56 Works

Understanding complex spatial dynamics from mechanistic models through spatio-temporal point processes

Patrizia Zamberletti, Julien Papaîx, Edith Gabriel & Thomas Opitz
Landscape heterogeneity affects population dynamics, which determine species persistence, diversity and interactions. These relationships can be accurately represented by advanced spatially-explicit models (SEMs) allowing for high levels of detail and precision. However, such approaches are characterised by high computational complexity, high amount of data and memory requirements, and spatio-temporal outputs may be difficult to analyse. A possibility to deal with this complexity is to aggregate outputs over time or space, but then interesting information may...

Thermal plasticity and evolution shape predator-prey interactions differently in clear and turbid water

Ying-Jie Wang, Nedim Tüzün, Arnaud Sentis & Robby Stoks
Warming and eutrophication negatively affect freshwater ecosystems by modifying trophic interactions and increasing water turbidity. We need to consider their joint effects on predator-prey interactions, and how these depend on the thermal evolution of both predator and prey. We quantified how 4°C warming and algae-induced turbidity (that integrates turbidity per se and increased food for zooplankton prey) affect functional response parameters and prey population parameters in a common-garden experiment. We did so for all combinations...

Adaptive population structure shifts in invasive parasitic mites, Varroa destructor

Arrigo Moro, Tjeerd Blacquière, Bjorn Dahle, Vincent Dietemann, Yves Le Conte, Locke Barbara, Peter Neumann & Alexis Beaurepaire
Comparative studies of genetic diversity and population structure can shed light on the ecological and evolutionary factors governing host–parasite interactions. Even though invasive parasites are considered of major biological importance, little is known about their adaptive potential when infesting the new hosts. Here, the genetic diversification of Varroa destructor, a novel parasite of Apis mellifera originating from Asia, was investigated using population genetics to determine how the genetic structure of the parasite changed in distinct...

Data from: Biogeographic history and habitat specialisation shape floristic and phylogenetic composition across Amazonian forests

Christopher Baraloto, Jason Vleminckx, Julien Engel, Pascal Petronelli, Nállarett Dávila, Marcos Ríos, Elvis Harry Valderrama Sandoval, Italo Mesones, Juan Ernesto Guevara Andino, Claire Fortunel, Elodie Allie, C. E. Timothy Paine, Aurélie Dourdain, Jean-Yves Goret, Oscar J. Valverde-Barrantes, Freddie Draper & Paul V. A. Fine
A major challenge remains to understand the relative contributions of history, dispersal and environmental filtering to the assembly of hyperdiverse communities across spatial scales. Here, we examine the extent to which biogeographical history and habitat specialization have generated turnover among and within lineages of Amazonian trees across broad geographic and environmental gradients. We replicated standardised tree inventories in 102 0.1-ha plots located in two distant regions - the western Amazon and the eastern Guiana shield....

Competition and facilitation among fungal plant parasites affect their life-history traits

Agathe Dutt, Rault Anthony, Didier Andrivon, Stéphane Jumel, Gwenola Le Roy, Alain Baranger, Melen Leclerc & Christophe Le May
Multi-infections may result in either competitive exclusion or coexistence on the same host of pathogen genotypes belonging to the same or different species. Epidemiological consequences of multiple infections, particularly how the development and transmission of a pathogen can be modified by the presence of another pathogen, are well documented. However, understanding how life history strategies of each pathogen modulate co-infection outcomes remains quite elusive. To analyze how co-infection drives changes in life history traits and...

Plant dispersal syndromes are unreliable as predictors of zoochory and long-distance dispersal by ungulates and waterbirds

Andy J. Green, Christophe Baltzinger & Ádám Lovas-Kiss
Plant dispersal syndromes are allocated based on diaspore morphology and used to predict mechanisms of dispersal. Many authors assume that only angiosperms with endozoochory, epizoochory or anemochory syndromes have a long-distance dispersal (LDD) mechanism. Too much faith is often placed in classical syndromes to explain historical dispersal events and to predict future ones. The “endozoochory syndrome” is actually a “frugivory syndrome” and has often diverted attention from endozoochory by non-frugivores (e.g. waterbirds and large herbivores)...

I alternate therefore I generalize: how the intrinsic resistance risk of fungicides counterbalances their durability

Agathe Ballu, Philomène Despréaux, Clémentine Duplaix, Anne Dérédec, Florence Carpentier & Anne-Sophie Walker
The evolution of resistance to pesticides is a major burden in agriculture. Resistance management involves maximizing selection pressure heterogeneity, particularly by combining active ingredients with different modes of action. We tested the hypothesis that alternation may delay the build-up of resistance not only by spreading selection pressure over longer periods, but also by decreasing the rate of evolution of resistance to alternated fungicides, by applying an experimental evolution approach to the economically important crop pathogen...

Landscape drivers of pests and pathogens abundance in arable crops

Corentin Barbu, Thomas Delaune, Malick S. Ouattara, Remy Ballot, Christophe Sausse, Irène Felix, Fabienne Maupas, Mathilde Chen, Muriel Morison & David Makowski
Farmers’ use of fungicides and insecticides constitutes a major threat to biodiversity that is also endangering agriculture itself. Landscapes could be designed to take advantage of the dependencies of pests, pathogens, and their natural enemies on elements of the landscape. Yet the complexity of the interactions makes it difficult to establish general rules. In our study, we sought to characterize the impact of the landscape on pest and pathogen prevalence, taking into account both crop...

Data from: Landscape composition and life-history traits influence bat movement and space use: analysis of 30 years of published telemetry data

Alexis Laforge, Frederic Archaux, Aurélie Coulon, Clélia Sirami, Jérémy Froidevaux, Nicolas Gouix, Sylvie Ladet, Hilaire Martin, Kévin Barré, Fabien Claireau, Christian Kerbiriou, Charlotte Roemer & Luc Barbaro
Aim: Animal movement determines home range patterns, which in turn affect individual fitness, population dynamics and ecosystem functioning. Using temperate bats, a group of particular conservation concern, we investigated how morphological traits, habitat specialization and environmental variables affect home range sizes and daily foraging movements, using a compilation of 30 years of published bat telemetry data. Location: Northern America and Europe. Time period: 1988 – 2016. Major taxa studied: Bats. Methods: We compiled data on...

Do human infrastructures shape nest distribution in the landscape depending on individual personality in a farmland bird of prey?

Juliette Rabdeau, Beatriz Arroyo, Francois Mougeot, Isabelle Badenhausser, Vincent Bretagnolle & Karine Monceau
1. Individuals´ distribution across habitats may depend on their personality. Human activities and infrastructures are critical elements of the landscape that may impact the habitat selection process. However, depending on their personality, individuals may respond differently to these unnatural elements. 2. In the present study, we first investigated whether some human infrastructures (buildings, roads and paths) shaped Montagu’s harrier nest spatial distribution in the landscape according to female personality (boldness). Second, we tested if the...

Landscape composition and life‐history traits influence bat movement and space use: Analysis of 30 years of published telemetry data

Alexis Laforge, Luc Barbaro & Frédéric Archaux
Using temperate bats, a group of particular conservation concern, we investigated how morphological traits, habitat specialization and environmental variables affect home range sizes and daily foraging movements, using a compilation of 30 years of published bat telemetry data in Northern America and Europe for the period 1988 – 2016. We compiled data on home range size and mean daily distance between roosts and foraging areas at both colony and individual levels from 166 studies of...

How to achieve a higher selection plateau in forest tree breeding? Fostering heterozygote x homozygote relationships in optimal contribution selection in the case study of Populus nigra

Mathieu Tiret, Marie Pégard & Leopoldo Sánchez
In breeding, Optimal Contribution Selection (OCS) is one of the most effective strategies to balance short- and long-term genetic responses, by maximizing genetic gain and minimizing global coancestry. Considering genetic diversity in the selection dynamic – through coancestry – is undoubtedly the reason for the success of OCS, as it avoids intial loss of favorable alleles. Originally formulated with the pedigree relationship matrix, global coancestry can nowadays be assessed with one of the possible formulations...

Weak founder effects but significant spatial genetic imprint of recent contraction and expansion of European beech populations.

Sylvie Oddou-Muratorio, Tonya Lander, Etienne Klein & Anne Roig
Understanding the ecological and evolutionary processes occurring during species range shifts is important in the current context of global change. Here, we investigate the interplay between recent expansion, gene flow and genetic drift, and their consequences for genetic diversity and structure at landscape and local scales in European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) On Mont Ventoux, South-Eastern France, we located beech forest refugia at the time of the most recent population minimum, approximately 150 years ago,...

Least‐cost path analysis for urban greenways planning: a test with moths and birds across two habitats and two cities

Manon Balbi, Solène Croci, Eric J. Petit, Alain Butet, Romain Georges, Luc Madec, Jean-Pierre Caudal & Aude Ernoult
1. One of the major planning tools to respond to urban landscape fragmentation is the development of ecological corridors, i.e. interconnected networks of urban green and blue spaces. Least-cost paths (LCP) appear to be an easy and appropriate resistance-based modeling method to respond to urban planners’ needs. However, the ecological validation of urban corridors using LCP is rarely performed and needs to be generalized to different species, habitats and cities. 2. We developed an experimental...

Ladybird beetles' life history traits

Jean Louis RGM Hemptinne, Emilie Lecompte, Arnaud Sentis, Anthony F. G. Dixon & Alexandra Magro
1. The balance between risk and benefit of exploiting resources drives life history evolution in organisms. Predators are naturally recognized as major drivers of the life history evolution of their prey. Although prey may also influence the life history evolution of their predators in the context of an evolutionary arms race, there is far more evidence of the role of predators than of prey. 2. The goal of this study was to investigate the role...

Strategies to Mitigate Enteric Methane Emissions by Ruminants

C. Arndt, A.N. Hristov, W.J. Price, S.C. McClelland, A.M. Pelaez, A.R. Bayat, L.A. Crompton, J. Dijkstra, M.A. Eugène, D. Enahoro, E. Kebreab, M. Kreuzer, M. McGee, C. Martin, C.J. Newbold, C.K. Reynolds, A. Schwarm, K.J. Shingfield, J.B. Veneman, D.R. Yáñez-Ruiz & Z. Yu
To meet the 1.5°C target, methane (CH4) from ruminants must be reduced by 11 to 30% of the 2010 level by 2030 and by 24 to 47% by 2050. A meta-analysis identified strategies to decrease product-based [PB; CH4 per unit meat or milk (CH4I)] and absolute (ABS) enteric CH4 emissions while maintaining or increasing animal productivity (AP; weight gain and milk yield). Next the potential of different adoption rates of one PB and/or ABS strategies...

Data from: Unravelling hybridization in Phytophthora using phylogenomics and genome size estimation

Kris Van Poucke, Annelies Haegeman, Thomas Goedefroit, Fran Focquet, Leen Leus, Marília Horta Jung, Corina Junker, Miguel Redondo, Claude Husson, Kaloyan Kostov, Aneta Lyubenova, Petya Christova, Anne Chandelier, Slavcho Slavov, Arthur De Cock, Peter Bonants, Sabine Werres, Jonàs Palau, Benoit Marçais, Thomas Jung, Jan Stenlid, Tom Ruttink & Kurt Heungens
The genus Phytophthora comprises many economically and ecologically important plant pathogens. Hybrid species have previously been identified in at least six of the 12 phylogenetic clades. These hybrids can potentially infect a wider host range and display enhanced vigour compared to their progenitors. Phytophthora hybrids therefore pose a serious threat to agriculture as well as to natural ecosystems. Early and correct identification of hybrids is therefore essential for adequate plant protection but this is hampered...

Fonio millet genome unlocks African orphan crop diversity for agriculture in a changing climate

Michael Abrouk, Hanin Ibrahim Ahmed, Philippe Cubry, Denisa Šimoníková, Stéphane Cauet, Yveline Pailles, Jan Bettgenhaeuser, Liubov Gapa, Nora Scarcelli, Marie Couderc, Leila Zekraoui, Nagarajan Kathiresan, Jana Čížková, Eva Hřibová, Jaroslav Doležel, Sandrine Arribat, Hélène Bergès, Jan Wieringa, Mathieu Gueye, Ndjido Kane, Christian Leclerc, Sandrine Causse, Sylvie Vancoppenolle, Claire Billot, Thomas Wicker … & Simon Krattinger
Sustainable food production in the context of climate change necessitates diversification of agriculture and a more efficient utilization of plant genetic resources. Fonio millet (Digitaria exilis) is an orphan African cereal crop with a great potential for dryland agriculture. Here, we established high-quality genomic resources to facilitate fonio improvement through molecular breeding. These include a chromosome-scale reference assembly and deep re-sequencing of 183 cultivated and wild Digitaria accessions, enabling insights into genetic diversity, population structure,...

Populations of arable weed species show intra-specific variability in germination base temperature but not in early growth rate

Jana Bürger & Nathalie Colbach
Key plant traits affecting growth performance can differ among and within species, influencing competitive plant community dynamics. We determined the intra-specific variability of germination base temperature among 13 arable weed species and the seedlings’ early post-emergence relative growth rate among 21 species in climate chamber and green house experiments. Intra-specific variability was quantified with two seed populations (originating from contrasting climate in Germany & France) for the germination base temperature of 6 species and for...

Data from: As time goes by: 20 years of changes in the aquatic macroinvertebrate metacommunity of Mediterranean river networks

Miguel Cañedo-Argüelles, Cayetano Guitiérrez-Cánovas, Raul Acosta, Daniel Castro, Núria Cid, Pau Fortuño, Antoni Munné, Cesc Múrria, Rita Rodrigues, Romain Sarremejane, Maria Soria, Pol Tarrats, Iraima Verkaik, Narcís Prat & Núria Bonada
Aim: to analyse temporal metacommunity dynamics in river networks in relation to hydrological conditions and dispersal. Location: 15 river reaches from the Llobregat, Besòs and Foix catchments in the North-Eastern Iberian Peninsula. Taxon: aquatic macroinvertebrates belonging to 99 different families. Methods: we sampled aquatic macroinvertebrate communities during spring in 20 consecutive years. We built two environmental distances (one related with water chemistry and another one with river flow regime) and two spatial distances (network distance...

Do ecological specialization and functional traits explain the abundance–frequency relationship? Arable weeds as a case study

Guillaume Fried, Laura Armengot, Jonathan Storkey, Bérenger Bourgeois, Sabrina Gaba, Cyrille Violle & François Munoz
Aim: The abundance-frequency relationship (AFR) is among the most-investigated pattern in biogeography, yet the relative contributions of niche-based processes related to ecological strategies, and of neutral processes related to spatial colonization-extinction dynamics, remains uncertain. Here, we tested the influences of ecological specialization and functional traits on local abundance and regional frequency, to determine the contribution of niche-based processes. Location: France and the UK. Taxon: Vascular plants. Methods: We used two arable weed surveys covering 1544...

European soil seed bank communities across a climate and land-cover gradient

Jan Plue, Hans Van Calster, Inger Auestad, Sofia Basto, Reneé M. Bekker, Hans Henrik Bruun, Richard Chevalier, Guillaume Decocq, Ulf Grandin, Martin Hermy, Hans Jacquemyn, Anna Jakobsson, Rein Kalamees, Rob H. Marrs, Bryndis Marteinsdóttir, Per Milberg, Robin J. Pakeman, Gareth Phoenix, Ken Thompson, Vigdis Vandvik, Markus Wagner, Sara A.O. Cousins, Ove Eriksson, Jamshid Ghorbani, Małgorzata Jankowska-Błaszczuk … & Alistair G. Auffret
This is the data set used for the publication Buffering effects of soil seed banks on plant community composition in response to land use and climate, published in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography. Aim. Climate and land use are key determinants of biodiversity, with past and ongoing changes posing serious threats to global ecosystems. Unlike most other organism groups, plant species can possess dormant life-history stages such as soil seed banks, which may help...

Data from: Looking for compensation at multiple scales in a wetland bird community

Frédéric Barraquand, Coralie Picoche, Christelle Aluome, Laure Carassou & Claude Feigné
Compensatory dynamics, during which community composition shifts despite a near-constant total community size, are usually rare: synchronous dynamics prevail in natural communities. This is a puzzle for ecologists, because of the key role of compensation in explaining the relation between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. However, most studies so far have considered compensation in either plants or planktonic organisms, so that evidence for the generality of such synchrony is limited. Here, we extend analyses of community-level...

Data from: Long-term cattle grazing shifts the ecological state of forest soils

Willem Proesmans, Chris Andrews, Alan Gray, Rob Griffiths, Aidan Keith, Uffe N. Nielsen, Dave Spurgeon, Richard Pywell, Bridget Emmett & Adam J. Vanbergen
Cattle grazing profoundly affects abiotic and biotic characteristics of ecosystems. While most research has been performed on grasslands, the effect of large managed ungulates on forest ecosystems has largely been neglected. Compared to a baseline semi-natural state, we investigated how long-term cattle grazing of birch forest patches affected the abiotic state and the ecological community (microbes and invertebrates) of the soil subsystem. Grazing strongly modified the soil abiotic environment by increasing phosphorus content, pH and...

Data from: Spontaneous forest regrowth in South-West Europe: consequences for nature’s contributions to people

Irene Martín-Forés, Sandra Magro, Andres Bravo-Oviedo, Raquel Alfaro-Sánchez, Josep M. Espelta, Theresa Frei, Elena Valdés-Correcher, Carmen Rodríguez Fernández-Blanco, Georg Winkel, Gabriel Gerzabek, Arndt Hampe & Fernando Valladares
Context European forests are expanding and becoming denser following the widespread abandonment of farmland and rural areas. Yet, little is known about the goods and services that spontaneous forest regrowth provide to people. Aims We assessed the changes in nature’s contributions to people (NCP) from spontaneous forest regrowth, i.e. forest expansion and densification, in South-West Europe. Methods We investigated 65 forest plots in four different landscapes with contrasting ecological and societal contexts. Two landscapes are...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    14
  • 2021
    31
  • 2020
    11

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    56

Affiliations

  • National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment
    56
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    4
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    3
  • Wageningen University & Research
    3
  • University of California, Davis
    3
  • University of Adelaide
    2
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    2
  • Wilfrid Laurier University
    2
  • Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
    2
  • University of Lausanne
    2