16 Works

The trisaccharide melezitose impacts honey bees and their intestinal microbiota

Victoria Seeburger, Paul D'Alvise, Basel Shaaban, Karsten Schweikert, Getrud Lohaus, Annette Schroeder & Martin Hasselmann
In general, honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) feed on honey produced from collected nectar. In the absence of nectar, during certain times of the year or in monocultural landscapes, honey bees forage on honeydew. Honeydew is excreted by different herbivores of the order Hemiptera that consume phloem sap of plant species. In comparison to nectar, honeydew is composed of a higher variety of sugars and additional sugars with higher molecular weight, like the trisaccharide melezitose...

Date from: Foundation species promote local adaptation and fine-scale distribution of herbaceous plants

Michael O'Brien, Elisa Carbonell, Gianalberto Losapio, Philipp Schlüter & Christian Schöb
1) Interactions among neighbors can alter demography and traits of commingled species via adaptation or plasticity in phenotypic expression and understanding these two mechanisms in diverse communities is important for determining the ecological and evolutionary consequences of plant–plant interactions. 2) We reciprocally transplanted perennial species (Arenaria armerina and Festuca indigesta) among patches of two foundation shrub species and open ground to assess whether origin microsite (defined as the spatially distinct abiotic and biotic conditions associated...

Inter- and intraspecific selection in alien plants: how population growth, functional traits and climate responses change with residence time

Marco Brendel, Frank Schurr & Christine Sheppard
Aim: When alien species are introduced to new ranges, climate or trait mismatches may initially constrain their population growth. However, inter- and intraspecific selection in the new environment should cause population growth rates to increase with residence time. Using a species-for-time approach, we test whether with increasing residence time (a) negative effects of climatic mismatches between the species’ new and native range on population growth weaken, and (b) functional traits converge towards values that maximize...

Data from: Shifts in plant functional community composition under hydrological stress strongly decelerate litter decomposition

Julia Walter, Carsten Buchmann & Frank Schurr
Litter decomposition is a key process of nutrient and carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. The decomposition process will likely be altered under ongoing climate change, both through direct effects on decomposer activity, and through indirect effects caused by changes in litter quality. We studied how hydrological change indirectly affects decomposition via plant functional community restructuring caused by changes in plant species´ relative abundances (community weighted mean traits (CWM) and functional diversity). We further assessed how...

Environmental heterogeneity predicts global species richness patterns better than area

Kristy Udy, Matthias Fritsch, Katrin Meyer, Ingo Grass, Sebastian Hanß, Florian Hartig, Thomas Kneib, Hoger Kreft, Collins Kukuna, Guy Pe'er, Hannah Reininghaus, Britta Tietjen, Clara-Sophie Van Waveren, Kerstin Wiegand & Teja Tscharntke
Aim: It is widely accepted that biodiversity can be determined by niche-relate processes and by pure area effects from local to global scales. Their relative importance, however, is still disputed, and empirical tests are still surprisingly scarce at the global scale. We compare the explanatory power of area and environmental heterogeneity as a proxy for niche-related processes as drivers of native mammal species richnessworldwide and with biogeographical regions. Location: Global Time Period: Data was collated...

Diversification in evolutionary arenas – assessment and synthesis

Nicolai M. Nürk, H. Peter Linder, Renske E. Onstein, Matthew J. Larcombe, Colin E. Hughes, Laura Piñeiro Fernández, Philipp M. Schlüter, Luis Valente, Carl Beierkuhnlein, Vanessa Cutts, Michael J. Donoghue, Erika J. Edwards, Richard Field, Suzette G.A. Flantua, Steven I. Higgins, Anke Jentsch, Sigrid Liede-Schumann & Michael D. Pirie
Understanding how and why rates of evolutionary diversification vary is a central issue in evolutionary biology, ecology and biogeography. The concept of adaptive radiation has attracted much interest, but is metaphorical and verbal in nature, making it difficult to quantitatively compare different evolutionary lineages or geographic regions. In addition, the causes of evolutionary stasis are relatively neglected. Here we review the central concepts in the evolutionary diversification literature and bring these together by proposing a...

Data from: Biomass–density relationships of plant communities deviate from the self‐thinning rule due to age structure and abiotic stress

Maximiliane Herberich, Sebastian Gayler, Madhur Anand, Katja Tielbörger & Maximiliane Marion Herberich
A pertinent debate in plant ecology centers around the generality of the self-thinning rule. However, studies focused on highly simplified settings such as even-aged monospecific populations or optimal conditions. This neglects the fact that most natural communities, to which the classical self-thinning slope is often applied, are age-structured, composed of multiple species and exposed to various types of abiotic stress. With the help of an individual-based model, we relax these simplified assumptions and systematically test...

Data from: Biocultural approaches to sustainability: a systematic review of the scientific literature

Jan Hanspach, L. Jamila Haider, Elisa Oteris-Rozas, Anton Stahl Olafsson, Natalie Gulsrud, Chris Raymond, Mario Torralba, Berta Martín-López, Claudia Bieling, María García Martín, Christian Albert, Thomas Beery, Nora Fagerholm, Isabel Díaz-Reviriego, Annika Drews-Shambroom & Tobias Plieninger
Current sustainability challenges demand approaches that acknowledge a plurality of human-nature interactions and worldviews, for which biocultural approaches are considered appropriate and timely. This systematic review analyses the application of biocultural approaches to sustainability in scientific journal articles published between 1990 and 2018 through a mixed methods approach combining qualitative content analysis and quantitative multivariate methods. The study identifies seven distinct biocultural lenses, i.e. different ways of understanding and applying biocultural approaches, which to different...

Data from: Land-use intensification increases richness of native and exotic herbaceous plants, but not endemics, in Malagasy vanilla landscapes

Estelle Raveloaritiana, Annemarie Wurz, Ingo Grass, Kristina Osen, Marie Rolande Soazafy, Dominic A. Martin, Lucien Faliniaina, Nantenaina H. Rakotomalala, Maria S. Vorontsova, Teja Tscharntke & Bakolimalala Rakouth
Aim: North‐eastern Madagascar is a hotspot of plant diversity, but vanilla and rice farming are driving land‐use change, including slash‐and‐burn management. It still remains unknown how land‐use change and land‐use history affect richness and composition of endemic, native and exotic herbaceous plant species. Location: North‐eastern Madagascar. Methods: We assessed herbaceous plants along a land‐use intensification gradient ranging from unburned land‐use types (i.e. old‐growth forest, forest fragment and forest‐derived vanilla agroforest) to burned land‐use types (i.e....

Larger pollinators deposit more pollen on stigmas across multiple plant species – a meta-analysis

Rita Földesi, Rita Földesi, Brad Howlett, Ingo Grass & Péter Batáry
Abstract 1. Many insect species provide essential pollination services. However, the amount of pollen deposited onto a stigma when visiting a flower (“single visit pollen deposition”, SVD) can vary greatly among taxa depending on morphological traits of pollinators. Further, SVD is commonly measured using one of two methods (‘static’: waiting for an insect to visit a flower present on plant, and ‘active’: removing the flower and presenting it to a flower visitor) that may also...

Data from: What’s in a colluvial deposit? New perspectives from archaeopedology.

Sascha Scherer, Katleen Deckers, Jan Dietel, Markus Fuchs, Jessica Henkner, Benjamin Höpfer, Andrea Junge, Ellen Kandeler, Eva Lehndorff, Peter Leinweber, Johanna Lomax, Jan Miera, Christian Poll, Michael Toffolo, Thomas Knopf, Thomas Scholten & Peter Kühn
Colluvial deposits are considered as sedimentary archives for the reconstruction of soil erosion history, Holocene climate, past pedogenesis and land use. However, the human contribution to the formation of colluvial deposits is mainly based on quantitative assumptions derived from the local chronostratigraphy and archaeology. For this reason, there is often a substantial gap in the qualitative identification of specific land use practices that caused prehistoric soil erosion. We use an archaeopedological multi-proxy approach on a...

Data from: Decreasing predation rates and shifting predator compositions along a land-use gradient in Madagascar’s vanilla landscapes

Dominik Schwab, Annemarie Wurz, Ingo Grass, Anjaharnony A.N.A. Rakotomalala, Kristina Osen, Marie Rolande Soazafy, Dominic A. Martin & Teja Tscharntke
1. Land-use change is the main driver of deforestation and land degradation resulting in the loss of biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in north-eastern Madagascar. Vanilla, the region’s main cash crop, is grown in agroforestry systems and may provide an opportunity for the conservation of biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. 2. We used dummy caterpillars to assess predation rates and predator communities along a land-use gradient including unburned old-growth and forest fragments, herbaceous and woody fallows after...

Carbohydrate depletion in roots impedes phosphorus nutrition of forest trees

Simon Clausing, Rodica Pena, Bin Song, Karolin Müller, Paula Mayer-Gruner, Sven Marhan, Martin Grafe, Stefanie Schulz, Jaane Krüger, Friederike Lang, Michael Schloter, Ellen Kandeler & Andrea Polle
The aim of the study was to determine the effect of belowground plant-derived carbohydrates on P uptake, P concentrations and enzymes activities related to P mobilization in roots, ectomycorrhizas and soil and on the abundances of P-related genes in soil bacteria. We report data from a girdling experiment in two temperate beech forest with contrasting soil phosphorus concentrations. We used soil cores and the fractions of the organic layer and mineral topsoil separately one and...

Data from: Spontaneous forest regrowth in South-West Europe: consequences for nature’s contributions to people

Irene Martín-Forés, Sandra Magro, Andres Bravo-Oviedo, Raquel Alfaro-Sánchez, Josep M. Espelta, Theresa Frei, Elena Valdés-Correcher, Carmen Rodríguez Fernández-Blanco, Georg Winkel, Gabriel Gerzabek, Arndt Hampe & Fernando Valladares
Context European forests are expanding and becoming denser following the widespread abandonment of farmland and rural areas. Yet, little is known about the goods and services that spontaneous forest regrowth provide to people. Aims We assessed the changes in nature’s contributions to people (NCP) from spontaneous forest regrowth, i.e. forest expansion and densification, in South-West Europe. Methods We investigated 65 forest plots in four different landscapes with contrasting ecological and societal contexts. Two landscapes are...

Data from: The stronger, the better – trait hierarchy is driving alien species interaction

Viktoria Ferenc & Christine Sheppard
Multiple invaders commonly co-occur in native ecosystems and in some cases have been shown to facilitate each other thus exacerbating impacts on native species, while in other cases one invader may reduce the impact of another due to competition. We therefore aimed at identifying mechanisms driving alien species interactions. We conducted a common garden experiment investigating all pairwise combinations of 20 alien annual plant species in Germany. We first tested whether competition or facilitation occurred...

Data from: They like it cold, but only in winter: climate‐mediated effects on a hibernator

Joanna Fietz, Franz Langer & Wolfgang Schlund
Variations in ambient temperature (Ta) profoundly influence energy consumption in endotherms and therefore their survival and fitness. But depending on whether endotherms are hibernating or active, the same changes in Ta may have opposing consequences for their energy consumption. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate how variations in Ta, occurring during hibernation and during the active period of a hibernator, affect different fitness relevant traits. To understand whether changes in Ta impact...

Registration Year

  • 2020
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Resource Types

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Affiliations

  • University of Hohenheim
    16
  • University of Göttingen
    5
  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    2
  • University of Bayreuth
    2
  • University of Antananarivo
    2
  • University of Tübingen
    2
  • National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment
    1
  • University of Wuppertal
    1
  • University of Vic
    1
  • University of Adelaide
    1