24 Works

Data from: Contributions of feather microstructure to eider down insulation properties

Liliana D'Alba, Thomas Holm Carlsen, Árni Ásgeirsson, Matthew D. Shawkey & Jon Einar Jonsson
Insulation is an essential component of nest structure that helps provide incubation requirements for birds. Many species of waterfowl breed in high latitudes where rapid heat loss can necessitate a high energetic input from parents and use down feathers to line their nests. Common eider Somateria mollissima nest down has exceptional insulating properties but the microstructural mechanisms behind the feather properties have not been thoroughly examined. Here, we hypothesized that insulating properties of nest down...

Data from: Kinematics of chisel-tooth digging by African mole-rats

Sam Van Wassenbergh, Stef Heindryckx & Dominique Adriaens
Mole-rats are known to use their protruding, chisel-like incisors to dig underground networks of tunnels, but it remains unknown how these incisors are used to break and displace the soil. Theoretically, different excavation strategies can be used. Mole-rats could either use their head depressor muscles to power scooping motions of the upper incisors (by nose-down head rotations) or the lower incisors (by nose-up head rotations), or their jaw adductors to grab and break the soil...

Data from: A prioritised list of invasive alien species to assist the effective implementation of EU legislation

Carles Carboneras, Piero Genovesi, Montserrat Vila, Tim Blackburn, Martina Carrete, Miguel Clavero, Bram D'hondt, Jorge F. Orueta, Belinda Gallardo, Pedro Geraldes, Pablo González-Moreno, Richard D. Gregory, Wolfgang Nentwig, Jean-Yves Paquet, Petr Pysek, Wolfgang Rabitsch, Iván Ramírez, Riccardo Scalera, Jose Tella, Paul Walton, Robin Wynde & Tim M. Blackburn
1. Effective prevention and control of invasive species generally relies on a comprehensive, coherent and representative list of species that enables resources to be used optimally. European Union (EU) Regulation 1143/2014 on invasive alien species (IAS) aims to control or eradicate priority species, and to manage pathways to prevent the introduction and establishment of new IAS; it applies to species considered of Union concern and subject to formal risk assessment. So far, 49 species have...

Data from: Mammalian herbivores affect leafhoppers associated with specific plant functional types at different timescales

Martijn L. Vandegehuchte, Valeria Trivellone, Martin Schütz, Jennifer Firn, Frederic De Schaetzen & Anita C. Risch
1. Theory predicts that mammalian herbivores affect the quantity and quality of plants on which they preferentially feed in the short term. In the longer term, they can promote either preferred or less preferred plants, depending on whether preferred plants are adapted or sensitive to grazing. Less clear are the short- and long-term responses of herbivorous insects to mammalian herbivory, and how these responses depend on the specific plants or plant functional types on which...

Data from: microCT-based phenomics in the zebrafish skeleton reveals virtues of deep phenotyping in a distributed organ system

Matthew Hur, Charlotte A. Gistelinck, Philippe Huber, Jane Lee, Marjorie H. Thompson, Adrian T. Monstad-Rios, Claire J. Watson, Sarah K. McMenamin, Andy Willaert, David M. Parichy, Paul Coucke & Ronald Y. Kwon
Phenomics, which ideally involves in-depth phenotyping at the whole-organism scale, may enhance our functional understanding of genetic variation. Here, we demonstrate methods to profile hundreds of phenotypic measures comprised of morphological and densitometric traits at a large number of sites within the axial skeleton of adult zebrafish. We show the potential for vertebral patterns to confer heightened sensitivity, with similar specificity, in discriminating mutant populations compared to analyzing individual vertebrae in isolation. We identify phenotypes...

Data from: Covert deformed wing virus infections have long-term deleterious effects on honeybee foraging and survival

Kristof Benaets, Anneleen Van Geystelen, Dries Cardoen, Lina De Smet, Dirk C. De Graaf, Liliane Schoofs, Maarten H.D. Larmuseau, Laura E. Brettell, Stephen J. Martin, Tom Wenseleers & Maarten H. D. Larmuseau
Several studies have suggested that covert stressors can contribute to bee colony declines. Here we provide a novel case study and show using radiofrequency identification tracking technology that covert deformed wing virus (DWV) infections in adult honeybee workers seriously impact long-term foraging and survival under natural foraging conditions. In particular, our experiments show that adult workers injected with low doses of DWV experienced increased mortality rates, that DWV caused workers to start foraging at a...

Data from: Overyielding in young tree plantations is driven by local complementarity and selection effects related to shade tolerance

Thomas Van De Peer, Kris Verheyen, Quentin Ponette, Nuri Nurlaila Setiawan & Bart Muys
1. Overyielding in mixed-species forests has been demonstrated in a vast body of literature, and the focus of functional biodiversity research is now shifting towards a mechanistic understanding of these observations. 2. We explored diversity-productivity relationships (DPRs) at two sites of a large-scale tree diversity experiment, with benign (Zed) and harsh (Ged) environmental conditions for plantation establishment. Additive partitioning methodologies were adopted to detect phenomenological patterns in the productivity data, and the trait structure of...

Data from: Socio-demographic, social-cognitive, health-related and physical environmental variables associated with context-specific sitting time in Belgian adolescents: a one-year follow-up study

Cedric Busschaert, Nicola D. Ridgers, Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij, Greet Cardon, Jelle Van Cauwenberg & Katrien De Cocker
Introduction: More knowledge is warranted about multilevel ecological variables associated with context-specific sitting time among adolescents. The present study explored cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of ecological domains of sedentary behaviour, including socio-demographic, social-cognitive, health-related and physical-environmental variables with sitting during TV viewing, computer use, electronic gaming and motorized transport among adolescents. Methods: For this longitudinal study, a sample of Belgian adolescents completed questionnaires at school on context-specific sitting time and associated ecological variables. At baseline,...

Data from: Restoration of native mangrove wetlands can reverse diet shifts of benthic macrofauna caused by invasive cordgrass

Jianxiang Feng, Qian Huang, Hui Chen, Jiemin Guo & Guanghui Lin
1. Ecological replacement using native mangrove species combined with physical treatments has become an effective method in controling the spread of invasive Spartina alterniflora. To re-establish ecosystem functions, trophic interactions between macrofauna and their potential food resources must be considered during the restoration process. 2. Here we examined the changes in the diets of macrofauna in three restored mangrove ecosystems with different invasion histories following the removal of S. alterniflora in southern China. Carbon and...

Data from: Isotopic methods for non-destructive assessment of carbon dynamics in shrublands under long-term climate change manipulation

Louise C. Andresen, Maria T. Dominguez, Sabine Reinsch, Andy R. Smith, Inger Kappel Schmidt, Per Ambus, Claus Beier, Pascal Boeckx, Roland Bol, Giovanbattista De Dato, Bridget A. Emmett, Marc Estiarte, Mark H. Garnett, György Kröel-Dulay, Sharon L. Mason, Cecilie S. Nielsen, Josep Penuelas, Albert Tietema & Andrew R. Smith
1.Long-term climate change experiments are extremely valuable for studying ecosystem responses to environmental change. Examination of the vegetation and the soil should be non-destructive to guarantee long-term research. In this paper, we review field methods using isotope techniques for assessing carbon dynamics in the plant-soil-air continuum, based on recent field experience and examples from a European climate change manipulation network. 2.Eight European semi-natural shrubland ecosystems were exposed to warming and drought manipulations. One field site...

Data from: A genome for gnetophytes and early evolution of seed plants

Tao Wan, Zhi-Ming Liu, Ling-Fei Li, Andrew R. Leitch, Ilia J. Leitch, Rolf Lohaus, Zhong-Jian Liu, Hai-Ping Xin, Yan-Bing Gong, Yang Liu, Wen-Cai Wang, Ling-Yun Chen, Yong Yang, Laura J. Kelly, Ji Yang, Jin-Ling Huang, Zhen Li, Ping Liu, Li Zhang, Hong-Mei Liu, Hui Wang, Shu-Han Deng, Meng Liu, Ji Li, Lu Ma … & Xiao-Ming Wang
Gnetophytes are an enigmatic gymnosperm lineage comprising three genera, Gnetum, Welwitschia and Ephedra, which are morphologically distinct from all other seed plants. Their distinctiveness has triggered much debate as to their origin, evolution and phylogenetic placement among seed plants. To increase our understanding of the evolution of gnetophytes, and their relation to other seed plants, we report here a high-quality draft genome sequence for Gnetum montanum, the first for any gnetophyte. By using a novel...

Data from: Decision making for mitigating wildlife diseases: from theory to practice for an emerging fungal pathogen of amphibians

Stefano Canessa, Claudio Bozzuto, Evan H. Campbell Grant, Sam S. Cruickshank, Matthew C. Fisher, Jacob C. Koella, Stefan Lötters, An Martel, Frank Pasmans, Benjamin C. Scheele, Annemarieke Spitzen-Van Der Sluijs, Sebastian Steinfartz, Benedikt R. Schmidt & Ben C. Scheele
1.Conservation science can be most effective in its decision-support role when seeking answers to clearly formulated questions of direct management relevance. Emerging wildlife diseases, a driver of global biodiversity loss, illustrate the challenges of performing this role: in spite of considerable research, successful disease mitigation is uncommon. Decision analysis is increasingly advocated to guide mitigation planning, but its application remains rare. 2.Using an integral projection model, we explored potential mitigation actions for avoiding population declines...

Data from: Influence of device accuracy and choice of algorithm for species distribution modelling of seabirds: a case study using black-browed albatrosses

Petra Quillfeldt, Jan O. Engler, Janet R. D. Silk, Richard A. Phillips & Janet R.D. Silk
Species distribution models (SDM) based on tracking data from different devices are used increasingly to explain and predict seabird distributions. However, different tracking methods provide different data resolutions, ranging from < 10m to >100km. To better understand the implications of this variation, we modeled the potential distribution of black-browed albatrosses Thalassarche melanophris from South Georgia that were simultaneously equipped with a Platform Terminal Transmitter (PTT) (high resolution) and a Global Location Sensor (GLS) logger (coarse...

Data from: Fragile coexistence of a global chytrid pathogen with amphibian populations is mediated by environment and demography

Annemarieke Spitzen-Van Der Sluijs, Stefano Canessa, A. Martel & Frank Pasmans
Unravelling the multiple interacting drivers of host pathogen co-existence is crucial in understanding how an apparently stable state of endemism may shift towards an epidemic and lead to biodiversity loss. Here, we investigate the apparent co-existence of the global amphibian pathogen *Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis* (Bd) with *Bombina variegata* populations in the Netherlands over a seven-year period. We used a multi-season mark-recapture data set and assessed potential drivers of co-existence (individual condition, environmental mediation and demographic compensation)...

Data from: How tree species identity and diversity affect light transmittance to the understory in mature temperate forests

Bram K. Sercu, Lander Baeten, Frieke Van Coillie, An Martel, Luc Lens, Kris Verheyen & Dries Bonte
Light is a key resource for plant growth and is of particular importance in forest ecosystems, because of the strong vertical structure leading to successive light interception from canopy to forest floor. Tree species differ in the quantity and heterogeneity of light they transmit. We expect decreases in both the quantity and spatial heterogeneity of light transmittance in mixed stands relative to monocultures, due to complementarity effects and niche filling. 2. We tested the degree...

Data from: EuMIXFOR empirical forest mensuration and ring width data from pure and mixed stands of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) through Europe

Michael Heym, Ricardo Ruíz-Peinado, Miren Del Río, Kamil Bielak, David I. Forrester, Gerald Dirnberger, Ignacio Barbeito, Gediminas Brazaitis, Indrė Ruškytė, Lluís Coll, Marek Fabrika, Lars Drössler, Magnus Löf, Hubert Sterba, Václav Hurt, Viktor Kurylak, Fabio Lombardi, Dejan Stojanović, Jan Den Ouden, Renzo Motta, Maciej Pach, Jerzy Skrzyszewski, Quentin Ponette, Géraud De Streel, Vit Sramek … & Hans Pretzsch
This data set provides unique empirical data from triplets of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) across Europe. Dendrometric variables are provided for 32 triplets, 96 plots, 7555 trees and 4695 core samples. These data contribute to our understanding of mixed stand dynamics.

Data from: Assessing the dynamics of natural populations by fitting individual based models with approximate Bayesian computation

Jukka Sirén, Luc Lens, Laurence Cousseau & Otso Ovaskainen
1. Individual based models (IBMs) allow realistic and flexible modelling of ecological systems, but their parametrization with empirical data is statistically and computationally challenging. Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) has been proposed as an efficient approach for inference with IBMs, but its applicability to data on natural populations has not been yet fully explored. 2. We construct an IBM for the metapopulation dynamics of a species inhabiting a fragmented patch network, and develop an ABC method...

Data from: Mammal-induced trophic cascades in invertebrate food webs are modulated by grazing intensity in subalpine grassland

Martijn L. Vandegehuchte, Martin Schütz, Frederic De Schaetzen & Anita C. Risch
1. Even though mammalian herbivores can exert strong indirect effects on other animals by altering the vegetation, the study of trophic cascades retains a focus on apex predators and their top-down forces. Bottom-up trophic interaction chains induced by mammalian herbivores, particularly in invertebrate food webs, remain largely unexplored. 2. We tested whether effects of mammalian herbivores on the vegetation ricochet back up several trophic levels of the invertebrate food web. We further tested two alternative...

Data from: Integrative taxonomy of root-knot nematodes reveals multiple independent origins of mitotic parthenogenesis

Toon Janssen, Gerrit Karssen, Olivera Topalović, Danny Coyne & Wim Bert
During sampling of several Coffea arabica plantations in Tanzania severe root galling, caused by a root-knot nematode was observed. From pure cultures, morphology and morphometrics of juveniles and females matched perfectly with Meloidogyne africana, whereas morphology of the males matched identically with those of Meloidogyne decalineata. Based on their Cox1 sequence, however, the recovered juveniles, females and males were confirmed to belong to the same species, creating a taxonomic conundrum. Adding further to this puzzle,...

Data from: Great spotted cuckoo nestlings have no antipredatory effect on magpie or carrion crow host nests in southern Spain

Manuel Soler, Liesbeth De Neve, María Roldán, Tomás Pérez-Contreras & Juan J. Soler
Host defences against cuckoo parasitism and cuckoo trickeries to overcome them are a classic example of antagonistic coevolution. Recently it has been reported that this relationship may turn to be mutualistic in the case of the carrion crow (Corvus corone) and its brood parasite, the great spotted cuckoo (Clamator glandarius), given that experimentally and naturally parasitized nests were depredated at a lower rate than non-parasitized nests. This result was interpreted as a consequence of the...

Data from: Different response-effect trait relationships underlie contrasting responses to two chemical stressors

Christoph Mensens, Frederik De Leander, Colin Janssen, Koen Sabbe, Marleen De Troch & Colin R. Janssen
1. Trait-based approaches predict ecosystem functioning under environmental change by relating traits predicting changes in species densities (response traits) to traits driving ecosystem functioning (effect traits). Stressors can however affect ecosystem functioning not only by altering species densities, but also by directly changing species effect traits. 2. We first identified the response traits predicting the cell density of 18 marine benthic diatom strains along gradients of two chemical stressors (a pesticide and a metal, atrazine...

Data from: Habitat specialization and climate affect arthropod fitness: a comparison of generalist vs. specialist spider species in Arctic and temperate biomes

Camille Ameline, Charlène Puzin, Joseph J. Bowden, Kevin Lambeets, Philippe Vernon & Julien Pétillon
Life history trade-offs are a key notion in evolutionary biology, notably for understanding how selection shapes the diversity of traits among species. Despite the frequent study of such trade-offs, few studies synchronously investigate the effects of multiple factors, such as niche specialization and adaptation to harsh environments. We compared reproduction (fecundity and egg quality) in two sympatric couples (one habitat generalist and one specialist) of congeneric wolf spider species, in both Arctic and temperate habitats....

Data from: Interspecific competition counteracts negative effects of dispersal on adaptation of an arthropod herbivore to a new host

Adriana Alzate Vallejo, Karen Bisschop, Rampal S. Etienne, Dries Bonte & A. Alzate
Dispersal and competition have both been suggested to drive variation in adaptability to a new environment, either positively or negatively. A simultaneous experimental test of both mechanisms is however lacking. Here, we experimentally investigate how population dynamics and local adaptation to a new host plant in a model species, the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae), are affected by dispersal from a stock population (no-adapted) and competition with an already adapted spider mite species (Tetranychus evansi)....

Data from: Cooperative breeding shapes post-fledging survival in an Afrotropical forest bird

Dries Van De Loock, Diederik Strubbe, Liesbeth De Neve, Mwangi Githiru, Erik Matthysen & Luc Lens
While avian group living typically accrues multiple benefits, it is yet unknown how these benefits manifest post- fledging. Here, by using an indirect radio- telemetry approach, we found that cooperation increases fledgling survival in an Afrotropical forest bird. This result indicates the importance of considering the full breeding cycle in cooperative breeding research, which may ultimately lead to a better understanding of evolutionary drivers of cooperation.

Registration Year

  • 2017
    24

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    24

Affiliations

  • Ghent University
    24
  • Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research
    3
  • Vrije Universiteit Brussel
    2
  • Institute of Environmental Engineering
    2
  • University of Göttingen
    2
  • Université Catholique de Louvain
    2
  • Spanish National Research Council
    2
  • University College London
    2
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    2
  • Henan University
    1