18 Works

Data from: Conserved but flexible modularity in the zebrafish skull: implications for craniofacial evolvability

Kevin J. Parsons, Young H. Son, Amelie Crespel, Davide Thambithurai, Shaun Killen, Matthew P. Harris & R. Craig Albertson
Morphological variation is the outward manifestation of development and provides fodder for adaptive evolution. Because of this contingency, evolution is often thought to be biased by developmental processes and functional interactions among structures, which are statistically detectable through forms of covariance among traits. This can take the form of substructures of integrated traits, termed modules, which together comprise patterns of variational modularity. While modularity is essential to an understanding of evolutionary potential, biologists currently have...

Data from: A local evaluation of the individual state-space to scale up Bayesian spatial capture recapture

Cyril Milleret, Pierre Dupont, Christophe Bonenfant, Henrik Brøseth, Øystein Flagstad, Chris Sutherland & Richard Bischof
1. Spatial capture-recapture models (SCR) are used to estimate animal density and to investigate a range of problems in spatial ecology that cannot be addressed with traditional non-spatial methods. Bayesian approaches in particular offer tremendous flexibility for SCR modelling. Increasingly, SCR data are being collected over very large spatial extents making analysis computational intensive, sometimes prohibitively so. 2. To mitigate the computational burden of large-scale SCR models, we developed an improved formulation of the Bayesian...

Data from: Adaptive developmental plasticity in rhesus macaques: the serotonin transporter gene interacts with maternal care to affect juvenile social behaviour

Jesus E. Madrid, Tara M. Mandalaywala, Sean P. Coyne, Jamie Ahloy-Dallaire, Joseph P. Garner, Christina S. Barr, Dario Maestripieri & Karen J. Parker
Research has increasingly highlighted the role that developmental plasticity-the ability of a particular genotype to produce variable phenotypes in response to different early environments-plays as an adaptive mechanism. One of the most widely studied genetic contributors to developmental plasticity in humans and rhesus macaques is a serotonin transporter gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), which determines transcriptional efficiency of the serotonin transporter gene in-vitro and modifies the availability of synaptic serotonin in these species. A majority of...

Data from: Large mammal declines and the incipient loss of mammal-bird mutualisms in an African savanna ecosystem

Nathan Diplock, Kate Johnston, Antoine Mellon, Laura Mitchell, Madison Moore, Daniel Schneider, Alyssa Taylor, Jess Whitney, Kera Zegar, John Kioko & Christian Kiffner
Over the past half-century, large mammal populations have declined substantially throughout East Africa, mainly due to habitat loss and unsustainable direct exploitation. While it has been acknowledged that the loss of large mammals can have direct and cascading effects on community composition and ecosystem characteristics, limited quantitative work has been done on how declines of large herbivore populations impacts the abundance of mutualistic symbionts. Using a space-for-time observational approach, we quantified the large mammal community...

Data from: Jaguar Movement Database: a GPS-based movement dataset of an apex predator in the Neotropics

Ronaldo G. Morato, Jeffrey J. Thompson, Agustín Paviolo, J. Antonio De La Torre, Fernando Lima, , Rogério C. Paula, , Leandro Silveira, Daniel L.Z. Kantek, Emiliano E. Ramalho, Louise Maranhão, Mario Haberfeld, Denis A. Sana, Rodrigo A. Medellin, Eduardo Carrillo, Victor Montalvo, Octavio Monroy-Vilchis, Paula Cruz, Anah Tereza Jácomo, Natalia M. Torres, Giselle B. Alves, Ivonne Cassaigne, Ron Thompson, Carolina Saenz-Bolanos … & Joares A. May
The field of movement ecology has rapidly grown during the last decade, with important advancements in tracking devices and analytical tools that have provided unprecedented insights into where, when, and why species move across a landscape. Although there has been an increasing emphasis on making animal movement data publicly available, there has also been a conspicuous dearth in the availability of such data on large carnivores. Globally, large predators are of conservation concern. However, due...

Data from: Genomic signatures of population bottleneck and recovery in Northwest Atlantic pinnipeds

Kristina M. Cammen, Thomas F. Schultz, W. Don Bowen, Michael O. Hammill, Wendy B. Puryear, Jonathan Runstadler, Frederick W. Wenzel, Stephanie A. Wood & Michael Kinnison
Population increases over the past several decades provide natural settings in which to study the evolutionary processes that occur during bottleneck, growth, and spatial expansion. We used parallel natural experiments of historical decline and subsequent recovery in two sympatric pinniped species in the Northwest Atlantic, the gray seal (Halichoerus grypus atlantica) and harbor seal (Phoca vitulina vitulina), to study the impact of recent demographic change in genomic diversity. Using restriction site‐associated DNA sequencing, we assessed...

Data from: Crop pests and predators exhibit inconsistent responses to surrounding landscape composition

Daniel S. Karp, Rebecca Chaplin-Kramer, Timothy D. Meehan, Emily A. Martin, Fabrice DeClerck, Heather Grab, Claudio Gratton, Lauren Hunt, Ashley E. Larsen, Alejandra Martínez-Salinas, Megan E. O’Rourke, Adrien Rusch, Katja Poveda, Mattias Jonsson, Jay A. Rosenheim, Nancy A. Schellhorn, Teja Tscharntke, Stephen D. Wratten, Wei Zhang, Aaron L. Iverson, Lynn S. Adler, Matthias Albrecht, Audrey Alignier, Gina M. Angelella, Muhammad Zubair Anjum … & Yi Zou
The idea that noncrop habitat enhances pest control and represents a win–win opportunity to conserve biodiversity and bolster yields has emerged as an agroecological paradigm. However, while noncrop habitat in landscapes surrounding farms sometimes benefits pest predators, natural enemy responses remain heterogeneous across studies and effects on pests are inconclusive. The observed heterogeneity in species responses to noncrop habitat may be biological in origin or could result from variation in how habitat and biocontrol are...

Data from: The strength of migratory connectivity for birds en route to breeding through the Gulf of Mexico

Emily B. Cohen, Clark R. Rushing, Frank R. Moore, Michael T. Hallworth, Jeffrey A. Hostetler, Mariamar Gutierrez Ramirez & Peter P. Marra
The strength of migratory connectivity is a measure of the cohesion of populations among phases of the annual cycle, including breeding, migration, and wintering. Many Nearctic-Neotropical species have strong migratory connectivity between breeding and wintering phases of the annual cycle. It is less clear if this strength persists during migration when multiple endogenous and exogenous factors may decrease the cohesion of populations among routes or through time along the same routes. We sampled three bird...

Data from: Of puzzles and pavements: a quantitative exploration of leaf epidermal cell shape

Róza V. Vőfély, Joseph Gallagher, Grace D. Pisano, Madelaine Bartlett & Siobhan A. Braybrook
Epidermal cells of leaves are diverse: tabular pavement cells, trichomes, and stomatal complexes. Pavement cells from the monocot Zea mays (maize) and the eudicot Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) have highly undulate anticlinal walls. The molecular basis for generating these undulating margins has been extensively investigated in these species. This has led to two assumptions: first, that particular plant lineages are characterized by particular pavement cell shapes; and second, that undulatory cell shapes are common enough to...

Data from: Smashing mantis shrimp strategically impact shells

R. L. Crane, S. M. Cox, S.A. Kisare & S. N. Patek
Many predators fracture strong mollusk shells, requiring specialized weaponry and behaviors. The current shell fracture paradigm is based on jaw- and claw-based predators that slowly apply forces (high impulse, low peak force). However, predators also strike shells with transient intense impacts (low impulse, high peak force). Toward the goal of incorporating impact fracture strategies into the prevailing paradigm, we measured how mantis shrimp (Neogonodactylus bredini) impact snail shells, tested whether they strike shells in different...

Data from: Consequences of multiple flower-insect interactions for subsequent plant-insect interactions and plant reproduction

Nicole L. Soper Gorden & Lynn S. Adler
Premise of the study. Plants often interact simultaneously with multiple antagonists and mutualists that can alter plant traits at the phenotypic or genetic level, subsequent plant-insect interactions, and reproduction. Although many studies have examined the effects of single floral antagonisms on subsequent pollination and plant reproduction, we know very little about the combined, potentially non-additive effects of multiple flower-insect interactions. Methods. We simulated increased florivory, nectar robbing, and pollination on field-grown Impatiens capensis. This allowed...

Data from: Phenotypic selection on floral traits in an urban landscape

Rebecca E. Irwin, Paige S. Warren & Lynn S. Adler
Native species are increasingly living in urban landscapes associated with abiotic and biotic changes that may influence patterns of phenotypic selection. However, measures of selection in urban and non-urban environments, and exploration of the mechanisms associated with such changes, are uncommon. Plant-animal interactions have played a central role in the evolution of flowering plants and are sensitive to changes in the urban landscape, and thus provide opportunities to explore how urban environments modify selection. We...

Data from: Correcting for missing and irregular data in home-range estimation

Christen H. Fleming, Daniel Sheldon, William F. Fagan, Peter Leimgruber, Thomas Mueller, Dejid Nandintsetseg, Michael J. Noonan, Kirk A. Olson, Edy Setyawan, Abraham Sianipar & Justin M. Calabrese
Home-range estimation is an important application of animal tracking data that is frequently complicated by autocorrelation, sampling irregularity, and small effective sample sizes. We introduce a novel, optimal weighting method that accounts for temporal sampling bias in autocorrelated tracking data. This method corrects for irregular and missing data, such that oversampled times are downweighted and undersampled times are upweighted to minimize error in the home-range estimate. We also introduce computationally efficient algorithms that make this...

Data from: Spatial dynamics and mixing of bluefin tuna in the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea revealed using next generation sequencing

Gregory Neils Puncher, Alessia Cariani, Gregory E. Maes, Jeroen Van Houdt, Koen Herten, Rita Cannas, Naiara Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Aitor Albaina, M. Andone Estonba, Molly Lutcavage, Alex Hanke, Jay Rooker, James S. Franks, Joseph M. Quattro, Gualtiero Basilone, Igaratza Fraile, Urtzi Laconcha, Nicolas Goñi, Ai Kimoto, A. David Macías, Francisco Alemany, Simeon Deguara, Salem W. Zgozi, Fulvio Garibaldi, Isik K. Oray … & Fausto Tinti
The Atlantic bluefin tuna is a highly migratory species emblematic of the challenges associated with shared fisheries management. In an effort to resolve the species’ stock dynamics, a genome-wide search for spatially informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was undertaken, by way of sequencing reduced representation libraries. An allele frequency approach to SNP discovery was used, combining the data of 555 larvae and young-of-the-year (LYOY) into pools representing major geographical areas and mapping against a newly...

Data from: The enemy of my enemy is my friend: native pine marten recovery reverses the decline of the red squirrel by suppressing grey squirrel populations

Emma Sheehy, Chris Sutherland, Catherine O'Reilly & Xavier Lambin
Shared enemies may instigate or modify competitive interactions between species. The dis-equilibrium caused by non-native species introductions has revealed that the outcome of such indirect interactions can often be dramatic. However, studies of enemy mediated competition mostly consider the impact of a single enemy, despite species being embedded in complex networks of interactions. Here we demonstrate that native red and invasive grey squirrels in Britain, two terrestrial species linked by resource and disease-mediated apparent competition,...

Data from: Disease where you dine: plant species and floral traits associated with pathogen transmission in bumble bees

Lynn S. Adler, Kristen M. Michaud, Stephen P. Ellner, Scott H. McArt, Phillip C. Stevenson, Rebecca E. Irwin & Philip C. Stevenson
Hotspots of disease transmission can strongly influence pathogen spread. Bee pathogens may be transmitted via shared floral use, but the role of plant species and floral trait variation in shaping transmission dynamics is almost entirely unexplored. Given the importance of pathogens for the decline of several bee species, understanding whether and how plant species and floral traits affect transmission could give us important tools for predicting which plant species may be hotspots for disease spread....

Data from: Spatiotemporal heterogeneity in prey abundance and vulnerability shapes the foraging tactics of an omnivore

Nathaniel D. Rayl, Guillaume Bastille-Rousseau, John F. Organ, Matthew A. Mumma, Shane P. Mahoney, Colleen E. Soulliere, Keith P. Lewis, Robert D. Otto, Dennis L. Murray, Lisette P. Waits & Todd K. Fuller
1. Prey abundance and prey vulnerability vary across space and time, but we know little about how they mediate predator-prey interactions and predator foraging tactics. To evaluate the interplay between prey abundance, prey vulnerability, and predator space use, we examined patterns of black bear (Ursus americanus) predation of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) neonates in Newfoundland, Canada using data from 317 collared individuals (9 bears, 34 adult female caribou, 274 caribou calves). 2. During the caribou calving...

Data from: Higher fat stores contribute to persistence of little brown bat populations with white-nose syndrome

Tina L. Cheng, Alexander Gerson, Marianne S. Moore, Jonathon D. Reichard, Joely DeSimone, Craig K.R. Willis, Winifred F. Frick & A. Marm Kilpatrick
1. The persistence of populations declining from novel stressors depends, in part, on their ability to respond by trait change via evolution or plasticity. White-nose syndrome (WNS) has caused rapid declines in several North America bat species by disrupting hibernation behavior, leading to body fat depletion and starvation. However, some populations of Myotis lucifugus now persist with WNS by unknown mechanisms. 2. We examined whether persistence of M. lucifigus with WNS could be explained by...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    18

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    18

Affiliations

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    18
  • Stanford University
    2
  • Duke University
    2
  • University of the Basque Country
    1
  • CIUDAD
    1
  • University of Padua
    1
  • University of Cagliari
    1
  • Universidade Federal de Goiás
    1
  • Universidade do Sul de Santa Catarina
    1
  • Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México
    1