3 Works

Data from: Host-associated genomic differentiation in congeneric butterflies: now you see it, now you don’t

Alexander S. Mikheyev, Carolyn S. McBride, Ulrich G. Mueller, Camille Parmesan, Melanie R. Smee, Constanti Stefanescu, Brian Wee & Michael C. Singer
Ecotypic variation among populations may become associated with widespread genomic differentiation, but theory predicts that this should happen only under particular conditions of gene flow, selection and population size. In closely related species, we might expect the strength of host-associated genomic differentiation (HAD) to be correlated with the degree of phenotypic differentiation in host-adaptive traits. Using microsatellite and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers, and controlling for isolation by distance between populations, we sought HAD...

Data from: Intercolony movement of pre-breeding seabirds over oceanic scales: implications of cryptic age-classes for conservation and metapopulation dynamics

Anthony W. J. Bicknell, Mairi E. Knight, David T. Bilton, Maria Campbell, James B. Reid, Jason Newton & Stephen C. Votier
Aim: Demographic linkage between subpopulations plays a critical role in population processes. Metapopulation dynamics, however, remains one of the most poorly understood aspects of population biology. This is especially true for small, pelagic seabirds because their discrete subpopulations are located on offshore islands, separated by vast areas of open ocean, making monitoring logistically challenging. Seabird populations often contain large numbers of immature pre-breeders that may be important for subpopulation connectivity and demography, but are poorly...

Data from: Functional traits explain variation in plant life history strategies

Peter B. Adler, Roberto Salguero-Gómez, Aldo Compagnoni, Joanna S. Hsu, Jayanti Ray-Mukherjee, Cyril Mbeau-Ache & Miguel Franco
Ecologists seek general explanations for the dramatic variation in species abundances in space and time. An increasingly popular solution is to predict species distributions, dynamics and responses to environmental change based on easily measured anatomical and morphological traits. Trait-based approaches assume that simple functional traits influence fitness and life history evolution, but rigorous tests of this assumption are lacking because they require quantitative information about the full life-cycles of many species representing different life histories....

Registration Year

  • 2013
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Plymouth University
    3
  • Utah State University
    1
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    1
  • University of Queensland
    1
  • Sir Alister Hardy Foundation for Ocean Science
    1
  • Smithsonian Institution
    1
  • Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology
    1
  • Centre for Research on Ecology and Forestry Applications
    1
  • University of Exeter
    1
  • Rockefeller University
    1