556 Works

Host Factor Experiment (SM001-P)

&
Purpose: To look at the host response to different doses across 4 time points after infection. Samples were collected for both transcriptomics and proteomics.General Design: 20 week-old C57Bl6 mice; ThreeDoses = 1E2, 1E3,1E4 and 1E5 (PFU); Time points of 1, 2, 4 and 7 days; ~5 mice/time point for infections; 3 mice/timepoint for time matched mocks

Host Factor Experiment (SM019-R)

&
Purpose: To obtain lung samples from Tnfrsf1b knock out mutant mice infected with SARS MA15 virus for transcriptional analyses. Details: Time Points = days 4 and 7 post-infection; 2-3 replicate mice for each condition; Inoculation medium for mock infection was the same as the medium used for virus infection. Infection dose was 10^5 pfu.

Host Factor Experiment (IM007-R)

&
Purpose: To obtain lung samples from C57BL6 mice infected with Vietnam/1203-CIP048_RG4/2004 (H5N1) for both transcriptional and proteomic analyses. Details: Time Points = 1, 2, 4 and 7 days post infection; 5 replicates for infected mice and triplicate mice for the mocks; Inoculation medium for mock infection was the same as the medium used for virus infection. Infection dose was 10^3 and 10^4 PFU.

Host Factor Experiment (IM001-P)

&
Purpose: To look at the host response to different doses across 4 time points after infection. Samples were collected for both transcriptomics and proteomics.General Design: 20 week-old C57Bl6 mice; ThreeDoses = 1E2, 1E3, & 1E4 (PFU); Time points of 1, 2, 4 and 7 days; ~5 mice/time point for infections; 3 mice/timepoint for time matched mocks

Host Factor Experiment (SM012-R)

&
Purpose: To obtain lung samples from C57BL6 mice infected with SARS MA15 and deltaORF6 mutant viruses for transcriptional analysis. Details: Time Points = 1, 2, 4 and 7 days post infection; 2-3 replicates for infected and mock mice; Inoculation medium for mock infection was the same as the medium used for virus infection. Infection dose was 10^5 pfu.

Host Factor Experiment (SCL008-P)

&
Purpose: To obtain samples for transcriptional and proteomic analysis using wild type icSARS CoV and icSARS ExoNI and icSARS dNSP16 mutants in 2B-4 cells/sorted Calu-3 cells with high ACE2 expression. Details: Time Points = 0, 7, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60 and 72h post infection (Note: only 0, 24, 48 and 72hr samples analysed for proteomics); Done in triplicate for RNA and quadruplicate for protein; Replicates are defined as 3 or 4 different wells, plated...

Host Factor Experiment (IM009-R)

&
Purpose: To obtain lung samples from C57BL6 mice infected with A/CA/04/2009 (H1N1) or, mouse-adapted A/CA/04/2009 (H1N1) virus for transcriptional analysis. Details: Time Points = 1, 3 and 5 days post-infection; 2-3 replicates for infected and mock mice; Inoculation medium for mock infection was the same as the medium used for virus infection. Infection dose was 10^6 pfu.

Host Factor Experiment (SCL005-R)

&
Purpose: To obtain samples for transcriptional and proteomic analysis using wild type and icSARS delta ORF6 virus in 2B-4 cells/sorted Calu-3 cells with high ACE2 expression. Details: Time Points = 0, 3, 7, 12, 24, 30, 36, 48, 54, 60 and 72h post infection; Done in triplicate for both RNA and protein; Triplicates are defined as 3 different wells, plated at the same time using the same cell stock for all replicates; Time matched mocks...

HadCM3 and HadGEM3 LIG model outputs: A sea ice-free Arctic

Maria Vittoria Guarino & Louise Sime
The HadGEM3 (HadGEM3-GC3.1 or HadGEM3-GC3.1-N96ORCA1) PI simulation was initialized using the standard CMIP6 protocol using constant 1850 GHGs, ozone, solar, tropospheric aerosol, stratospheric volcanic aerosol and land-use forcing. The PI spin-up was 700 model-years, which allowed the land and oceanic masses to attain approximate steady state. The HadGEM3 LIG (Last Interglacial) simulation was initialized from the end of the spin-up phase of the equivalent pre-industrial (PI) simulation. After initialization, the LIG was run for 350...

Deer GPS and animal-borne camera data showing effects of gray wolves on niche overlap between mule and white-tailed deer in eastern Washington state

Aaron Wirsing
Predators may alter niche overlap between prey species by eliciting divergent anti-predator behavior. Accordingly, we exploited heterogeneous gray wolf (Canis lupus) presence in Washington, USA, to contrast patterns of resource and dietary overlap between mule (Odocoileus hemionus) and white-tailed deer (O. virginianus) at sites with and without resident packs. Mule deer run (stot) in a way that is less effective as a means of fleeing from predators than the galloping gait of white-tailed deer. Consequently,...

Data from: Intrinsic and extrinsic drivers of source-sink dynamics

Julie A. Heinrichs, Joshua L. Lawler & Nathan H. Schumaker
Many factors affect the presence and exchange of individuals among subpopulations and influence not only the emergence, but the strength of ensuing source–sink dynamics within metapopulations. Yet their relative contributions remain largely unexplored. To help identify the characteristics of empirical systems that are likely to exhibit strong versus weak source–sink dynamics and inform their differential management, we compared the relative roles of influential factors in strengthening source–sink dynamics. In a series of controlled experiments within...

Data from: Population structure and phylogeography of the Gentoo Penguin (Pygoscelis papua) across the Scotia Arc

Hila Levy, Gemma V. Clucas, Alex D. Rogers, Adam D. Leaché, Kate L. Ciborowski, Michael J. Polito, Heather J. Lynch, Michael J. Dunn & Tom Hart
Climate change, fisheries pressure on penguin prey, and direct human disturbance of wildlife have all been implicated in causing large shifts in the abundance and distribution of penguins in the Southern Ocean. Without mark-recapture studies, understanding how colonies form and, by extension, how ranges shift is challenging. Genetic studies, particularly focused on newly established colonies, provide a snapshot of colonisation and can reveal the extent to which shifts in abundance and occupancy result from changes...

Data from: Relative importance of abiotic, biotic, and disturbance drivers of plant community structure in the sagebrush steppe

Rachel M. Mitchell, Jonathan D. Bakker, John B. Vincent & G. Matt Davies
Abiotic conditions, biotic factors, and disturbances can act as filters that control community structure and composition. Understanding the relative importance of these drivers would allow us to understand and predict the causes and consequences of changes in community structure. We used long-term data (1989-2002) from the sagebrush steppe in Washington state, USA, to ask three questions: 1) What are the key drivers of community-level metrics of community structure? 2) Do community-level metrics and functional groups...

Data from: Heat tolerance is more variable than cold tolerance across species of Iberian lizards after controlling for intraspecific variation

Salvador Herrando-Pérez, Camila Monasterio, Wouter Beukema, Verónica Gomes, Francisco Gomes Ferri-Yáñez, Josabel Belliure, Steven L. Chown, Lauren B Buckley, David R. Vieites & Miguel B. Araújo
The widespread observation that heat tolerance is less variable than cold tolerance (‘cold-tolerance asymmetry’) leads to the prediction that species exposed to temperatures near their thermal maxima should have reduced evolutionary potential for adapting to climate warming. However, the prediction is largely supported by species-level global studies based on single estimates of both physiological metrics per taxon. We ask if cold-tolerance asymmetry holds for Iberian lizards after accounting for intraspecific variation in critical thermal maxima...

Data from: Variation in growth and developmental responses to supraoptimal temperatures near latitudinal range limits of gypsy moth Lymantria dispar (L.), an expanding invasive species

Lily M. Thompson, Trevor M. Faske, Nana Banahene, Dominique Grim, Salvatore J. Agosta, Dylan Parry, Patrick C. Tobin, Derek M. Johnson & Kristine L. Grayson
Variation in thermal performance within and between populations provides the potential for adaptive responses to increasing temperatures associated with climate change. Organisms experiencing temperatures above their optimum on a thermal performance curve exhibit rapid declines in function and these supraoptimal temperatures can be a critical physiological component of range limits. The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.) (Lepidoptera: Erebidae), is one of the best-documented biological invasions and factors driving its spatial spread are of significant ecological...

Data from: Urban nectarivorous bird communities in Cape Town, South Africa, are structured by ecological generalisation and resource distribution

Anina Coetzee, Phoebe Barnard & Anton Pauw
Biological communities are increasingly faced with novel urban habitats and their response may depend on a combination of biological and habitat traits. The response of pollinator species to urban habitats are of particular importance because all species involved in the pollination mutualism may be affected. Nectarivorous bird communities worldwide show varying tolerances to urban areas, but studies from Africa are lacking. We investigated nectarivorous bird communities in a medium-sized South African city and asked which...

Data from: Always chew your food: freshwater stingrays use mastication to process tough insect prey

Matthew A. Kolmann, Kenneth C. Welch, Adam P. Summers & Nathan R. Lovejoy
Chewing, characterized by shearing jaw motions and high-crowned molar teeth, is considered an evolutionary innovation that spurred dietary diversification and evolutionary radiation of mammals. Complex prey-processing behaviours have been thought to be lacking in fishes and other vertebrates, despite the fact that many of these animals feed on tough prey, like insects or even grasses. We investigated prey capture and processing in the insect-feeding freshwater stingray Potamotrygon motoro using high-speed videography. We find that Potamotrygon...

Data from: Population responses of common ravens to reintroduced gray wolves

Lauren E. Walker, John M. Marzluff, Matthew C. Metz, Aaron J. Wirsing, L. Monika Moskal, Daniel R. Stahler & Douglas W. Smith
1. Top predators have cascading effects throughout the food web but their impacts on scavenger abundance are largely unknown. Gray wolves (Canis lupus) provide carrion to a suite of scavenger species, including the common raven (Corvus corax). Ravens are wide-ranging and intelligent omnivores that commonly take advantage of anthropogenic food resources. In areas where they overlap with wolves, however, ravens are numerous and ubiquitous scavengers of wolf-acquired carrion. 2. We aimed to determine whether subsidies...

Data from: A new species of horned lizard (genus Phrynosoma) from Guerrero, México, with an updated multilocus phylogeny

Adrián Nieto-Montes De Oca, Diego Arenas-Moreno, Elizabeth Beltrán-Sánchez & Adam D. Leaché
We describe a new species of Phrynosoma from central northeastern Guerrero, México; perform a phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial and nuclear sequence data to estimate its phylogenetic relationships; and investigate the monophyly of Phrynosoma asio, P. braconnieri, and P. taurus. The new species can be distinguished from all of its congeners by the possession of a unique combination of morphological characteristics. The molecular genetic data include three fragments of the mitochondrial genome and six nuclear genes...

Data from: New evidence for hybrid zones of forest and savanna elephants in Central and West Africa

Samrat Mondol, Ida Moltke, John Hart, Michael Keigwin, Lisa Brown, Matthew Stephens & Samuel K. Wasser
The African elephant consists of forest and savanna subspecies. Both subspecies are highly endangered due to severe poaching and habitat loss, and knowledge of their population structure is vital to their conservation. Previous studies have demonstrated marked genetic and morphological differences between forest and savanna elephants and despite extensive sampling, genetic evidence of hybridization between them has been restricted largely to a few hybrids in the Garamba region of northeastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC)....

Data from: Evolution and maintenance of haploid-diploid life cycles in natural populations: the case of the marine brown alga Ectocarpus

Lucía Couceiro, Mickael Le Gac, Heather M. Hunsperger, Stéphane Mauger, Christophe Destombe, J. Mark Cock, Sophia Ahmed, Susana M. Coelho, Myriam Valero & Akira F. Peters
The evolutionary stability of haploid-diploid life cycles is still controversial. Mathematical models indicate that niche differences between ploidy phases may be a necessary condition for the evolution and maintenance of these life cycles. Nevertheless, experimental support for this prediction remains elusive. In the present work, we explored this hypothesis in natural populations of the brown alga Ectocarpus. Consistent with the life cycle described in culture, E. crouaniorum in NW France and E. siliculosus in SW...

Data from: Bacterial endosymbiont infections in ‘living fossils’: a case study of North American vaejovid scorpions

& Robert W. Bryson
Bacterial endosymbionts are common among arthropods, and maternally inherited forms can affect the reproductive and behavioural traits of their arthropod hosts. The prevalence of bacterial endosymbionts and their role in scorpion evolution have rarely been investigated. In this study, 61 samples from 40 species of scorpion in the family Vaejovidae were screened for the presence of the bacterial endosymbionts Cardinium, Rickettsia, Spiroplasma and Wolbachia. No samples were infected by these bacteria. However, one primer pair...

Data from: Geomagnetic field influences upward movement of young Chinook salmon emerging from nests

Nathan F. Putman, Michelle M. Scanlan, Amanda M. Pollock, Joseph P. O'Neil, Ryan B. Couture, Joseph S. Stoner, Thomas P. Quinn, Kenneth J. Lohmann, David L.G. Noakes & David L. G. Noakes
Organisms use a variety of environmental cues to orient their movements in three-dimensional space. Here, we show that the upward movement of young Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) emerging from gravel nests is influenced by the geomagnetic field. Fish in the ambient geomagnetic field travelled farther upwards through substrate than did fish tested in a field with the vertical component inverted. This suggests that the magnetic field is one of several factors that influences emergence from...

Data from: Modelling tooth–prey interactions in sharks: the importance of dynamic testing

Katherine A. Corn, Stacy C. Farina, Jeffrey Brash & Adam P. Summers
The shape of shark teeth varies among species, but traditional testing protocols have revealed no predictive relationship between shark tooth morphology and performance. We developed a dynamic testing device to quantify cutting performance of teeth. We mimicked head-shaking behaviour in feeding large sharks by attaching teeth to the blade of a reciprocating power saw fixed in a custom-built frame. We tested three tooth types at biologically relevant speeds and found differences in tooth cutting ability...

Data from: A comparison of individual-based genetic distance metrics for landscape genetics

Andrew J. Shirk, Erin L. Landguth & Samuel A. Cushman
A major aim of landscape genetics is to understand how landscapes resist gene flow and thereby influence population genetic structure. An empirical understanding of this process provides a wealth of information that can be used to guide conservation and management of species in fragmented landscapes, and also to predict how landscape change may affect population viability. Statistical approaches to infer the true model among competing alternatives are based on the strength of the relationship between...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    5
  • 2021
    77
  • 2020
    126
  • 2019
    35
  • 2018
    67
  • 2017
    58
  • 2016
    54
  • 2015
    53
  • 2014
    24
  • 2013
    32

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    556

Affiliations

  • University of Washington
    556
  • Oregon State University
    18
  • Stanford University
    16
  • University of California, Berkeley
    16
  • University of British Columbia
    13
  • University of Montana
    10
  • University of Minnesota
    10
  • Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture
    9
  • Cornell University
    9
  • Northwest Fisheries Science Center
    9