75 Works

Data package from 'Pantropical variability in tree crown allometry' Global Ecology and Biogeography 2021. DOI: 10.1111/geb.13231

Grace Jopaul Loubota Panzou, Adeline Fayolle, Tommaso Jucker, Oliver Phillips, Stephanie Bohlman, Lindsay F. Banin, Simon L. Lewis, Kofi Affum-Baffoe, Luciana F. Alves, Cécile Antin, Eric Arets, Luzmila Arroyo, Timothy R. Baker, Nicolas Barbier, Hans Beeckman, Uta Berger, Yannick Enock Bocko, Frans Bongers, Sam Bowers, Thom Brade, Eduardo S. Brondizio, Arthur Chantrain, Jerome Chave, Halidou Compaore & David Coomes

Data from: Peculiar macrophagous adaptations in a new Cretaceous pliosaurid

Valentin Fischer, Maxim S. Arkhangelsky, Ilya M. Stenshin, Gleb N. Uspensky, Nikolay G. Zverkov & Roger B. J. Benson
During the Middle and Late Jurassic, pliosaurid plesiosaurs evolved gigantic body size and a series of craniodental adaptations that have been linked to the occupation of an apex predator niche. Cretaceous pliosaurids (i.e. Brachaucheninae) depart from this morphology, being slightly smaller and lacking the macrophagous adaptations seen in earlier forms. However, the fossil record of Early Cretaceous pliosaurids is poor, concealing the evolution and ecological diversity of the group. Here, we report a new pliosaurid...

Data from: Facultative paedomorphosis as a mechanism promoting intraspecific niche differentiation

Benjamin Lejeune, Nicolas Sturaro, Gilles Lepoint & Mathieu Denoel
Organisms with complex life cycles are characterized by a metamorphosis that allows for a major habitat shift and the exploitation of alternative resources. However, metamorphosis can be bypassed in some species through a process called paedomorphosis, resulting in the retention of larval traits at the adult stage and is considered important at both micro- and macroevolutionary scales. In facultatively paedomorphic populations of newts, some individuals retain gills and a fully aquatic life at the adult...

Data from: Next-generation sequencing for rodent barcoding: species identification from fresh, degraded and environmental samples

Maxime Galan, Marie Pagès & Jean-François Cosson
Rodentia is the most diverse order among mammals, with more than 2,000 species currently described. Most of the time, species assignation is so difficult based on morphological data solely that identifying rodents at the specific level corresponds to a real challenge. In this study, we compared the applicability of 100 bp mini-barcodes from cytochrome b and cytochrome c oxidase 1 genes to enable rodent species identification. Based on GenBank sequence datasets of 115 rodent species,...

Data from: A new Devonian euthycarcinoid evidences the use of different respiratory strategies during the marine-to-terrestrial transition in the myriapod lineage

Pierre Gueriau, James C. Lamsdell, Roy A. Wogelius, Phillip L. Manning, Victoria M. Egerton, Uwe Bergmann, Loïc Bertrand & Julien Denayer
Myriapods were, together with arachnids, the earliest animals to occupy terrestrial ecosystems, by at least the Silurian. The origin of myriapods and their land colonization have long remained puzzling until euthycarcinoids, an extinct group of aquatic arthropods considered amphibious, were shown to be stem group myriapods, extending the lineage to the Cambrian and evidencing a marine-to-terrestrial transition. Although possible respiratory structures comparable to the air-breathing tracheal system of myriapods are visible in several euthycarcinoids, little...

Data from: The ovipositor actuation mechanism of a parasitic wasp and its functional implications

Noraly M.M.E. Van Meer, Uroš Cerkvenik, Christian M. Schlepütz, Johan L. Van Leeuwen & Sander W. S. Gussekloo
Parasitic wasps use specialized needle-like structures­­—ovipositors—to drill in substrates to reach hidden hosts. The external ovipositor (terebra) consists of three interconnected, sliding elements (valvulae) which are moved reciprocally during insertion. This presumably reduces the required pushing force on the terebra and limits the risk of damage whilst probing. Although this is an important mechanism, it is still not completely understood how the actuation of the valvulae is achieved, and it has only been studied with...

Efficient production of few-layer black phosphorus by liquid-phase exfoliation

Ghassane Tiouitchi, Mustapha Ait Ali, Abdelilah Benyoussef, Mohammed Hamedoun, Abdessadek Lachgar, Abdelkader Kara, Ahmed Ennaoui, Abdelfattah Mahmoud, Frederic Boschini, Hamid Oughaddou, Amine El Moutaouakil, Abdellah El Kenz & Omar Mounkachi
Phosphorene is a new 2D material that has recently attracted much attention owing to its fascinating electrical, optical, thermal, and chemical properties. Here, we report on high-quality exfoliation of black phosphorus nanosheets, with controllable size produced in large quantities by liquid phase exfoliation using N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as a solvent under ambient conditions. The as-synthesized few layers show a great potential for solar energy conversion based on the optical results shown in this work.

First use of acoustic calls to distinguish cryptic fish species: Dascyllus aruanus complex as a case study

Eric Parmentier, Eric Parmentier, Robin Scalbert, Xavier Raick, Camille Gache, Bruno Frédérich, Frederic Bertucci & David Lecchini
From a practical point of view, the determination of species in the wild is based on their phenotypes. Consequently, many species remain unknown because they are visually indistinguishable from described species. Although molecular methods and advances in bioacoustical analysis have been extensively used to uncover cryptic species, the combination of both methodologies is still rare and concerns only some terrestrial taxa such as insects, bats, frogs and birds. In this study, we aim to determine...

Genetic architecture of individual variation in recombination rate on the X-chromosome in cattle

Tom Druet
Meiotic recombination is an essential biological process that ensures proper chromosome segregation and creates genetic diversity. Individual variation in global recombination rates has been shown to be heritable in several species and variants significantly associated with this trait have been identified. Recombination on the sex chromosome has often been ignored in these studies although this trait may be particularly interesting as it may correspond to a biological process distinct from that on autosomes. For instance,...

An evaluation of inbreeding measures using a whole genome sequenced cattle pedigree

Tom Druet, Setegn Worku Alemu, Naveen Kumar Kadri, Pierre Faux, Chad Harland, Carole Charlier & Armando Caballero
The estimation of the inbreeding coefficient (F) is essential for the study of inbreeding depression (ID) or for the management of populations under conservation. Several methods have been proposed to estimate the realized F using genetic markers, but it remains unclear which one should be used. Here we used whole-genome sequence data for 245 individuals from a Holstein cattle pedigree to empirically evaluate which estimators best capture homozygosity at variants causing ID, such as rare...

Data associated with: Global ecomorphological restructuring of dominant marine reptiles prior to the K/Pg mass extinction

Jamie MacLaren, Rebecca Bennion, Nathalie Bardet & Valentin Fischer
Mosasaurid squamates were the dominant amniote predators in marine ecosystems during most of the Late Cretaceous. Here, we use a suite of biomechanically rooted, functionally descriptive ratios in a framework adapted from population ecology to investigate how the morphofunctional disparity of mosasaurids evolved prior to the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K/Pg) mass extinction. Our results suggest that taxonomic turnover in mosasaurid community composition from Campanian to Maastrichtian is reflected by a notable global increase in morphofunctional disparity, especially...

Semi-artificial datasets as a resource for validation of bioinformatics pipelines for plant virus detection

Lucie Tamisier, Annelies Haegeman, Yoika Foucart, Nicolas Fouillien, Maher Al Rwahnih, Nihal Buzkan, Thierry Candresse, Michela Chiumenti, Kris De Jonghe, Marie Lefebvre, Paolo Margaria, Jean Sébastien Reynard, Kristian Stevens, Denis Kutnjak & Sébastien Massart
In the last decade, High-Throughput Sequencing (HTS) has revolutionized biology and medicine. This technology allows the sequencing of huge amount of DNA and RNA fragments at a very low price. In medicine, HTS tests for disease diagnostics are already brought into routine practice. However, the adoption in plant health diagnostics is still limited. One of the main bottlenecks is the lack of expertise and consensus on the standardization of the data analysis. The Plant Health...

Data from: Similar levels of trophic and functional diversity within damselfish assemblages across Indo–Pacific coral reefs

Laura Gajdzik, Eric Parmentier, Loïc N. Michel, Nicolas Sturaro, Keryea Soong, Gilles Lepoint & Bruno Frédérich
1. Understanding the forces that influence the dynamics of communities is a key challenge to undertake in changing environments. Despite recent advances in coral reef community ecology, a more comprehensive knowledge about processes (niche related–traits and phylogenies) driving the composition of reef fish community is needed. 2. Here, we conducted a quantitative comparison of these processes in damselfish assemblages that belong to three distinct Indo–Pacific coral reefs differing in taxonomic composition, morphology and degree of...

Data from: The scent of inbreeding: male sex pheromones betray inbred males

Erik Van Bergen, Paul M. Brakefield, Stéphanie Heuskin, Bas J. Zwaan & Caroline M. Nieberding
Inbreeding depression results from mating among genetically related individuals and impairs reproductive success. The decrease in male mating success is usually attributed to an impact on multiple fitness-related traits that reduce the general condition of inbred males. Here we find that the production of the male sex pheromone is reduced significantly by inbreeding in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana. Other traits indicative of the general condition, including flight performance, are also negatively affected in male butterflies...

Data from: From animal tracks to fine-scale movement modes: a straightforward approach for identifying multiple, spatial movement patterns

Kevin Morelle, Nils Bunnefeld, Philippe Lejeune & Steve A. Oswald
1. Thanks to developments in animal tracking technology, detailed data on the movement tracks of individual animals are now attainable for many species. However, straightforward methods to decompose individual tracks into high-resolution, spatial modes are lacking but are essential to understand what an animal is doing. 2. We developed an analytical approach that combines separately-validated methods into a straightforward tool for converting animal GPS tracks to short-range movement modes. Our three-step analytical process comprises: (1)...

Data from: Timing of perineuronal nets development in the zebra finch song control system correlates with developmental song learning

Gilles Cornez, Elisabeth Jonckers, Sita M. Ter Haar, Annemie Van Der Linden, Charlotte A. Cornil & Jacques Balthazart
The appearance of perineuronal nets (PNN) represents one of the mechanisms that contribute to the closing of sensitive periods for neural plasticity. This relationship has mostly been studied in the ocular dominance model in rodents. Previous studies also indicated that PNN might control neural plasticity in the song control system (SCS) of songbirds. To further elucidate this relationship, we quantified PNN expression and their localization around parvalbumin interneurons at key time-points during ontogeny in both...

Data from: The size at reproduction of canopy tree species in central Africa

Dakis-Yaoba Ouédraogo, Jean-Louis Doucet, Kasso Daïnou, Fidèle Baya, Achille Bernard Biwolé, Nils Bourland, Fousséni Fétéké, Jean-François Gillet, Yao Lambert Kouadio & Adeline Fayolle
Size at reproduction is a key aspect of species life history that has been little explored for long-lived tropical trees. In this study, we aimed to quantify reproductive diameter for 31 major timber species across 11 sites in Cameroon, Congo, and Central African Republic. Specifically, we examined (1) whether between-species variability can be explained by a set of seven species traits; (2) whether reproductive diameter varied within-species among sites; (3) whether reproductive status varied with...

Data from: How bees deter elephants: beehive trials with forest elephants (Loxodonta africana cyclotis) in Gabon

Steeve Ngama, Lisa Korte, Jérôme Bindelle, Cédric Vermeulen & John R. Poulsen
In Gabon, like elsewhere in Africa, crops are often sources of conflict between humans and wildlife. Wildlife damage to crops can drastically reduce income, amplifying poverty and creating a negative perception of wild animal conservation among rural people. In this context, crop-raiding animals like elephants quickly become “problem animals”. To deter elephants from raiding crops beehives have been successfully employed in East Africa; however, this method has not yet been tested in Central Africa. We...

Data from: Biotic predictors complement models of bat and bird responses to climate and tree diversity in European forests

Luc Barbaro, Eric Allan, Evy Ampoorter, Bastien Castagneyrol, Yohan Charbonnier, Hans De Wandeler, Christian Kerbiriou, Harriet Milligan, Aude Vialatte, Monique Carnol, Marc Deconchat, Pallieter De Smedt, Herve Jactel, Julia Koricheva, Isabelle Le Viol, Bart Muys, Michael Scherer-Lorenzen, Kris Verheyen & Fons Van Der Plas
Bats and birds are key providers of ecosystem services in forests. How climate and habitat jointly shape their communities is well studied, but whether biotic predictors from other trophic levels may improve bird and bat diversity models is less known, especially across large bioclimatic gradients. Here, we achieved multi-taxa surveys in 209 mature forests replicated in six European countries from Spain to Finland, to investigate the importance of biotic predictors (i.e., the abundance or activity...

Data from: Partitioning the relative contribution of one-phase and two-phase seed dispersal when evaluating seed dispersal effectiveness

Laurence Culot, Marie-Claude Huynen & Eckhard W. Heymann
Seed dispersal effectiveness (SDE) is a conceptual framework that aims at quantifying the contribution of seed dispersal vectors to plant fitness. While it is well recognized that diplochorous dispersal systems, characterized by two successive dispersal steps performed by two different vectors (Phase I = primary seed dispersal and Phase II = secondary seed dispersal) are common in temperate and tropical regions, little attention has been given to distinguishing the relative contribution of one-phase and two-phase...

Data from: Understanding the recruitment response of juvenile Neotropical trees to logging intensity using functional traits

J. Aaron Hogan, Bruno Hérault, Bénédicte Bachelot, Anaїs Gorel, Marianne Jounieaux & Christopher Baraloto
Selective-logging remains a widespread practice in tropical forests, yet the long-term effects of timber-harvest on juvenile tree (i.e., sapling) recruitment across the hundreds of species occurring in most tropical forests, remain difficult to predict. This uncertainty could potentially exacerbate threats to some of the thousands of timber-valuable tree species in the Amazon. Our objective was to determine to what extent long-term responses of tree species regeneration in logged forests can be explained by their functional...

Termite dispersal is influenced by their diet

Simon Hellemans, Jan Šobotník, Gilles Lepoint, Martin Mihaljevič, Yves Roisin & Thomas Bourguignon
Termites feed on vegetal matter at various stages of decomposition. Lineages of wood- and soil-feeding termites are distributed across terrestrial ecosystems located between 45°N and 45°S of latitude, a distribution they acquired through many transoceanic dispersal events. While wood-feeding termites often live in the wood on which they feed and are efficient at dispersing across oceans by rafting, soil-feeders are believed to be poor dispersers. Therefore, their distribution across multiple continents requires an explanation. Here,...

Data from: Periodic environmental disturbance drives repeated ecomorphological diversification in an adaptive radiation of Antarctic fishes

Elyse Parker, Katerina L. Zapfe, Jagriti Yadav, Bruno Frédérich, Christopher D. Jones, Evan P. Economo, Sarah Federman, Thomas J. Near & Alex Dornburg
The ecological theory of adaptive radiation has profoundly shaped our conceptualization of the rules that govern diversification. However, while many radiations follow classic early burst patterns of diversification as they fill ecological space, the longer-term fates of these radiations depend on many factors, such as climatic stability. In systems with periodic disturbances, species-rich clades can contain nested adaptive radiations of subclades with their own distinct diversification histories, and how adaptive radiation theory applies in these...

Unprecedented biting performance in herbivorous fish: how the complex biting system of Pomacentridae circumvents performance trade-offs

Damien Olivier, Sam Van Wassenbergh, Eric Parmentier & Bruno Frédérich
It is well accepted that the complexity of functional systems may mitigate performance trade-offs. However, data supporting this theory is hard to find because it needs to be based on a functional system with different complexity levels in closely-related species. The Pomacentridae (damselfishes) provide an excellent opportunity to test the hypothesis because most of the species have two mouth-closing systems: the first using the adductor mandibulae, as in all teleost fishes, and a second one...

Data from: Toward a standardised protocol for the stable isotope analysis of scleractinian corals

Nicolas Sturaro, Yunli Eric Hsieh, Qi Chen, Pei-Ling Wang & Vianney Denis
Rationale: The stable isotope analysis of carbon and nitrogen is a powerful tool in many ecological studies, but different sample treatments may affect stable isotope ratios and hamper comparisons among studies. The goal of this study was to determine whether treatments that are commonly used to prepare scleractinian coral samples for stable isotope analysis yield different δ15N and δ13C values, and to provide guidelines toward a standardised protocol. Methods: The animal tissues and Symbiodiniaceae of...

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