138 Works

Groundwater temperatures and levels from a field experiment in the Conwy Valley, North Wales, UK (2013-2015)

M.R. Marshall, H.C. Glanville & D.M. Cooper
Data showing groundwater temperature and levels from bore holes are presented. The data were collected from a field experiment in the Conwy catchment between December 2013 and June 2015. Data were recorded by pressure transducers installed in the bore holes. The data were collected by trained members of staff from Bangor University and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The samples were taken to estimate the hydraulic pathways and velocities through an experimental hillslope. The...

Soil carbon data in the Conwy catchment in North Wales 2014

H.C. Glanville, S. Reinsch, B.J. Cosby, B.A. Emmett, M.R. Marshall, S.M. Smart, J.B. Winterbourn & D.L. Jones
The data consist of soil carbon in kilogrammes (kg) of carbon per metre squared. Soil cores were taken to a depth of 1 metre and divided into 15 cm depth increments. Soil carbon (kg carbon per metre squared) was determined for all soil depth increments. The soil samples were taken in the Conwy catchment in North West Wales. Samples were collected in the spring of 2014 across a land use intensification gradient ranging from semi-natural...

Enteric virus concentrations and chemical properties of wastewater, water, sediment and shellfish samples collected along the Conwy River and estuary, North Wales (2016-2017)

K. Farkas, D.M. Cooper, J.E. McDonald, S.K. Malham & D.L. Jones
This dataset contains pH, turbidity, conductivity and viral concentration information in river and estuarine water, wastewater, sediment and mussel samples collected in the Conwy River and estuary. The aim of data collection was to monitor wastewater contamination in the freshwater-marine continuum. Samples were collected by trained members of staff from Bangor University at four weekly between March 2016 and August 2017. Treated and untreated wastewater samples were collected at four wastewater treatment plants along the...

Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS) the erosion rate of sediment cores from salt marsh sites at Morecambe Bay and Essex

H. Ford, A. Garbutt & M. Skov
The dataset comprises the erosion rate (percent mass loss per hour) observed in sediment cores (16 centimetre (cm) diameter, 30cm height) subjected to flume tank flow for three 'waterfall' flows (Low, medium, high). Sampling was conducted at six salt marsh sites at four spatial scales: 1 m (the minimal sampling unit) nested within a hierarchy of increasing scales of 1-10 metre (m), 10-100 m and 100-1000 m. Three of the sites were in Morecambe Bay,...

Soil biological properties from a digestate experiment on winter wheat at North Wyke and Henfaes Farm, UK (2017)

T.I. Goodall, R.I. Griffiths, A Blaud, M. Abadie, I.M. Clark, P.R. Hirsch, A.M. Carswell, T.H. Misselbrook, A.R. Sánchez-Rodríguez, D.R. Chadwick, D.L. Jones & S. Reinsch
The data consist of nitrogen gene data, soil biodiversity indices and microbial community composition for three soil depths (0-15, 15-30 and 30-60 cm) from a winter wheat field experiment located in the United Kingdom and collected between April 2017 and August 2017. The sites were Rothamsted Research at North Wyke in Devon and Bangor University at Henfaes Research Station in North Wales. At each site measurements were taken from 15 plots, organised within a randomised...

Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS) dry weight root biomass from three soil depths on salt marsh sites at Morecambe Bay and Essex

H. Ford, A. Garbutt & M. Skov
The dataset comprises of dry weight root biomass data collected from 0 cm to 10 cm, 10 cm to 20 cm and 20 cm to 30 cm soil depths from six salt marsh sites. Three of the sites were in Morecambe Bay, North West England and three of the sites were in Essex, South East England. The Morecambe Bay samples were taken during the winter and summer of 2013. The Essex samples were taken during...

Greenhouse gas emissions, nitrogen use efficiency and biomass from digestate experiments on winter wheat at North Wyke and Henfaes, UK (2017)

A.R. Sánchez-Rodríguez, A.M. Carswell, J.M. Cotton, D.R. Chadwick, D.L. Jones, T.H. Misselbrook, K.S. Saunders & S. Reinsch
The data contains nitrogen (N) offtake, N emissions (ammonia and nitrous oxide), soil parameters (pH, EC, NH4+, NO3−), biomass and grain production from a winter wheat field experiment located at Bangor University (Henfaes Research Station in North Wales) and Rothamsted Research (North Wyke (NW) in Devon). Data were collected between April 2017 and August 2017. Measurements and soil and plant samples were taken from 45 plots in a randomized complete block design. Sixteen extra mini-plots...

Soil physical, chemical and biological measurements in the Conwy Catchment (North Wales) 2013 and 2014

H.C. Glanville, S. Reinsch, S.M Smart, B.J. Cosby, M.R. Marshall, B.A. Emmett, L.L. De Sosa, C. Cerdá-Moreno, E. Mesa, I. Mart­ínez, J. Espí­, S. Chesworth, W. Havelange & D.L. Jones
The data consist of general physical, biological and chemical parameters for soil samples taken in the Conwy catchment in North West Wales. Samples were collected between 2013 and 2014 across a land use intensification gradient ranging from semi-natural peatlands, acid grasslands to improved grasslands and arable fields. Soil cores were taken to a depth of 1 metre and divided into 15 centimetre (cm) depth increments. General soil physical and chemical parameters were measured at each...

Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS) percentage cover of plant species on salt marsh sites at Morecambe Bay and Essex

H. Ford, A. Garbutt & M. Skov
The dataset comprises of percentage plant cover by species observed by eye in a 1metre (m) x 1m quadrat. Measurements were recorded at six salt marsh sites at four spatial scales: 1 metre (m) (the minimal sampling unit) nested within a hierarchy of increasing scales of 1-10 m, 10-100 m and 100-1000 m. Three of the sites were in Morecambe Bay, North West England and three of the sites were in Essex, South East England....

Aboveground plant biomass and soil respiration for seven European shrublands under drought and warming manipulations (1998-2012)

S. Reinsch, E. Koller, A. Sowerby, G. De Dato, M. Estiarte, G. Guidolotti, E. Kovács-Láng, G Kröel-Dula, E. Lellei-Kovács, K.S. Larsen, D. Liberati, R Ogaya, J. Peñuelas, J. Ransijn, D.A. Robinson, I.K. Schmidt, A.R. Smith, A. Tietema, J.S. Dukes, C. Beier & B.A. Emmett
The data consists of annual measurements of standing aboveground plant biomass, annual aboveground net primary productivity and annual soil respiration between 1998 and 2012. Data were collected from seven European shrublands that were subject to the climate manipulations drought and warming. Sites were located in the United Kingdom (UK), the Netherlands (NL), Denmark ( two sites, DK-B and DK-M), Hungary (HU), Spain (SP) and Italy (IT). All field sites consisted of untreated control plots, plots...

Genomic survey of edible cockle (Cerastoderma edule) in the Northeast Atlantic: a baseline for sustainable management of its wild resources

Paulino Martínez Portela, Manuel Vera, Francesco Maroso, Sophie Wilmes, Miguel Hermida, Andrés Blanco, Carlos Fernández, Emily Groves, Shelagh Malham, Carmen Bouza, Peter Robins & Paulino Martínez
Knowledge on how environmental factors shape the genome of marine species is crucial for sustainable management of fisheries and wild populations. The edible cockle (Cerastoderma edule) is a marine bivalve distributed along the Northeast Atlantic coast of Europe and is an important resource from both commercial and ecological perspectives. We performed a population genomics screening using 2b-RAD genotyping on 9,309 SNPs localised in the cockle's genome on a sample of 536 specimens pertaining to 14...

Data from: Predicting the impacts of climate change on Papio baboon biogeography: are widespread, generalist primates ‘safe’?

Sarah E. Hill & Isabelle C. Winder
Aims: To explore whether wide-ranging, generalist primates like baboons can be presumed ‘resilient’ in the face of climate change. We identify environmental variables influencing baboons’ current distributions and predict their future potential distributions under different climate change scenarios. Location: Africa and Arabia. Taxon: Baboons, Papio spp. Methods: We used localities for olive, yellow, Guinea, hamadryas, chacma and Kinda baboons together with high-resolution data on bioclimatic variables, altitude and vegetation to construct species distribution models (SDMs)....

Data from: The importance of being genomic: non-coding and coding sequences suggest different models of toxin multi-gene family evolution

Anita Malhotra, Simon Creer, John B. Harris & Roger S. Thorpe
Studies of multi-gene protein families, including many toxins, are crucial for understanding the role of gene duplication in generating protein diversity in general. However, many evolutionary analyses of gene families are based on coding sequences, and do not take into account many potentially confounding evolutionary factors, such as recombination and convergence due to selection. We illustrate this using snake venom gene sequences from the Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) subfamily. Novel gene sequences from 20 species of...

Data from: Exploring preferences for variable delays over fixed delays to high-value food rewards as a model of food-seeking behaviours in humans

Laura-Jean G. Stokes, Anna Davies, Paul Lattimore, Catharine Winstanley & Robert D. Rogers
Foraging and operant models suggest that animals will tolerate uncertainty or risk to obtain food quickly. In modern food environments, sustained access to quick energy-dense foods can promote weight gain. Here, we used a discrete-choice procedure to examine peoples' decisions about when next to eat high-value, palatable food rewards, probabilistically delivered immediately or following longer delays. In Experiment 1, moderately hungry young females showed consistent preferences for a variable delay option that delivered food rewards...

Data from: Combining fish and benthic communities into multiple regimes reveals complex reef dynamics

Mary K. Donovan, Alan M. Friedlander, Joey Lecky, Jean-Baptiste Jouffray, Gareth J. Williams, Lisa M. Wedding, Larry B. Crowder, Ashley L. Erickson, Nick A. J. Graham, Jamison M. Gove, Carrie V. Kappel, Kendra Karr, John N. Kittinger, Albert V. Norström, Magnus Nyström, Kirsten L. L. Oleson, Kostantinos A. Stamoulis, Crow White, Ivor D. Williams & Kimberly A. Selkoe
Coral reefs worldwide face an uncertain future with many reefs reported to transition from being dominated by corals to macroalgae. However, given the complexity and diversity of the ecosystem, research on how regimes vary spatially and temporally is needed. Reef regimes are most often characterised by their benthic components; however, complex dynamics are associated with losses and gains in both fish and benthic assemblages. To capture this complexity, we synthesised 3,345 surveys from Hawai‘i to...

Data from: Quantifying pursuit-diving seabirds' associations with fine-scale physical features in tidal stream environments

James J. Waggitt, Pierre W. Cazenave, Ricardo Torres, Benjamin J. Williamson & Beth E. Scott
The rapid increase in the number of tidal stream turbine arrays will create novel and unprecedented levels of anthropogenic activity within habitats characterized by horizontal current speeds exceeding 2 ms−1. However, the potential impacts on pursuit-diving seabirds exploiting these tidal stream environments remain largely unknown. Identifying similarities between the fine-scale physical features (100s of metres) suitable for array installations, and those associated with foraging pursuit-diving seabirds, could identify which species are most vulnerable to either...

Data from: The biogeography of the atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) gut microbiome

Martin S. Llewellyn, Philip McGinnity, Melanie Dionne, Justine Letourneau, Florian Thonier, Gary R. Carvalho, Simon Creer & Nicolas Derome
Although understood in many vertebrate systems, the natural diversity of host-associated microbiota has been little studied in teleosts. For migratory fishes, successful exploitation of multiple habitats may affect and be affected by the composition of the intestinal microbiome. We collected 96 Salmo salar from across the Atlantic encompassing both freshwater and marine phases. Dramatic differences between environmental and gut bacterial communities were observed. Furthermore, community composition was not significantly impacted by geography. Instead life-cycle stage...

Data from: Genomic islands of speciation separate cichlid ecomorphs in an East African crater lake

Milan Malinsky, Richard J. Challis, Alexandra M. Tyers, Stephan Schiffels, Yohey Terai, Benjamin P. Ngatunga, Eric A. Miska, Richard Durbin, Martin J. Genner & George F. Turner
The genomic causes and effects of divergent ecological selection during speciation are still poorly understood. Here we report the discovery and detailed characterization of early-stage adaptive divergence of two cichlid fish ecomorphs in a small (700 meters in diameter) isolated crater lake in Tanzania. The ecomorphs differ in depth preference, male breeding color, body shape, diet, and trophic morphology. With whole-genome sequences of 146 fish, we identified 98 clearly demarcated genomic “islands” of high differentiation...

Data from: A 45-second self-test for cardiorespiratory fitness: heart rate-based estimation in healthy individuals

Francesco Sartor, Matteo Bonato, Gabriele Papini, Andrea Bosio, Rahil A. Mohammed, Alberto G. Bonomi, Jonathan P. Moore, Giampiero Merati, Antonio La Torre & Hans-Peter Kubis
Cardio-respiratory fitness (CRF) is a widespread essential indicator in Sports Science as well as in Sports Medicine. This study aimed to develop and validate a prediction model for CRF based on a 45 second self-test, which can be conducted anywhere. Criterion validity, test re-test study was set up to accomplish our objectives. Data from 81 healthy volunteers (age: 29 ± 8 years, BMI: 24.0 ± 2.9), 18 of whom females, were used to validate this...

Data from: How persistent are the impacts of logging roads on Central African forest vegetation?

Fritz Kleinschroth, John R. Healey, Plinio Sist, Frédéric Mortier & Sylvie Gourlet-Fleury
1. Logging roads can trigger tropical forest degradation by reducing the integrity of the ecosystem and providing access for encroachment. Therefore, road-management is crucial in reconciling selective logging and biodiversity conservation. Most logging roads are abandoned after timber harvesting, however little is known about their long-term impacts on forest vegetation and accessibility, especially in Central Africa. 2. In 11 logging concessions in the Congo Basin we field-sampled a chronosequence of roads that, judged by satellite...

Newly discovered cichlid fish biodiversity threatened by hybridization with non-native species - Data supporting published version

Martin Genner, Tabitha Blackwell, Antonia Ford, Adam Ciezarek, Stephanie Bradbeer, Carlos Gracida-Juarez, Alan Smith, Benjamin Ngatunga, Asilatu Shechonge, Rashid Tamatamah, Graham Etherington, Wilfried Haerty, Federica Di Palma & George Turner
Invasive freshwater fish systems are known to readily hybridize with indigenous congeneric species, driving loss of unique and irreplaceable genetic resources. Here we reveal that newly discovered (2013-2016) evolutionarily significant populations of Korogwe tilapia (Oreochromis korogwe) from southern Tanzania are threatened by hybridization with the larger invasive Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). We use a combination of morphology, microsatellite allele frequencies and whole genome sequences to show that O. korogwe from southern lakes (Nambawala, Rutamba and...

Data from: Trait evolution and historical biogeography shape assemblages of annual killifish

Andrew Helmstetter, Alexander Papadopulos, Javier Igea & Tom Van Dooren
Aim: Different species assemblages of annual killifish possess replicated body size distributions yet have unique sets of species in each area of endemism. Here, we use models of trait evolution and historical biogeography to discover how size variation originated and has been restructured. Location: South America. Taxon: Austrolebias (Cyprinodontiformes). Methods: We sampled 63 individuals from 26 Austrolebias species. Using phylogenetic trees (BEAST2), data on environmental variables at sampling locations and size data we compare different...

Central processing of leg proprioception in Drosophila: Physiology and behavior data

Sweta Agrawal, John Tuthill, Evyn Dickinson, Anne Sustar, Pralaksha Gurung, David Shepherd & James Truman
Proprioception, the sense of self-movement and position, is mediated by mechanosensory neurons that detect diverse features of body kinematics. Although proprioceptive feedback is crucial for accurate motor control, little is known about how downstream circuits transform limb sensory information to guide motor output. Here, we investigate neural circuits in Drosophila that process proprioceptive information from the fly leg. We identify three cell-types from distinct developmental lineages that are positioned to receive input from proprioceptor subtypes...

Species richness in North Atlantic fish: process concealed by pattern

Henrik Gislason, Jeremy Collie, Brian R. MacKenzie, Anders Nielsen, Maria De Fatima Borges, Teresa Bottari, Corina Chavez, Andrey V. Dolgov, Jakov Dulčić, Daniel Duplisea, Heino O. Fock, Didier Gascuel, Luís Gil De Sola, Jan Geert Hiddink, Remment Ter Hofstede, Igor Isajlović, Jónas Páll Jonasson, Ole Jørgensen, Kristján Kristinsson, Gudrun Marteinsdottir, Hicham Masski, Sanja Matić-Skoko, Mark R. Payne, Melita Peharda, Jakup Reinert … & Lilja Stefansdottir
Aim Previous analyses of marine fish species richness based on presence-absence data have shown changes with latitude and average species size, but little is known about the underlying processes. To elucidate these processes we use metabolic, neutral, and descriptive statistical models to analyse how richness responds to maximum species length, fish abundance, temperature, primary production, depth, latitude, and longitude, while accounting for differences in species catchability, sampling effort, and mesh size. Data Results from 53,382...

Data from: Convergence of multiple markers and analysis methods defines the genetic distinctiveness of cryptic pitvipers

, Roger S. Thorpe, Simon Creer, Delphine Lallias, Louise Dawnay, Bryan L. Stuart, Anita Malhotra, &
Using multiple markers and multiple analytical approaches is critical for establishing species boundaries reliably, especially so in the case of cryptic species. Despite development of new and powerful analytical methods, most studies continue to adopt a few, with the choice often being subjective. One such example is routine analysis of Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) data using population genetic models despite disparity between method assumptions and data properties. The application of newly developed methods for...

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