6 Works

Data from: Kin-bias, breeding site selection, and female fitness in a cannibalistic Neotropical frog

Pavitra Muralidhar, Fábio P. De Sá, Célio F. B. Haddad & Kelly R. Zamudio
Resource availability influences sexual selection within populations and determines whether behaviours such as territoriality or resource sharing are adaptive. In Thoropa taophora, a frog endemic to the Atlantic Coastal Rainforest of Brazil, males compete for and defend limited breeding sites while females often share breeding sites with other females; however, sharing breeding sites may involve costs due to cannibalism by conspecific tadpoles. We studied a breeding population of T. taophora to determine (i) whether this...

Data from: A new species of Allophryne (Anura: Allophrynidae) from the Atlantic Rain Forest biome of eastern Brazil

Ulisses Caramaschi, Victor G. D. Orrico, Julián Faivovich, Iuri R. Dias & Mirco Solé
A new species of the genus Allophryne is described and, in contrast to its congeners that occur in the Amazon Basin, is based on specimens obtained in Uruçuca, State of Bahia, in the Atlantic Rain Forest of eastern Brazil. Allophryne relicta sp. nov. is characterized by a medium body size for the genus (snout–vent length range 19.9–21.9 mm in males); large head (head width about 35% of SVL); large, red-orange eyes, with a large black...

Data from: Cryptic genetic diversity is paramount in small-bodied amphibians of the genus Euparkerella (Anura: Craugastoridae) endemic to the Brazilian Atlantic Forest

Luciana A. Fusinatto, João Alexandrino, Célio F. B. Haddad, Tuliana O. Brunes, Carlos F. D. Rocha & Fernando Sequeira
Morphological similarity associated to restricted distributions and low dispersal abilities make the direct developing “Terrarana” frogs of the genus Euparkerella a good model for examining diversification processes. We here infer phylogenetic relationships within the genus Euparkerella, using DNA sequence data from one mitochondrial and four nuclear genes coupled with traditional Bayesian phylogenetic reconstruction approaches and more recent coalescent methods of species tree inference. We also used Bayesian clustering analysis and a recent Bayesian coalescent-based approach...

Data from: Functional extinction of birds drives rapid evolutionary changes in seed size.

Mauro Galetti, Roger Guevara, Marina C. Côrtes, Fadini Rodrigo, Sandro Von Matter, Abraão B. Leite, Fábio Labecca, Thiago Ribeiro, Carolina S. Carvalho, Rosane G. Collevatti, Mathias M. Pires, , Pedro H. Brancalion, Milton C. Ribeiro & Pedro Jordano
Local extinctions have cascading effects on ecosystem functions, yet little is known about the potential for the rapid evolutionary change of species in human-modified scenarios. We show that the functional extinction of large-gape seed dispersers in the Brazilian Atlantic forest is associated with the consistent reduction of seed size of a keystone palm species. Among 22 palm populations, areas deprived of large avian frugivores for several decades present smaller seeds than non-defaunated forests, with negative...

Data from: Systematics of spiny-backed treefrogs (Hylidae: Osteocephalus): an Amazonian puzzle

Karl-Heinz Jungfer, Julián Faivovich, José M. Padial, Santiago Castroviejo-Fisher, Mariana M. Lyra, Bianca Von Muller Berneck, Patricia P. Iglesias, Philippe J. R. Kok, Ross T. Macculloch, Miguel Trefaut Rodrigues, Vanessa K. Verdade, Claudia P. Torres Gastello, Juan Carlos Chaparro, Paula H. Valdujo, Steffen Reichle, Jiří Moravec, Václav Gvoždík, Giussepe Gagliardi-Urrutia, Raffael Ernst, Ignacio De La Riva, Donald Bruce Means, Albertina P. Lima, J. Celsa Señaris, Ward C. Wheeler & Célio F. B. Haddad
Spiny-backed tree frogs of the genus Osteocephalus are conspicuous components of the tropical wet forests of the Amazon and the Guiana Shield. Here, we revise the phylogenetic relationships of Osteocephalus and its sister group Tepuihyla, using up to 6134 bp of DNA sequences of nine mitochondrial and one nuclear gene for 338 specimens from eight countries and 218 localities, representing 89% of the 28 currently recognized nominal species. Our phylogenetic analyses reveal (i) the paraphyly...

Data from: Long-term endemism of two highly divergent lineages of the amphibian-killing fungus in the Atlantic Forest of Brazil

David Rodriguez, Carlos G. Becker, Nadya C. Pupin, Célio F. B. Haddad & Kelly R. Zamudio
The recent global spread of the amphibian-killing fungus [Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd)] has been closely tied to anthropogenic activities; however, regional patterns of spread are not completely understood. Using historical samples, we can test whether Bd was a spreading or endemic pathogen in a region within a particular time frame, because those two disease states provide different predictions for the regional demographic dynamics and population genetics of Bd. Testing historical patterns of pathogen prevalence and population...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • Sao Paulo State University
    6
  • Bernardino Rivadavia Natural Sciences Museum
    2
  • University of Sao Paulo
    2
  • Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro
    2
  • Cornell University
    2
  • Universidade Federal de Goiás
    1
  • National Museum
    1
  • University of Buenos Aires
    1
  • Royal Ontario Museum
    1
  • National Institute of Amazonian Research
    1