17 Works

Data from: Selection for associative learning of color stimuli reveals correlated evolution of this learning ability across multiple stimuli and rewards.

Maartje Liefting, Katja M. Hoedjes, Cécile Le Lann, Hans M. Smid & Jacintha Ellers
We are only starting to understand how variation in cognitive ability can result from local adaptations to environmental conditions. A major question in this regard is to what extent selection on cognitive ability in a specific context affects that ability in general through correlated evolution. To address this question we performed artificial selection on visual associative learning in female Nasonia vitripennis wasps. Using appetitive conditioning in which a visual stimulus was offered in association with...

Data from: The cover uncovered: bark control over wood decomposition

Gbadamassi G.O. Dossa, Douglas Schaefer, Jiao-Lin Zhang, Jian-Ping Tao, Kun-Fang Cao, Richard T. Corlett, Anthony B. Cunningham, Jian-Chu Xu, Johannes H. C. Cornelissen, Rhett D. Harrison & Gbadamassi G. O. Dossa
1. Woody debris (WD) represents a globally significant carbon stock and its decomposition returns nutrients to the soil while providing habitat to microbes, plants and animals. Understanding what drives WD decomposition is therefore important. 2. WD decomposition rates differ greatly among species. However, the role of bark in the process remains poorly known. 3. We ask how, and how much, interspecific variation in bark functional traits related to growth and protection have afterlife effects on...

Data from: Differential effects of climate warming on reproduction and functional responses on insects in the fourth trophic level

Cong Chen, Rieta Gols, Arjen Biere & Jeffrey A. Harvey
1. Understanding effects of Anthropogenic Global Warming (AGW) on species interactions is essential for predicting community responses to climate change. However, while effects of AGW on resource-consumer interactions at the first- and second trophic level have been well studied, little is known about effects on interactions at higher trophic levels at the terminal end of food chains (e.g. in the third and fourth trophic levels). 2. Here, we examined the effects of temperature variability by...

Data from: Fuel moisture content enhances nonadditive effects of plant mixtures on flammability and fire behavior

Luke G. Blauw, Niki Wensink, Lisette Bakker, Richard S. P. Van Logtestijn, Rien Aerts, Nadejda A. Soudzilovskaia & J. Hans C. Cornelissen
Fire behavior of plant mixtures includes a complex set of processes for which the interactive contributions of its drivers, such as plant identity and moisture, have not yet been unraveled fully. Plant flammability parameters of species mixtures can show substantial deviations of fire properties from those expected based on the component species when burnt alone; that is, there are nonadditive mixture effects. Here, we investigated how fuel moisture content affects nonadditive effects in fire behavior....

Data from: Responses of insect herbivores and their food plants to wind exposure and the importance of predation risk

Cong Chen, Arjen Biere, Rieta Gols, Wouter Halfwerk, Kees Van Oers & Jeffrey A. Harvey
1. Wind is an important abiotic factor that influences an array of biological processes, but it is rarely considered in studies on plant-herbivore interactions. 2. Here, we tested whether wind exposure could directly or indirectly affect the performance of two insect herbivores, Plutella xylostella and Pieris brassicae, feeding on Brassica nigra plants. 3. In a greenhouse study using a factorial design, B. nigra plants were exposed to different wind regimes generated by fans before and...

Data from: Can social partnerships influence the microbiome? insights from ant farmers and their trophobiont mutualists.

Aniek B.F. Ivens, Alice Gadau, E. Toby Kiers, Daniel J.C. Kronauer, Aniek B. F. Ivens & Daniel J. C. Kronauer
Mutualistic interactions with microbes have played a crucial role in the evolution and ecology of animal hosts. However, it is unclear what factors are most important in influencing particular host-microbe associations. While closely related animal species may have more similar microbiota than distantly related ones due to phylogenetic contingencies, social partnerships with other organisms, such as those in which one animal farms another, may also influence an organism’s symbiotic microbiome. We studied a mutualistic network...

Data from: Nonadditive effects of consumption in an intertidal macroinvertebrate community are independent of food availability but driven by complementarity effects

Emily M. Van Egmond, Peter M. Van Bodegom, Jurgen R. Van Hal, Richard S.P. Van Logtestijn, Matty P. Berg, Rien Aerts & Richard S. P. Van Logtestijn
Suboptimal environmental conditions are ubiquitous in nature and commonly drive the outcome of biological interactions in community processes. Despite the importance of biological interactions for community processes, knowledge on how species interactions are affected by a limiting resource, e.g. low food availability, remains limited. Here, we tested whether variation in food supply causes non-additive consumption patterns, using the macroinvertebrate community of intertidal sandy beaches as a model system. We quantified isotopically labelled diatom consumption by...

Data from: Winter cover crop legacy effects on litter decomposition act through litter quality and microbial community changes

Janna M. Barel, Thomas W. Kuyper, Jos Paul, Wietse De Boer, Johannes H. C. Cornelissen & Gerlinde B. De Deyn
1. In agriculture, winter cover crop (WCC) residues are incorporated into the soil to improve soil quality, as gradual litter decomposition can improve fertility. Decomposition rate is determined by litter quality, local soil abiotic and biotic properties. However, how these factors are interlinked and influenced by cropping history is unclear. 2. We grew WCC monocultures and mixtures in rotation with main crops Avena sativa and Cichorium endivia and tested how crop rotation influences WCC litter...

Data from: Inter- and intraspecific variation in leaf economics traits in wheat and maize

Adam R. Martin, Christine E. Hale, Bruno E. L. Cerabolini, Johannes H. C. Cornelissen, Joseph Craine, William A. Gough, Jens Kattge & Cairan K. F. Tirona
Leaf economics spectrum (LES) trait variation underpins multiple agroecological processes and many prominent crop yield models. While there are numerous independent studies assessing trait variation in crops, to date there have been no comprehensive assessments of intraspecific trait variation (ITV) in LES traits for wheat and maize: the world’s most widespread crops. Using trait databases and peer-reviewed literature, we compiled over 700 records of specific leaf area (SLA), maximum photosynthetic rates (Amax), and leaf nitrogen...

Data from: Diversity in form and function: vertical distribution of soil fauna mediates multidimensional trait variation

Jacintha Ellers, Matty P. Berg, André T.C. Dias, Simone Fontana, Astra Ooms & Marco Moretti
1. It has been widely recognized that species show extensive variation in form and function. Based on species’ attributes they can be positioned along major axes of variation, which are often defined by life history traits, such as number of offspring, age at maturity or generation time. Less emphasis has been given in this respect to tolerance traits, especially to resistance to abiotic stress conditions, which often determine community (dis)assembly and distribution. 2. Soil fauna...

Data from: Optimized flocking of autonomous drones in confined environments

Gábor Vásárhelyi, Csaba Virágh, Gergő Somorjai, Tamás Nepusz, Agoston E. Eiben & Tamás Vicsek
We address a fundamental issue of collective motion of aerial robots: how to ensure that large flocks of autonomous drones seamlessly navigate in confined spaces. The numerous existing flocking models are rarely tested on actual hardware because they typically neglect some crucial aspects of multirobot systems. Constrained motion and communication capabilities, delays, perturbations, or the presence of barriers should be modeled and treated explicitly because they have large effects on collective behavior during the cooperation...

Data from: Forest loss in protected areas and intact forest landscapes: a global analysis

Matias Heino, Matti Kummu, Marika Makkonen, Mark Mulligan, Peter H. Verburg, Mika Jalava & Timo A. Räsänen
In spite of the high importance of forests, global forest loss has remained alarmingly high during the last decades. Forest loss at a global scale has been unveiled with increasingly finer spatial resolution, but the forest extent and loss in protected areas (PAs) and in large intact forest landscapes (IFLs) have not so far been systematically assessed. Moreover, the impact of protection on preserving the IFLs is not well understood. In this study we conducted...

Data from: Functional diversity of Collembola is reduced in soils subjected to short-term, but not long-term, geothermal warming

Martin Holmstrup, Bodil K. Ehlers, Stine Slotsbo, Krassimira Ilieva-Makulec, Bjarni Diðrik Sigurðsson, Niki I. Leblans, Jacintha Ellers, Matty P. Berg, Niki I. W. Leblans & Bjarni D. Sigurdsson
1. Human activities have caused global changes of atmospheric chemistry resulting in increased temperature especially in the colder regions of the northern hemisphere. Since warming of the environment can have drastic effects on terrestrial ecosystems it is important to experimentally evaluate the extent of such effects in long-term field-based experiments. In the present study we make use of both recent (short-term) and long-term geothermal warming of Icelandic soils to examine the responses of Collembola, an...

Data from: Adaptive changes in sexual signaling in response to urbanization

Wouter Halfwerk, Michiel Blaas, Lars Kramer, Nadia Hijner, Paula A. Trillo, Ximena E. Bernal, Rachel A. Page, Sandra Goutte, Michael J. Ryan & Jacintha Ellers
Urbanization can cause species to adjust their sexual displays, as the effectiveness of mating signals is impacted by environmental conditions. Despite many examples showing that mating signals in urban conditions differ from those in rural conditions, we do not know whether these differences provide a combined reproductive and survival benefit to the urban phenotype. Here we show that male túngara frogs have increased the conspicuousness of their calls, which is under strong sexual and natural...

Data from: Large and fast human pyramidal neurons associate with intelligence

Natalia A Goriounova, Djai B Heyer, René Wilbers, Matthijs B Verhoog, Michele Giugliano, Christophe Verbist, Joshua Obermayer, Amber Kerkhofs, Harriët Smeding, Maaike Verberne, Sander Idema, Johannes C Baayen, Anton W Pieneman, Christiaan PJ De Kock, Martin Klein & Huibert D Mansvelder
It is generally assumed that human intelligence relies on efficient processing by neurons in our brain. Although gray matter thickness and activity of temporal and frontal cortical areas correlate with IQ scores, no direct evidence exists that links structural and physiological properties of neurons to human intelligence. Here, we find that high IQ scores and large temporal cortical thickness associate with larger, more complex dendrites of human pyramidal neurons. We show in silico that larger...

Data from: Stress‐induced secondary leaves of a boreal deciduous shrub (Vaccinium myrtillus) overwinter then regain activity the following growing season

Jarle W. Bjerke, Grzegorz Wierzbinski, Hans Tømmervik, Gareth K. Phoenix & Stef Bokhorst
The ericoid shrub Vaccinium myrtillus is one of several deciduous boreal plants that respond to larval defoliation by compensatory production of a new set of leaves within the same growing season soon after defoliation. This new set is termed as ‘secondary leaves’. The physiological performance and longevity of secondary leaves is poorly understood. Following a multi‐year larval outbreak in boreal Norway, we therefore monitored the fate of the secondary leaves from 2014 to 2016. We...

Data from: Spatial and temporal diversity in hyperparasitoid communities of Cotesia glomerata on garlic mustard, Alliaria petiolata

Robin Heinen & Jeffrey A. Harvey
1. Interactions between two trophic levels can be very intimate, often making species dependent on each other, something that increases with specialisation. Some specialised multivoltine herbivores may depend on multiple plant species for their survival over the course of a growing season, especially if their food plants are short‐lived and grow at different times. Later generations may exploit different plant species from those exploited by previous generations. 2. Multivoltine parasitoids as well as their natural...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    17

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    17

Affiliations

  • VU University Amsterdam
    17
  • Wageningen University & Research
    4
  • University of Groningen
    3
  • Leiden University
    3
  • University of Antwerp
    2
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    2
  • University of Sheffield
    2
  • New York University Abu Dhabi
    1
  • Molde University College
    1
  • Murdoch University
    1