gray & Daniel Chapman
Ecosystems face multiple, potentially interacting, anthropogenic pressures that can modify biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Using a bryophyte-microarthropod microecosystem we tested the combined effects of habitat loss, episodic heat-shocks and an introduced non-native apex predator on ecosystem function (chlorophyll fluorescence as an indicator of photosystem II function) and microarthropod communities (abundance and body size). Photosynthetic function was degraded by the sequence of heat-shock episodes, but unaffected by microecosystem patch size or top-down pressure from the introduced...

Data for: Advanced infections by cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus encourage whitefly vector colonization while discouraging non-vector aphid competitors

Kerry Mauck, Quentin Chesnais & Penglin Sun
Plant viruses can change hosts in ways that increase vector contacts, virion acquisition, and subsequent vector dispersal to susceptible hosts. Based on this, researchers have proposed that virus-induced phenotypes are the product of adaptations to “manipulate” hosts in ways that increase transmission. Theoretical models of virus spread in crops support this proposition; “manipulative” viruses spread faster and to a greater extent. However, both empirical and theoretical studies on manipulation are disproportionately focused on a few...

Data from: Land-use legacies influence tree water-use efficiency and nitrogen dynamics in recently established European forests

Rossella Guerrieri, Marta Correia, Irene Martín-Forés, Raquel Alfaro-Sánchez, Joan Pino, Arndt Hampe, Fernando Valladares & Josep Espelta
1. Forest regrowth following farmland (agriculture and pasture) abandonment has been positively associated with a number of processes including the regulation of hydrological cycling, the enhancement of soil functioning, and an increase in forest productivity and carbon (C) sequestration. Although these changes in ecosystem functioning post-farmland abandonment have been observed in multiple locations and studies, the ecophysiological basis underpinning these patterns remains unclear. Here, we examine whether increased forest expansion following pastureland abandonment is associated...

Data from: Fine-scale spatial genetic structure across the species range reflects recent colonization of high elevation habitats in silver fir (Abies alba Mill.)

Enikő I. Major, Mária Höhn, Camilla Avanzi, Bruno Fady, Katrin Heer, Lars Opgenoorth, Andrea Piotti, Flaviu Popescu, Dragos Postolache, Giovanni G. Vendramin & Katalin Csilléry
Variation in genetic diversity across species ranges has long been recognized as highly informative for assessing populations’ resilience and adaptive potential. The spatial distribution of genetic diversity within populations, referred to as fine-scale spatial genetic structure (FSGS), also carries information about recent demographic changes, yet it has rarely been connected to range scale processes. We studied eight silver fir (Abies alba Mill.) population pairs (sites), growing at high and low elevations, representative of the main...

A trait-based framework for predicting foodborne pathogen risk from wild birds

Olivia Smith, Elissa Olimpi, Nora Navarro-González, Kevin Cornell, Luke Frishkoff, Tobin Northfield, Timothy Bowles, Max Edworthy, Johnna Eilers, Zhen Fu, Karina Garcia, David Gonthier, Matthew Jones, Christina Kennedy, Christopher Latimer, Jeb Owen, Chika Sato, Joseph Taylor, Erin Wilson Rankin, William Snyder & Daniel Karp
Recent foodborne illness outbreaks have heightened pressures on growers to deter wildlife from farms, jeopardizing conservation efforts. However, it remains unclear which species, particularly birds, pose the greatest risk to food safety. Using >11,000 pathogen tests and 1,565 bird surveys covering 139 bird species from across the western U.S.A., we examined the importance of 11 traits in mediating wild bird risk to food safety. We tested whether traits associated with pathogen exposure (e.g., habitat associations,...

When expansion stalls: an extension to the concept of range pinning in ecology

Thibaut Morel-Journel, Marjorie Haond, Laurent Lamy, David Muru, Lionel Roques, Ludovic Mailleret & Elodie Vercken
Identifying the factors modulating range expansion is essential to accurately predict changes in the spatial distribution of populations. By preventing population growth after dispersal, Allee effects can lead to front stops in discrete space, called ’pinning’ if permanent. However, other mechanisms, such as positive density-dependent dispersal, have also been shown to affect the rate of range expansion and generate discrete-space front stops, albeit temporarily. In this study, we investigated the stability of the front stops...

Detecting selection using extended haplotype homozygosity (EHH)-based statistics in unphased or unpolarized data

Alexander Klassmann & Mathieu Gautier
Analysis of population genetic data often includes the search for genomic regions with signs of recent positive selection. One of the approaches involves the concept of Extended Haplotype Homozygosity (EHH) and its associated statistics. These statistics typically need phased haplotypes and, some of them, polarized variants. Here, we unify and extend previously proposed modifications to loosen these requirements. We compare the modified versions with the original ones by measuring the False Discovery Rate in simulated...

Unique and shared effects of local and catchment predictors over distribution of hyporheic organisms: does the valley rule the stream?

Samuel Mouron, David Eme, Arnaud Bellec, Mélanie Bertrand, Stefano Mammola, Fréderic Liébault, Christophe J. Douady & Florian Malard
This dataset describe the distribution of two hyporheic crustacean taxa (Bogidiellidae, Amphipoda and Anthuridae, Isopoda) in streams of New Caledonia. We sampled the two taxa at 228 sites. At each site, we quantified nine local predictors related to habitat area and stability, sediment metabolism and water origin, and eight catchment predictors related to geology, area, primary productivity, land use and specific discharge.

How to quantify factors degrading DNA in the environment and predict degradation for effective sampling design

Thomas Naef, Anne-Laure Besnard, Lisa Lehnen, Eric J. Petit, Jaap Van Schaik & Sebastien J. Puechmaille
Extra-organismal DNA (eoDNA) from material left behind by organisms (non-invasive DNA: e.g., faeces, hair) or from environmental samples (eDNA: e.g., water, soil) is a valuable source of genetic information. However, the relatively low quality and quantity of eoDNA, which can be further degraded by environmental factors, results in reduced amplification and sequencing success. This is often compensated for through cost- and time-intensive replications of genotyping/sequencing procedures. Therefore, system- and site-specific quantifications of environmental degradation are...

Plant root growth against a mechanical obstacle: The early growth response of a maize root facing an axial resistance is consistent with the Lockhart model

Evelyne Kolb, Manon Quiros, Marie-Béatrice Bogeat-Triboulot & Etienne Couturier
Plant root growth is dramatically reduced in compacted soils, affecting the growth of the whole plant. Through a model experiment coupling force and kinematics measurements, we probed the force-growth relationship of a primary root contacting a stiff resisting obstacle, that mimics the strongest soil impedance variation encountered by a growing root. The growth of maize roots just emerging from a corseting agarose gel and contacting a force sensor (acting as an obstacle) was monitored by...

Binning and Hybrid assembly of synthetic microbial communities

Victoria Meslier, Benoit Quinquis, Kévin Da Silva, Florian Plaza Oñate, Nicolas Pons, Hugo Roume, Mircea Podar & Mathieu Almeida
Shotgun metagenomic sequencing is a common approach for studying the taxonomic diversity and metabolic potential of complex microbial communities. Current methods primarily use second generation short read sequencing, yet advances in third generation long read technologies provide opportunities to overcome some of the limitations of short read sequencing. Here, we compared seven platforms, encompassing second generation sequencers (Illumina HiSeq300, MGI DNBSEQ-G400 and DNBSEQ-T7, ThermoFisher Ion GeneStudio S5 and Ion Proton P1) and third generation sequencers...

Complex biotic interactions mediated by shrubs: revisiting the stress-gradient hypothesis and consequences for tree seedling survival

Arthur Guignabert, Laurent Augusto, Maya Gonzalez, Christophe Chipeaux & Florian Delerue
1. Using nurse shrubs to improve tree seedling establishment in stressed environments is a common practice in forestry. Recent refinements of the stress-gradient hypothesis suggest that positive nurse effects occur under intermediate stress and decline in the harshest conditions. Additionally, indirect facilitation is expected in low-stressed/productive systems according to the initial stress-gradient hypothesis. However, there have been fewer investigations into the use of nurse shrubs to decrease herbivore impacts in stressed systems compared with the...

Data from: Canonical correlations reveal adaptive loci and phenotypic responses to climate in perennial ryegrass

José L. Blanco-Pastor, Philippe Barre, Thomas Keep, Thomas Ledauphin, Abraham Escobar-Gutiérrez, Anna Maria Roschanski, Evelyn Willner, Klaus Dehmer, Matthew Hegarty, Hilde Muylle, Elisabeth Veeckman, Klaas Vandepoele, Tom Ruttink, Isabel Roldán-Ruiz, Stéphanie Manel & Jean-Paul Sampoux
Germplasm from perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) natural populations is useful for breeding because of its adaptation to a wide range of climates. Climate-adaptive genes can be detected from associations between genotype, phenotype and climate but an integrated framework for the analysis of these three sources of information is lacking. We used two approaches to identify adaptive loci in perennial ryegrass and their effect on phenotypic traits. First, we combined Genome-Environment Association (GEA) and GWAS...

The shape of the predator biomass distribution affects biological pest control services in agricultural landscapes

Noémie Ostandie, Lucile Muneret, Brice Giffard, Denis Thiéry & Adrien Rusch
1. Understanding how community composition of service-providing organisms affects ecosystem functioning is a key challenge in ecology. Although it has been proposed that taxonomic diversity and functional traits mediate this relationship, how several facets of community structure affect the delivery of key ecosystem services remains to be explored. 2. In this study, we investigated how abundance, taxonomic richness as well as the shape of biomass distribution in predator communities affect biological pest control services in...

Genetic diversity and population structure in Vitis species illustrate phylogeographic patterns in eastern North America

Jean-Pierre Peros, Peter Cousins, Amandine Launay, Philippe Cubry, Andrew Walker, Emilce Prado, Elisa Peressotti, Sabine Wiedemann-Merdinoglu, Valérie Laucou, Didier Merdinoglu, Patrice This, Jean-Michel Boursiquot & Agnès Doligez
Geographical distribution and diversity of current plant species have been strongly shaped by climatic oscillations during the Quaternary. Analyzing the resulting divergence among species and differentiation within species is crucial to understand the evolution of taxa like the Vitis genus, which provides very useful genetic resources for grapevine improvement and might reveal original recolonization patterns due to growth habit and dispersal mode. Here, we studied the genetic structure in natural populations of three species from...

Adaptation and correlated fitness responses over two time scales in Drosophila suzukii populations evolving in different environments

Laure Olazcuaga, Julien Foucaud, Mathieu Gautier, Candice Deschamps, Anne Loiseau, Nicolas Leménager, Benoit Facon, Virginie Ravigné, Ruth A. Hufbauer, Arnaud Estoup & Nicolas O. Rode
The process of local adaptation involves differential changes in fitness over time across different environments. While experimental evolution studies have extensively tested for patterns of local adaptation at a single time point, there is relatively little research that examines fitness more than once during the time course of adaptation. We allowed replicate populations of the fruit pest Drosophila suzukii to evolve in one of eight different fruit media. After five generations, populations with the highest...

RAD-seq data from: Evidence of local adaptation despite strong drift in a Neotropical patchily distributed bromeliad

Bárbara Simões Santos Leal, Cleber Juliano Neves Chaves, Vanessa Araujo Graciano, Christophe Boury, Luis Alberto Pillaca Huacre, Myriam Heuertz & Clarisse Palma-Silva
Both genetic drift and divergent selection are predicted to be drivers of population differentiation across patchy habitats, but the extent to which these forces act on natural populations to shape traits is strongly affected by species' ecological features. In this study, we infer the genomic structure of Pitcairnia lanuginosa, a widespread herbaceous perennial plant with a patchy distribution. We sampled populations in the Brazilian Cerrado and the Central Andean Yungas and discovered and genotyped SNP...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    23
  • 2021
    30
  • 2020
    11

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    64

Affiliations

  • National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment
    64
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    4
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    3
  • University of California, Davis
    3
  • University of Adelaide
    2
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    2
  • Wilfrid Laurier University
    2
  • Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
    2
  • University of Rennes 1
    2
  • University of California, Berkeley
    2