258 Works

Data from: Spatial and spatiotemporal variation in metapopulation structure affects population dynamics in a passively dispersing arthropod

Annelies De Roissart, Shaopeng Wang & Dries Bonte
1. The spatial and temporal variation in the availability of suitable habitat within metapopulations determines colonization–extinction events, regulates local population sizes and eventually affects local population and metapopulation stability. Insights into the impact of such a spatiotemporal variation on the local population and metapopulation dynamics are principally derived from classical metapopulation theory and have not been experimentally validated. 2. By manipulating spatial structure in artificial metapopulations of the spider mite Tetranychus urticae, we test to...

Data from: The genomes of two key bumblebee species with primitive eusocial organisation

Ben M. Sadd, Seth M. Barribeau, Guy Bloch, Dirk C. De Graaf, Peter Dearden, Christine Elsik, Jurgen Gadau, Cornelius Grimmelikhuijzen, Martin Hasselmann, Jeffrey Lozier, Hugh Robertson, Guy Smagghe, Eckart Stolle, Matthias Van Vaerenbergh, Robert Waterhouse, Erich Bornberg-Bauer, Steffan Klasberg, Anna Bennett, Francisco Camara, Roderic Guigo, Katharina Hoff, Marco Mariotti, Monica Munos-Torres, Terence Murphy, Didac Santesmasses … & Kim C. Worley
Background: The shift from solitary to social behavior is one of the major evolutionary transitions. Primitively eusocial bumblebees are uniquely placed to illuminate the evolution of highly eusocial insect societies. Bumblebees are also invaluable natural and agricultural pollinators, and there is widespread concern over recent population declines in some species. High-quality genomic data will inform key aspects of bumblebee biology, including susceptibility to implicated population viability threats. Results: We report the high quality draft genome...

Data from: Post-fragmentation population structure in a cooperative breeding Afrotropical cloud forest bird: emergence of a source-sink population network

Martin Husemann, Laurence Cousseau, Tom Callens, Erik Matthysen, Carl Vangestel, Caspar Hallmann & Luc Lens
The impact of demographic parameters on the genetic population structure and viability of organisms is a long-standing issue in the study of fragmented populations. Demographic and genetic tools are now readily available to estimate census and effective population sizes and migration and gene flow rates with increasing precision. Here we analysed the demography and genetic population structure over a recent 15-year time span in five remnant populations of Cabanis's greenbul (Phyllastrephus cabanisi), a cooperative breeding...

Data from: Molecular variability and genetic structure of Chrysodeixis includens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), an important soybean defoliator in Brazil

Janine Palma, Kevin Maebe, Jerson Vanderlei Carús Guedes & Guy Smagghe
This study provides the first genetic characterization of the soybean looper, Chrysodeixis includens (Walker, 1857), an important defoliating pest species of soybean crops in Brazil. Population genetic variability and the genetic structure of C. includens populations were evaluated by using ISSR markers with samples from the major soybean producing regions in Brazil in the growing seasons 2011/2012. Seven different primers were applied for population characterization of the molecular variability and genetic structure of 8 soybean...

Data from: Evolutionary history of a dispersal-associated locus across sympatric and allopatric divergent populations of a wing-polymorphic beetle across Atlantic Europe

Steven M. Van Belleghem, Dick Roelofs & Frederik Hendrickx
Studying the evolutionary history of trait divergence, in particular those related to dispersal capacity, is of major interest for the process of local adaptation and metapopulation dynamics. Here, we reconstruct the evolution of different alleles at the nuclear encoded mitochondrial NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (mtIdh) locus of the ground beetle Pogonus chalceus that are differentially and repeatedly selected in short- and long-winged populations in response to different hydrological regimes at both allopatric and sympatric scales along...

Data from: Prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia in intensive care units: an international online survey

Marie-Laurence Lambert, Mercedes Palomar, Antonella Agodi, Michael Hiesmayr, Alain Lepape, Anne Ingenbleek, Eduardo Palencia Herrejon, Stijn Blot & Uwe Frank
Background: On average 7% of patients admitted to intensive-care units (ICUs) suffer from a potentially preventable ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Our objective was to survey attitudes and practices of ICUs doctors in the field of VAP prevention. Methods: A questionnaire was made available online in 6 languages from April, 1st to September 1st, 2012 and disseminated through international and national ICU societies. We investigated reported practices as regards (1) established clinical guidelines for VAP prevention, and...

Data from: The role of cognitive and affective empathy in spouses' support interactions: an observational study

Lesley L. Verhofstadt, Inge Devoldre, Ann Buysse, Michael Stevens, Celine Hinnekens, William Ickes & Mark Davis
The present study examined how support providers’ empathic dispositions (dispositional perspective taking, empathic concern, and personal distress) as well as their situational empathic reactions (interaction-based perspective taking, empathic concern, and personal distress) relate to the provision of spousal support during observed support interactions. Forty-five committed couples provided questionnaire data and participated in two ten-minute social support interactions designed to assess behaviors when partners are offering and soliciting social support. A video-review task was used to...

Data from: Biodiversity as insurance for sapling survival in experimental tree plantations

Thomas Van De Peer, Kris Verheyen, Lander Baeten, Quentin Ponette & Bart Muys
Biodiversity can insure ecosystems against declines in their functioning by increasing the mean level of ecosystem processes and decreasing the spatial or temporal variance of these processes. On this basis, mixing tree species is expected to be an effective management strategy to reduce the risk of planting failure in young plantations. We examined the effects of biodiversity insurance on sapling survival in three tree diversity experiments across Belgium. Based on the survival scoring of 89...

Data from: Serendipitous meta-transcriptomics: the fungal community of Norway spruce (Picea abies)

Nicolas Delhomme, Görel Sundström, Neda Zamani, Henrik Lantz, Yao-Cheng Lin, Torgeir R. Hvidsten, Marc P. Höppner, Patric Jern, Yves Van De Peer, Joakim Lundeberg, Manfred G. Grabherr & Nathaniel R. Street
After performing de novo transcript assembly of >1 billion RNA-Sequencing reads obtained from 22 samples of different Norway spruce (Picea abies) tissues that were not surface sterilized, we found that assembled sequences captured a mix of plant, lichen, and fungal transcripts. The latter were likely expressed by endophytic and epiphytic symbionts, indicating that these organisms were present, alive, and metabolically active. Here, we show that these serendipitously sequenced transcripts need not be considered merely as...

Data from: Light accelerates plant responses to warming

Pieter De Frenne, Francisco Rodríguez-Sánchez, An De Schrijver, David A. Coomes, Martin Hermy, Pieter Vangansbeke & Kris Verheyen
Competition for light has profound effects on plant performance in virtually all terrestrial ecosystems. Nowhere is this more evident than in forests, where trees create environmental heterogeneity that shapes the dynamics of forest-floor communities1,​2,​3. Observational evidence suggests that biotic responses to both anthropogenic global warming and nitrogen pollution may be attenuated by the shading effects of trees and shrubs4,​5,​6,​7,​8,​9. Here we show experimentally that tree shade is slowing down changes in below-canopy communities due to...

Data from: Selection for costly sexual traits results in a vacant mating niche and male dimorphism

Frederik Hendrickx, Bram Vanthournout & Michael Taborsky
The expected strong directional selection for traits that increase a male's mating ability conflicts with the frequent observation that within species, males may show extreme variation in sexual traits. These male reproductive polymorphisms are usually attributed to direct male-male competition. It is currently unclear, however, how directional selection for sexually selected traits may convert into disruptive selection, and if female preference for elaborate traits may be an alternative mechanism driving the evolution of male polymorphism....

Data from: Into and out of the tropics: global diversification patterns in a hyper-diverse clade of ectomycorrhizal fungi

Brian P. Looney, Martin Ryberg, Felix Hampe, Marisol Sánchez-García & P. Brandon Matheny
Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, symbiotic mutualists of many dominant tree and shrub species, exhibit a biogeographic pattern counter to the established latitudinal diversity gradient of most macroflora and fauna. However, an evolutionary basis for this pattern has not been explicitly tested in a diverse lineage. In this study, we reconstructed a mega-phylogeny of a cosmopolitan and hyper-diverse genus of ECM fungi, Russula, sampling from annotated collections and utilizing publically available sequences deposited in GenBank. Metadata from...

Data from: The evolution of eggshell cuticle in relation to nesting ecology

Liliana D'Alba, Rafael Maia, Mark E. Hauber & Matthew D. Shawkey
Avian eggs are at risk of microbial infection prior to and during incubation. A large number of defence mechanisms have evolved in response to the severe costs imposed by these infections. The eggshell's cuticle is an important component of antimicrobial defence, and its role in preventing contamination by microorganisms in domestic chickens is well known. Nanometer-scale cuticular spheres that reduce microbial attachment and penetration have recently been identified on eggs of several wild avian species....

Data from: Species interactions increase the temporal stability of community productivity in Pinus sylvestris-Fagus sylvatica mixtures across Europe

Miren Del Río, Hans Pretzsch, Ricardo Ruiz-Peinado, Evy Ampoorter, Peter Annighöfer, Ignacio Barbeito, Kamil Bielak, Gediminas Brazaitis, Lluis Coll, Lars össler, Marek Fabrika, David I. Forrester, Michael Heym, Václav Hurt, Viktor Kurylyak, Magnus Löf, Fabio Lombardi, Ekaterina Makrickiene, Bratislav Matovic, Frits Mohren, Renzo Motta, Jan Den Ouden, Maciej Pach, Quentin Ponette, Gerhard Schütze … & Lars Drössler
1.There is increasing evidence that species diversity enhances the temporal stability of community productivity in different ecosystems, although its effect at population and tree levels seems to be negative or neutral. Asynchrony in species responses to environmental conditions was found to be one of the main drivers of this stabilizing process. However, the effect of species mixing on the stability of productivity, and the relative importance of the associated mechanisms, remain poorly understood in forest...

Data from: EuMIXFOR empirical forest mensuration and ring width data from pure and mixed stands of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) through Europe

Michael Heym, Ricardo Ruíz-Peinado, Miren Del Río, Kamil Bielak, David I. Forrester, Gerald Dirnberger, Ignacio Barbeito, Gediminas Brazaitis, Indrė Ruškytė, Lluís Coll, Marek Fabrika, Lars Drössler, Magnus Löf, Hubert Sterba, Václav Hurt, Viktor Kurylak, Fabio Lombardi, Dejan Stojanović, Jan Den Ouden, Renzo Motta, Maciej Pach, Jerzy Skrzyszewski, Quentin Ponette, Géraud De Streel, Vit Sramek … & Hans Pretzsch
This data set provides unique empirical data from triplets of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) across Europe. Dendrometric variables are provided for 32 triplets, 96 plots, 7555 trees and 4695 core samples. These data contribute to our understanding of mixed stand dynamics.

Data from: Fitness costs of key point mutations that underlie acaricide target-site resistance in the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae

Sabina Bajda, Maria Riga, Nicky Wybouw, Stavrini Papadaki, Eleni Ouranou, Seyedeh Masoumeh Fotoukkiaii, John Vontas & Thomas Van Leeuwen
The frequency of insecticide/acaricide target-site resistance is increasing in arthropod pest populations and is typically underpinned by single point mutations that affect the binding strength between the insecticide/acaricide and its target-site. Theory predicts that although resistance mutations clearly have advantageous effects under the selection pressure of the insecticide/acaricide, they might convey negative pleiotropic effects on other aspects of fitness. If such fitness costs are in place, target-site resistance is thus likely to disappear in the...

Data from: Temporal changes in genetic variability in three bumblebee species from Rio Grande do Sul, South Brazil

Kevin Maebe, Laura Golsteyn, Patrícia Nunes-Silva, Betina Blochtein & Guy Smagghe
Microsatellite_GenAlEX_datafileThis datafile includes the microsatellite genetic data in GenALEx format used in the paperDryad_Apidologie.xlsx

Data from: Assessing the dynamics of natural populations by fitting individual based models with approximate Bayesian computation

Jukka Sirén, Luc Lens, Laurence Cousseau & Otso Ovaskainen
1. Individual based models (IBMs) allow realistic and flexible modelling of ecological systems, but their parametrization with empirical data is statistically and computationally challenging. Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) has been proposed as an efficient approach for inference with IBMs, but its applicability to data on natural populations has not been yet fully explored. 2. We construct an IBM for the metapopulation dynamics of a species inhabiting a fragmented patch network, and develop an ABC method...

Data from: Sharing the burden: on the division of parental care and vocalizations during incubation

Marwa M. Kavelaars, Luc Lens & Wendt Müller
In species with biparental care, individuals only have to pay the costs for their own parental investment, while the contribution of their partner comes for free. Each parent hence benefits if its partner works harder, creating an evolutionary conflict of interest. How parents resolve this conflict and how they achieve the optimal division of parental tasks often remains elusive. In this study, we investigated whether lesser black-backed gulls (Larus fuscus) divide parental care during incubation...

Data from: Long-term recovery of the functional community assembly and carbon pools in an African tropical forest succession

Marijn Bauters, Oscar Vercleyen, Bernard Vanlauwe, Johan Six, Bernard Bonyoma, Henri Badjoko, Wannes Hubau, Alison Hoyt, Mathieu Boudin, Hans Verbeeck & Pascal Boeckx.
On the African continent, the population is expected to expand fourfold in the next century, which will increasingly impact the global carbon cycle and biodiversity conservation. Therefore, it is of vital importance to understand how carbon stocks and community assembly recover after slash-and-burn events in tropical second-growth forests. We inventoried a chronosequence of 15 1-hectare plots in lowland tropical forest of the central Congo Basin and evaluated changes in aboveground and soil organic carbon stocks...

Optimal foraging explains novel movement behavior of benthic diatoms

Wen-Si Hu, Ming-Ji Huang, H.P. Zhang, Feng Zhang, Wim Vyverman & Quan-Xing Liu
Adaptive locomotion of living organisms contributes to their competitive abilities and helps maintain their fitness in diverse environments. To date, however, our understanding of searching behavior and its ultimate cause remains poorly understood in ecology and biology. Here, we investigate motion patterns of biofilm-inhabiting marine raphid diatom Navicula arenaria var. rostellata in two-dimensional space. We report that individual Navicula cells display a “circular-run-and-reversal” movement behavior at different concentrations of dissolved silicic acid (dSi). We show...

Mechanisms for color convergence in a mimetic radiation of poison frogs

Evan Twomey, Morgan Kain, Myriam Claeys, Kyle Summers, Santiago Castroviejo-Fisher & Ines Van Bocxlaer
In animals, bright colors often evolve to mimic other species when a resemblance is selectively favored. Understanding the proximate mechanisms underlying such color mimicry can give insights into how mimicry evolves, for example, whether color convergence evolves from a shared set of mechanisms or through the evolution of novel color production mechanisms. We studied color production mechanisms in poison frogs (Dendrobatidae), focusing on the mimicry complex of Ranitomeya imitator. Using reflectance spectrometry, skin pigment analysis,...

The neglected impact of tracking devices on terrestrial arthropods

Femke Batsleer, Dries Bonte, Daan Dekeukeleire, Steven Goossens, Ward Poelmans, Eliane Van Der Cruyssen, Dirk Maes & Martijn L. Vandegehuchte
Tracking devices have become small enough to be widely applied to arthropods to study their movement. However, possible side effects of these devices on arthropod performance and behaviour are rarely considered. We performed a systematic review of 173 papers about research in which tracking devices –Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), harmonic radar, and radio telemetry tags– were attached to terrestrial arthropods. The impact of such tags was quantified in only 12% of the papers, while in...

Data from: High ecosystem service delivery potential of small woodlands in agricultural landscapes

Alicia Valdés, Jonathan Lenoir, Pieter De Frenne, Emilie Andrieu, Jorg Brunet, Olivier Chabrerie, Sara Cousins, Marc Deconchat, Pallieter De Smedt, Martin Diekmann, Steffen Ehrmann, Emilie Gallet-Moron, Stefanie Gaertner, Brice Giffard, Karin Hansen, Martin Hermy, Annette Kolb, Vincent Leroux, Jaan Liira, Jessica Lindgren, Ludmilla Martin, Tobias Naaf, Taavi Paal, Willem Proesmans, Michael Scherer-Lorenzen … & Guillaume Decocq
Global forest loss and fragmentation have strongly increased the frequency of forest patches smaller than a few hectares. Little is known about the biodiversity and ecosystem service supply potential of such small woodlands in comparison to larger forests. As it is widely recognized that high biodiversity levels increase ecosystem functionality and the delivery of multiple ecosystem services, small, isolated woodlands are expected to have a lower potential for ecosystem service delivery than large forests hosting...

Global biogeography and diversification of a group of brown seaweeds (Phaeophyceae) driven by clade-specific evolutionary processes

Christophe Vieira, Frederique Steen, Sofie D'hondt, Quinten Bafort, Cindy Fernandez-García, Brian Wysor, Lennert Tyberghein, Ana Tronholm, Lydiane Mattio, Claude Payri, Gary Saunders, Frederik Leliaert, Heroen Verbruggen & Olivier De Clerck
Aim: Historical processes that shaped current diversity patterns of seaweeds remain poorly understood. Using Dictyotales, a globally distributed order of brown seaweeds as a model, we test if historical biogeographical and diversification patterns are comparable across clades. Dictyotales contain some 22 genera, three of which, Dictyota, Lobophora and Padina, are exceptionally diverse. Specifically we test if the evolutionary processes in these clades that shaped their latitudinal diversity patterns are in line with the tropical conservatism,...

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