3 Works

Data from: Do differences in food web structure between organic and conventional farms affect the ecosystem service of pest control?

Sarina Macfadyen, Rachel Gibson, Andrew Polaszek, Rebecca J. Morris, Paul G. Craze, Robert Planqué, William O.C. Symondson & Jane Memmott
While many studies have demonstrated that organic farms support greater levels of biodiversity, it is not known whether this translates into better provision of ecosystem services. Here we use a food-web approach to analyse the community structure and function at the whole-farm scale. Quantitative food webs from 10 replicate pairs of organic and conventional farms showed that organic farms have significantly more species at three trophic levels (plant, herbivore and parasitoid) and significantly different network...

Data from: Ex situ diet influences the bacterial community associated with the skin of red-eyed tree frogs (Agalychnis callidryas)

Rachael E. Antwis, Rachel L. Haworth, Daniel J. P. Engelmoer, Victoria Ogilvy, Andrea L. Fidgett & Richard F. Preziosi
Amphibians support symbiotic bacterial communities on their skin that protect against a range of infectious pathogens, including the amphibian chytrid fungus. The conditions under which amphibians are maintained in captivity (e.g. diet, substrate, enrichment) in ex situ conservation programmes may affect the composition of the bacterial community. In addition, ex situ amphibian populations may support different bacterial communities in comparison to in situ populations of the same species. This could have implications for the suitability...

Data from: Intense competition between arbuscular mycorrhizal mutualists in an in vitro root microbiome negatively affects total fungal abundance

Daniel J. P. Engelmoer, Jocelyn E. Behm & E. Toby Kiers
The root microbiome is composed of an incredibly diverse microbial community that provides services to the plant. A major question in rhizosphere research is how species in root microbiome communities interact with each other and their host. In the nutrient mutualism between host plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), competition often leads to certain species dominating host colonization, with the outcome being dependent on environmental conditions. In the past, it has been difficult to quantify...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • VU University Amsterdam
    3
  • University of Sussex
    1
  • University of Manchester
    1
  • Natural History Museum
    1
  • Cardiff University
    1
  • University of Bristol
    1