12 Works

Data from: Brachiopod shell thickness links environment and evolution

Uwe Balthasar, Jisuo Jin, Linda Hints & Maggie Cusack
While it is well established that the shapes and sizes of shells are strongly phylogenetically controlled, little is known about the phylogenetic constraints on shell thickness. Yet, shell thickness is likely to be sensitive to environmental fluctuations and has the potential to illuminate environmental perturbations through deep time. Here we systematically quantify the thickness of the anterior brachiopod shell which protects the filtration chamber and is thus considered functionally homologous across higher taxa of brachiopods....

Phil Trans R Soc A dataset

Alison Raby

Population fragmentation drives up genetic diversity in signals of individual identity

Calvin Dytham & Michael Thom
Many species advertise their unique identity to conspecifics using dedicated individuality signals: one familiar example is human faces. But how unique in the global population do these signals need to be? While human faces are highly variable, each person interacts with many fewer individuals than are found in the total population. This raises the question of how evolutionary mechanisms drive up population-wide diversity when selection occurs at such a local level. We use an individual-based...

Data from: Synchrony is more than its top-down and climatic parts: interacting Moran effects on phytoplankton in British seas

Lawrence William Sheppard, Emma J. Defriez, Philip Christopher Reid & Daniel C. Reuman
Large-scale spatial synchrony is ubiquitous in ecology. We examined 56 years of data representing chlorophyll density in 26 areas in British seas monitored by the Continuous Plankton Recorder survey. We used wavelet methods to disaggregate synchronous fluctuations by timescale and determine that drivers of synchrony include both biotic and abiotic variables. We tested these drivers for statistical significance by comparison with spatially synchronous surrogate data. We generated timescale-specific models, accounting for 61% of long-timescale (>...

Data from: Abundance drives broad patterns of generalisation in plant-hummingbird pollination networks

Benno I. Simmons, Jeferson Vizentin-Bugoni, Pietro K. Maruyama, Peter A. Cotton, Oscar H. Marín-Gómez, Carlos Lara, Liliana Rosero-Lasprilla, María A Maglianesi, Raúl Ortiz-Pulido, Márcia A. Rocca, Licléia C. Rodrigues, Boris Tinocco, Marcelo F. Vasconcelos, Marlies Sazima, Ana M. Martín González, Jesper Sonne, Carsten Rahbek, Lynn V. Dicks, Bo Dalsgaard & William J. Sutherland
Abundant pollinators are often more generalised than rare pollinators. This could be because abundant species have more chance encounters with potential interaction partners. On the other hand, generalised species could have a competitive advantage over specialists, leading to higher abundance. Determining the direction of the abundance-generalisation relationship is therefore a ‘chicken-and-egg’ dilemma. Here we determine the direction of the relationship between abundance and generalisation in plant-hummingbird pollination networks across the Americas. We find evidence that...

Asynchronous Saturation of the Carbon Sink in African and Amazonian tropical forests

Wannes Hubau, Simon Lewis, Oliver Phillips, Kofi Kofi Affum-Baffoe, Hans Hans Beeckman, Aida Cuni-Sanchez, Corneille Ewango, Sophie Fauset, Douglas Sheil, Bonaventure Sonké, Martin Sullivan, Terry Sunderland, Sean Thomas, Katharine Abernethy, Stephen Adu-Bredu, Christian Amani, Timothy Baker, Lindsay Banin, Fidèle Baya, Serge Begne, Amy Bennett, Fabrice Benedet, Robert Bitariho & Yannick Bocko
Data and R-code from Hubau W et al. 2020. 'Asynchronous Saturation of the Carbon Sink in African and Amazonian tropical forests'. Nature 579, 80-87. 2020. DOI: 10.1038/s41586-020-2035-0. ABSTRACT: Structurally intact tropical forests sequestered ~50% of global terrestrial carbon uptake over the 1990s and early 2000s, offsetting ~15% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions1-3. Climate-driven vegetation models typically predict that this tropical forest ‘carbon sink’ will continue for decades4,5. However, recent inventories of intact Amazonian forests show declining...

Contrasting responses to climate change at Himalayan treelines revealed by population demographics of two dominant species

Kumar Mainali, Bharat Shrestha, Ravi Sharma, Arjun Adhikari, Eliezer Gurarie, Michael Singer & Camille Parmesan
Alpine treelines are expected to shift upward due to recent climate change. However, interpretation of changes in montane systems has been problematic because effects of climate change are frequently confounded with those of land use changes. The eastern Himalaya, particularly Langtang National Park, Central Nepal, has been relatively undisturbed for centuries and thus presents an opportunity for studying climate change impacts on alpine treeline uncontaminated by potential confounding factors. We studied two dominant species, Abies...

Data from: Spatiotemporal variability in the structure of seagrass meadows and associated macrofaunal assemblages in southwest England (UK): using citizen science to benchmark ecological pattern

Dan A. Smale, Graham Epstein, Mark Parry & Martin J. Attrill
Seagrass meadows underpin a variety of ecosystem services and are recognised as globally important habitats and a conservation priority. However, seagrass populations are currently impacted by a range of biotic and abiotic stressors, and many are in decline globally. As such, improved understanding of seagrass populations and their associated faunal assemblages is needed to better detect and predict changes in the structure and functioning of these key habitats. Here, we analysed a large dataset -collected...

Data from: Distracted decision-makers: ship noise and predation risk change shell choice in hermit crabs

Svenja Tidau & Mark Briffa
Human induced rapid environmental change such as noise pollution alters the ability of animals to integrate information cues. Many studies focus on how noise impacts single sensory channels but in reality animals rely on multi-modal sources of information. In this study, we investigated the effect of anthropogenic noise and the visual presence of a predator on tactile information gathering during gastropod shell assessment in the European hermit crab Pagurus bernhardus. For hermit crabs, empty gastropod...

Data from: Conformity in the collective: differences in hunger affect individual and group behaviour in fish

Alexander Wilson, Alicia Burns, Emanuele Crosato, Joseph Lizier, Mikhail Prokopenko, Tim Schaerf & Ashley J. W. Ward
Animal groups are often composed of individuals that vary according to behavioural, morphological and internal state parameters. Understanding the importance of such individual-level heterogeneity to the establishment and maintenance of coherent group responses is of fundamental interest in collective behaviour. We examined the influence of hunger on the individual and collective behaviour of groups of shoaling fish, x-ray tetras (Pristella maxillaris). Fish were assigned to one of two nutritional states, satiated or hungry, and then...

Data from: Analysis of direct and indirect genetic effects in fighting sea anemones

Sarah Lane, Alastair Wilson & Mark Briffa
Theoretical models of animal contests such as the Hawk-Dove game predict that variation in fighting behaviour will persist due to mixed evolutionarily stable strategies (ESS) under certain conditions. However, the genetic basis for this variation is poorly understood and a mixed ESS for fighting can be interpreted in more than one way. Specifically, we do not know whether variation in aggression within a population arises from among-individual differences in fixed strategy (determined by an individual’s...

Data from: Quantifying Susceptibility of Marine Invertebrate Biocomposites to Dissolution in Reduced pH

Matthew Chadwick, Elizabeth M. Harper, Anaëlle Lemasson, John I. Spicer & Lloyd S. Peck
Ocean acidification threatens many ecologically and economically important marine calcifiers. The increase in shell dissolution under the resulting reduced pH is an important and increasingly recognised threat. The biocomposites that make up calcified hardparts have a range of taxon-specific compositions and microstructures, and it is evident that these may influence susceptibilities to dissolution. Here, we show how dissolution (thickness loss) under both ambient and predicted end-century pH (≈7.6) varies between seven different bivalve mollusc and...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    12

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • Plymouth University
    12
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • University of York
    2
  • Royal Museum for Central Africa
    1
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • Ghent University
    1
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    1
  • Nobel Academy
    1
  • Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais
    1
  • Mbarara University of Science and Technology
    1