34 Works

Data from: Combining niche-shift and population genetic analyses predicts rapid phenotypic evolution during invasion

Erik E. Sotka, Aaron W. Baumgardner, Paige M. Bippus, Claude Destombe, Elizabeth A. Duermit, Hikaru Endo, Ben A. Flanagan, Mits Kamiya, Lauren E. Lees, Courtney J. Murren, Masahiro Nakaoka, Sarah J. Shainker, Allan E. Strand, Ryuta Terada, Myriam Valero, Florian Weinberger, Stacy A. Krueger-Hadfield & Christophe Destombe
Rapid evolution of non-native species can facilitate invasion success, but recent reviews indicate that such microevolution rarely yields expansion of the climatic niche in the introduced habitats. However, because some invasions originate from a geographically restricted portion of the native species range and its climatic niche, it is possible that the frequency, direction and magnitude of phenotypic evolution during invasion has been underestimated. We explored the utility of niche-shift analyses in the red seaweed Gracilaria...

Data from: Quantifying hummingbird preference for floral trait combinations: the role of selection on trait interactions in the evolution of pollination syndromes

Charles B. Fenster, Richard J. Reynolds, Christopher W. Williams, Robert Makowsky & Michele R. Dudash
Darwin recognized the flower's importance for the study of adaptation and emphasized that the flower's functionality reflects the coordinated action of multiple traits. Here we use a multi-trait manipulative approach to quantify the potential role of selection acting on floral trait combinations underlying the divergence and maintenance of three related North American species of Silene (Caryophyllaceae). We artificially generated 48 plant phenotypes corresponding to all combinations of key attractive traits differing among the three Silene...

Data from: Specificity and strain-typing capabilities of Nanorod Array-Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for Mycoplasma pneumoniae detection

Kelley C. Henderson, Alvaro J. Benitez, Amy E. Ratliff, Donna M. Crabb, Edward S. Sheppard, Jonas M. Winchell, Richard A. Dluhy, Ken B. Waites, T. Prescott Atkinson & Duncan C. Krause
Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a cell wall-less bacterial pathogen of the human respiratory tract that accounts for > 20% of all community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). At present the most effective means for detection and strain-typing is quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), which can exhibit excellent sensitivity and specificity but requires separate tests for detection and genotyping, lacks standardization between available tests and between labs, and has limited practicality for widespread, point-of-care use. We have developed and previously...

Data from: Genetic identification of source and likely vector of a widespread marine invader

Stacy A. Krueger-Hadfield, Nicole M. Kollars, Allan E. Strand, James E. Byers, Sarah J. Shainker, Ryuta Terada, Thomas W. Greig, Marieke Hammann, David C. Murray, Florian Weinberger & Erik E. Sotka
The identification of native sources and vectors of introduced species informs its ecological and evolutionary history and may guide policies that seek to prevent future introductions. Population genetics represents a powerful set of tools to identify origins and vectors, but can mislead when the native range is poorly sampled or few molecular markers are used. Here, we traced the introduction of the Asian seaweed Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Rhodophyta) into estuaries in coastal western North America, the...

Data from: Real or fake? natural and artificial social stimuli elicit divergent behavioral and neural responses in mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus

Cheng-Yu Li, Hans A. Hofmann, Melissa L. Harris & Ryan L. Earley
Understanding how the brain processes social information and generates adaptive behavioural responses is a major goal in neuroscience. We examined behaviour and neural activity patterns in socially relevant brain nuclei of hermaphroditic mangrove rivulus fish (Kryptolebias marmoratus) provided with different types of social stimuli: stationary model opponent, regular mirror, non-reversing mirror and live opponent. We found that: i) individuals faced with a regular mirror were less willing to interact with, delivered fewer attacks towards, and...

Supplemental tables from: Antifibrogenic activities of CYP11A1-derived vitamin D3-hydroxyderivatives are dependent on RORγ

Zorica Janjetovic, Arnold Postlethwaite Postlethwaite, Hong Soon Kang, Tae Kang Kim, Robert Tuckey, David Crossman, Anton Jetten & Andrzej Alominski
Previous studies showed that non-calcemic 20(OH)D3, a product of CYP11A1 action on vitamin D3, has antifibrotic activity in human dermal fibroblasts and in a bleomycin mouse model of scleroderma. In this study we tested the role of RORγ, which is expressed in skin, in the action of CYP11A1-derived secosteroids using murine fibroblasts isolated from the skin of wild type (RORg+/+), knock out (RORg-/-) and heterozygote (RORg+/-) mice. CYP11A1-derived 20(OH)D3, 20,23(OH)2D3, 1,20(OH)2D3, and 1,20,23(OH)3D3 inhibited proliferation...

Alzheimer’s disease risk gene BIN1 induces Tau-dependent network hyperexcitability — MEA Axion Biosciences Maestro Recordings, Figure 6

Yuliya Voskobiynyk, Jonathan Roth, J Nicholas Cochran, Travis Rush, Nancy Carullo, Jacob Mesina, Mohhamad Waqas, Rachael Vollmer, Jeremy Day, Lori McMahon & Erik Roberson
Genome-wide association studies identified the BIN1 locus as a leading modulator of genetic risk in Alzheimer's disease (AD). One limitation in understanding BIN1's contribution to AD is its unknown function in the brain. AD-associated BIN1 variants are generally noncoding and likely change expression. Here, we determined the effects of increasing expression of the major neuronal isoform of human BIN1 in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Higher BIN1 induced network hyperexcitability on multielectrode arrays, increased frequency of...

Data from: Racial differences in recurrent ischemic stroke risk and recurrent stroke case fatality

Karen C. Albright, Lei Huang, Justin Blackburn, George Howard, Michael Mullen, Vera Bittner, Paul Muntner & Virginia Howard
Objective: To determine black-white differences in 1-year recurrent stroke and 30-day case fatality following a recurrent stroke in older US adults. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study using a 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries with fee-for-service health insurance coverage who were hospitalized for ischemic stroke between 1999 and 2013. Hazard ratios (HR) for recurrent ischemic stroke and risk ratios (RR) for 30-day case fatality comparing blacks to whites were calculated with adjustment for...

Founder effects shape linkage disequilibrium and genomic diversity of a partially clonal invader

Ben Flanagan, Stacy Krueger-Hadfield, Courtney Murren, Chris Nice, Allan Strand & Erik Sotka
Genomic variation of an invasive species may be affected by complex demographic histories and evolutionary changes during invasions. Here, we describe the relative influence of bottlenecks, clonality, and population expansion in determining genomic variability of the widespread red macroalga Agarophyton vermiculophyllum. Its introduction from mainland Japan to the estuaries of North America and Europe coincided with shifts from predominantly sexual to partially clonal reproduction and rapid adaptive evolution. A survey of 62,285 SNPs for 351...

Microsatellite genotypes and associated data for: The contribution of clonality to population genetic structure in the sea anemone Diadumene lineata

Will Ryan, Jaclyn Aida & Stacy Krueger-Hadfield
Ecological and evolutionary processes differ depending on how genetic diversity is organized in space. For clonal organisms, the organization of both genetic and genotypic diversity can influence the fitness effects of competition, the mating system, and reproductive mode, which are key drivers of life cycle evolution. Understanding how individual reproductive behavior contributes to population genetic structure is essential for disentangling these forces, particularly in species with complex and plastic life cycles. The widespread sea anemone...

Data from: The prevalence of MS in the United States: a population-based estimate using health claims data

Mitchell T. Wallin, William J. Culpepper, Jonathan D. Campbell, Lorene M. Nelson, Annette Langer-Gould, Ruth Ann Marrie, Gary R. Cutter, Wendy E. Kaye, Laurie Wagner, Helen Tremlett, Stephen L. Buka, Piyameth Dilokthornsakul, Barbara Topol, Lie H. Chen & Nicholas G. LaRocca
Objective: To generate a national multiple sclerosis (MS) prevalence estimate for the United States by applying a validated algorithm to multiple administrative health claims (AHC) datasets. Methods: A validated algorithm was applied to private, military, and public AHC datasets to identify adult cases of MS between 2008 and 2010. In each dataset, we determined the 3-year cumulative prevalence overall and stratified by age, sex, and census region. We applied insurance-specific and stratum-specific estimates to the...

Data from: The effect of Speed of Processing training on microsaccade magnitude

Stephen J. Layfield, Wesley K. Burge, William G. Mitchell, Lesley A. Ross, Christine R. Denning, Frank R. Amthor, Kristina M. Visscher, Stephen Layfield, Wesley Burge, Frank Amthor, William Mitchell, Lesley Ross, Christine Denning & Kristina Visscher
Older adults experience cognitive deficits that can lead to driving errors and a loss of mobility. Fortunately, some of these deficits can be ameliorated with targeted interventions which improve the speed and accuracy of simultaneous attention to a central and a peripheral stimulus called Speed of Processing training. To date, the mechanisms behind this effective training are unknown. We hypothesized that one potential mechanism underlying this training is a change in distribution of eye movements...

Data from: Defense traits of larval Drosophila melanogaster exhibit genetically based tradeoffs against different species of parasitoids

Jeff Leips, Theresa K. Hodges, Kate L. Laskoski, Giuseppe L. Squadrito & Maria De Luca
Populations of Drosophila melanogaster face significant mortality risks from parasitoid wasps that use species-specific strategies to locate and survive in hosts. We tested the hypothesis that parasitoids with different strategies select for alternative host defense characteristics and in doing so contribute to the maintenance of fitness variation and produce trade-offs among traits. We characterized defense traits of Drosophila when exposed to parasitoids with different host searching behaviors (Aphaereta sp. and Leptopilina boulardi). We used host...

Data from: Swimming against the tide: resilience of a riverine turtle to recurrent extreme environmental events

Abigail M. Jergenson, David A. W. Miller, Lorin A. Neuman-Lee, Daniel A. Warner & Fredric J. Janzen
Extreme environmental events (EEE) are likely to exert deleterious effects on populations. From 1996-2012 we studied the nesting dynamics of a riverine population of painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) that experienced seven years with significantly definable spring floods. We used capture-mark-recapture methods to estimate the relationships between >5-m and >6-m flood events and population parameters. Contrary to expectations, flooding was not associated with annual differences in survival, recruitment, or annual population growth rates of the adult...

Data from: Inbreeding shapes the evolution of marine invertebrates

Kevin Olsen, Will Ryan, Alice Winn, Ellen Kosman, Jose Moscoso, Stacy Krueger-Hadfield, Scott Burgess, David Carlon, Richard Grosberg, Susan Kalisz & Don Levitan
Inbreeding is a potent evolutionary force shaping the distribution of genetic variation within and among populations of plants and animals. Yet, our understanding of the forces shaping the expression and evolution of non-random mating in general, and inbreeding in particular, remains remarkably incomplete. Most research on plant mating systems focuses on self-fertilization and its consequences for automatic selection, inbreeding depression, purging, and reproductive assurance, whereas studies of animal mating systems have often assumed that inbreeding...

Data from: Evolutionary history of chimpanzees inferred from complete mitochondrial genomes

Adam Bjork, Weimin Liu, Joel O Wertheim, Beatrice H Hahn & Michael Worobey
Investigations into the evolutionary history of the common chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes, have produced inconsistent results, due to differences in the types of molecular data considered, the model assumptions employed, and the quantity and geographical range of samples used. We amplified and sequenced 24 complete P. troglodytes mitochondrial genomes from fecal samples collected at multiple study sites throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Using a ‘relaxed molecular clock,’ fossil calibrations, and 12 additional complete primate mitochondrial genomes, we analyzed...

Exploring the genetic consequences of clonality in haplodiplontic taxa

Stacy Krueger-Hadfield, Marie-Laure Guillemin, Christophe Destombe, Myriam Valero & Solenn Stoeckel
Partially clonality is an incredibly common reproductive mode found across all the major eukaryotic lineages. Yet, population genetic theory is based on exclusive sexuality or exclusive asexuality and partial clonality is often ignored. This is particularly true in haplodiplontic eukaryotes, including algae, ferns, mosses, and fungi, where somatic development occurs in both the haploid and diploid stages. Haplodiplontic life cycles are predicted to be correlated with asexuality, but tests of this prediction are rare. Moreover,...

Data from: An international, multi-stakeholder survey about metadata awareness, knowledge, and use in scholarly communications

Laura Paglione, Kathryn Kaiser, Michelle Urberg, Maria Johnsson, Jennifer Kemp & Alice Meadows
The Metadata 2020 initiative is an ongoing effort to bring various scholarly communications stakeholder groups together to promote principles and standards of practice to improve the quality of metadata. To understand the perspectives and practices of the main stakeholder groups (librarians, publishers, researchers and repository managers) regarding metadata, the Metadata 2020 Researcher Communications Project Group conducted a survey in the summer of 2019. The survey content was generated by representatives from the stakeholder groups who...

Market forces determine the distribution of a leaky function in a simple microbial community

Jeffrey Morris, Sarah Adkins-Jablonsky, Colleen Clark, Matthew Kuhl & Spiridon Papoulis
Many biological functions are leaky, and organisms that perform them contribute some of their products to a community "marketplace" where non-performing individuals may compete for them. Leaky functions are partitioned unequally in microbial communities, and the evolutionary forces determining which species perform them and which become beneficiaries are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that the market principle of comparative advantage determines the distribution of a leaky antibiotic resistance gene in an environment occupied by two...

Data from: Sustained fitness gains and variability in fitness trajectories in the long-term evolution experiment with Escherichia coli

Richard E. Lenski, Michael J. Wiser, Noah Ribeck, Zachary D. Blount, Joshua R. Nahum, James Jeffrey Morris, Luis Zaman, Caroline B. Turner, Brian D. Wade, Rohan Maddamsetti, Alita R. Burmeister, Elizabeth J. Baird, Jay Bundy, Nkrumah A. Grant, Kyle J. Card, Maia Rowles, Kiyana Weatherspoon, Spiridon E. Papoulis, Rachel Sullivan, Colleen Clark, Joseph S. Mulka & Neerja Hajela
Many populations live in environments subject to frequent biotic and abiotic changes. Nonetheless, it is interesting to ask whether an evolving population's mean fitness can increase indefinitely, and potentially without any limit, even in a constant environment. A recent study showed that fitness trajectories of Escherichia coli populations over 50 000 generations were better described by a power-law model than by a hyperbolic model. According to the power-law model, the rate of fitness gain declines...

Data from: Sea urchins in a high-CO2 world: the influence of acclimation on the immune response to ocean warming and acidification

Cecilia J. Brothers, Januar Harianto, James B. McClintock & Maria Byrne
Climate-induced ocean warming and acidification may render marine organisms more vulnerable to infectious diseases. We investigated the effects of warming and acidification on the immune response of the sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma. Sea urchins were gradually introduced to four combinations of temperature and pHNIST (17°C/pH 8.15, 17°C/pH 7.6, 23°C/pH 8.15 and 23°C/pH 7.6) and then held in temperature–pH treatments for 1, 15 or 30 days to determine if the immune response would adjust to stressors...

Data from: Cold adaptation increases rates of nutrient flow and metabolic plasticity during cold exposure in Drosophila melanogaster

Caroline M. Williams, Marshall D. McCue, Nishanth E. Sunny, Andre Szejner-Sigal, Theodore J. Morgan, David B. Allison & Daniel A. Hahn
Metabolic flexibility is an important component of adaptation to stressful environments, including thermal stress and latitudinal adaptation. A long history of population genetic studies suggest that selection on core metabolic enzymes may shape life histories by altering metabolic flux. However, the direct relationship between selection on thermal stress hardiness and metabolic flux has not previously been tested. We investigated flexibility of nutrient catabolism during cold stress in Drosophila melanogaster artificially selected for fast or slow...

Data from: Splicing factor SF3B1K700E mutant dysregulates erythroid differentiation via aberrant alternative splicing of transcription factor TAL1

Shuiling Jin, Hairui Su, Ngoc-Tung Tran, Jing Song, Sydney S. Lu, Ying Li, Suming Huang, Omar Abdel-Wahab, Yanyan Liu & Xinyang Zhao
More than 60% of myeloid dysplasia syndrome (MDS) contains mutations in genes encoding for splicing factors such as SF3B1, U2AF, SRSF2 and ZRSR2. Mutations in SF3B1 are associated with 80% cases of refractory anemia with ring sideroblast (RARS), a subtype of MDS. SF3B1K700E is the most frequently mutated site among mutations on SF3B1. Yet the molecular mechanisms on how mutations of splicing factors lead to defective erythropoiesis are not clear. SF3B1K700E mutant binds to an...

Data from: A new way to estimate neurologic disease prevalence in the United States

Lorene M. Nelson, Mitchell T. Wallin, Ruth Ann Marrie, W.J. Culpepper, Annette Langer-Gould, Jon Campbell, Stephen Buka, Helen Tremlett, Gary Cutter, Wendy Kaye, Laurie Wagner & Nicholas G. Larocca
Objective: Considerable gaps exist in knowledge regarding the prevalence of neurologic diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), in the United States. Therefore, the MS Prevalence Working Group sought to review and evaluate alternative methods for obtaining a scientifically valid estimate of national MS prevalence in the current health care era. Methods: We carried out a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis for 3 approaches to estimate MS prevalence: population-based MS registries, national probability health...

Supplement to: Sex and race differences in the risk of ischemic stroke associated with fasting blood glucose in REGARDS

Tracy Madsen, D. Leann Long, April P. Carson, George Howard, Dawn O. Kleindorfer, Karen L. Furie, JoAnn E. Manson, Simin Liu & Virginia J. Howard
Background: To investigate sex and race differences in the association between fasting blood glucose (FBG) and risk of ischemic stroke (IS). Methods: This prospective longitudinal cohort study included adults age ≥45 years at baseline in the Reasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke Study, followed for a median of 11.4 years. The exposure was baseline FBG (mg/dL); suspected IS events were ascertained by phone every 6 months and were physician-adjudicated. Cox proportional hazards were...

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