58 Works

Data from: A comparison of individual-based genetic distance metrics for landscape genetics

Andrew J. Shirk, Erin L. Landguth & Samuel A. Cushman
A major aim of landscape genetics is to understand how landscapes resist gene flow and thereby influence population genetic structure. An empirical understanding of this process provides a wealth of information that can be used to guide conservation and management of species in fragmented landscapes, and also to predict how landscape change may affect population viability. Statistical approaches to infer the true model among competing alternatives are based on the strength of the relationship between...

Data from: Body temperature distributions of active diurnal lizards in three deserts: skewed up or skewed down?

Raymond B. Huey & Eric R. Pianka
1. The performance of ectotherms integrated over time depends in part on the position and shape of the distribution of body temperatures (Tb) experienced during activity. For several complementary reasons, physiological ecologists have long expected that Tb distributions during activity should have a long left tail (left-skewed); but only infrequently have they quantified the magnitude and direction of Tb skewness in nature. 2. To evaluate whether left-skewed Tb distributions are general for diurnal desert lizards,...

Data from: Epigenetic memory via concordant DNA methylation is inversely correlated to developmental potential of mammalian cells

Minseung Choi, Diane P. Genereux, Jamie Goodson, Haneen Al-Azzawi, Shannon Q. Allain, Noah Simon, Stan Palasek, Carol B. Ware, Chris Cavanaugh, Daniel G. Miller, Winslow C. Johnson, Kevin D. Sinclair, Reinhard Stöger & Charles D. Laird
In storing and transmitting epigenetic information, organisms must balance the need to maintain information about past conditions with the capacity to respond to information in their current and future environments. Some of this information is encoded by DNA methylation, which can be transmitted with variable fidelity from parent to daughter strand. High fidelity confers strong pattern matching between the strands of individual DNA molecules and thus pattern stability over rounds of DNA replication; lower fidelity...

Data from: Identification of genomic regions associated with sex in Pacific halibut

Daniel P. Drinan, Timothy Loher & Lorenz Hauser
Understanding and identifying the genetic mechanisms responsible for sex-determination are important for species management, particularly in exploited fishes where sex biased harvest could have implications on population dynamics and long-term persistence. The Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) supports important fisheries in the North Pacific Ocean. The proportion of each sex in the annual harvest is currently estimated using growth curves, but genetic techniques may provide a more accurate method. We used restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) sequencing...

Data from: Temperature-dependent body size effects determine population responses to climate warming

Max Lindmark, Magnus Huss, Jan Ohlberger & Anna Gårdmark
Current understanding of animal population responses to rising temperatures is based on the assumption that biological rates such as metabolism, which governs fundamental ecological processes, scale independently with body size and temperature, despite empirical evidence for interactive effects. Here we investigate the consequences of interactive temperature- and size-scaling of vital rates for the dynamics of populations experiencing warming using a stage-structured consumer-resource model. We show that interactive scaling alters population and stage-specific responses to rising...

Data from: Taxonomic and functional assessment of mesopredator diversity across an estuarine habitat mosaic

Collin Gross, Cinde Donoghue, Casey Pruitt, Alan C. Trimble & Jennifer L. Ruesink
A long-standing rule in ecology is that structural complexity increases abundance and diversity of organisms, but this paradigm glosses over potential trait-specific benefits of habitat structure across different regional species pools. We tested this idea using multiple response variables emphasizing taxonomic and functional diversity in seagrass-vegetated, edge, and unvegetated habitats across three estuaries in Washington State (USA). We also used these variables in tandem to evaluate functional redundancy as a proxy for ecosystem resistance and...

Data from: Invasive seaweeds transform habitat structure and increase biodiversity of associated species

Jennifer A. Dijkstra, Larry G. Harris, Kristen Mello, Amber Littere, Christopher Wells, Colin Ware & Amber Litterer
The visual landscape of marine and terrestrial systems is changing as a result of anthropogenic factors. Often these shifts involve introduced species that are morphologically dissimilar to native species, creating a unique biogenic structure and habitat for associated species within the landscape. While community level changes as a result of introduced species have been documented in both terrestrial and marine systems, it is still unclear how long-term shifts in species composition will affect habitat complexity...

Data for allometric equations of Chrysolepis sempervirens, Cornus sericea, Corylus cornuta ssp. californica, and Leucothoe davisiae.

James A. Lutz, J. A. Freund, A. J. Larson, M. E. Swanson, T. J. Furniss, K. M. L. Becker, E. M. Blomdahl, C. A. Cansier, S. J. Germain & S. M. A. Jeronimo
This data set includes measurements of 40 stems of Chrysolepis sempervirens (Kellogg) Hjelmq. (bush chinquapin), 41 stems of Cornus sericea L. (redosier dogwood), 50 stems of Corylus cornuta Marsh. ssp. californica (A. DC.) E. Murray, and 40 stems of Leucothoe davisiae Torrey (Sierra laurel), as reported in Lutz et al. (2014, 2017). Nomenclature follows Flora of North America (1993+).

Data from: 2D or Not 2D? Testing the utility of 2D vs. 3D landmark data in geometric morphometrics of the sculpin subfamily Oligocottinae (Pisces; Cottoidea)

Thaddaeus J. Buser, Brian L. Sidlauskas & Adam P. Summers
We contrast 2D vs. 3D landmark‐based geometric morphometrics in the fish subfamily Oligocottinae by using 3D landmarks from CT‐generated models and comparing the morphospace of the 3D landmarks to one based on 2D landmarks from images. The 2D and 3D shape variables capture common patterns across taxa, such that the pairwise Procrustes distances among taxa correspond and the trends captured by principal component analysis are similar in the xy plane. We use the two sets...

Data from: Screening of duplicated loci reveals hidden divergence patterns in a complex salmonid genome

Morten T. Limborg, Wesley A. Larson, Lisa W. Seeb & James E. Seeb
A whole-genome duplication (WGD) doubles the entire genomic content of a species and is thought to have catalysed adaptive radiation in some polyploid-origin lineages. However, little is known about general consequences of a WGD because gene duplicates (i.e., paralogs) are commonly filtered in genomic studies; such filtering may remove substantial portions of the genome in data sets from polyploid-origin species. We demonstrate a new method that enables genome-wide scans for signatures of selection at both...

Data from: A phylogenomic perspective on the biogeography of skinks in the Plestiodon brevirostris group inferred from target enrichment of ultraconserved elements

, Charles W. Linkem, Carlos J. Pavón-Vázquez, Adrián Nieto-Montes De Oca, John Klicka, John E. McCormack & Robert W. Bryson
Aim: The aim of our study was to reconstruct ancestral geographic distributions from time-calibrated phylogenies generated from phylogenomic data to answer three broad questions about the biogeography of skinks in the Plestiodon brevirostris group: (1) Are biogeographic patterns correlated with the formation of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt? (2) Do different methods of phylogenetic estimation result in different topologies? If so, (3) are biogeographic reconstructions impacted by the use of different phylogenetic trees? Location: Mexico. Methods:...

Data from: Contrasting genetic metrics and patterns among naturalized rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in two Patagonian lakes differentially impacted by trout aquaculture

Cristian B. Canales-Aguirre, Lisa W. Seeb, James E. Seeb, Maria I. Cadiz, Selim S. Musleh, Ivan Arismendi, Gonzalo Gajardo, Ricardo Galleguillos & Daniel Gomez-Uchida
Different pathways of propagation and dispersal of non-native species into new environments may have contrasting demographic and genetic impacts on established populations. Repeated introductions of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to Chile in South America, initially through stocking and later through aquaculture escapes, provide a unique setting to contrast these two pathways. Using a panel of single nucleotide polymorphisms, we found contrasting genetic metrics and patterns among naturalized trout in Lake Llanquihue, Chile’s largest producer of...

Data from: The oceanic biological pump: rapid carbon transfer to depth at continental margins during winter

Laurenz Thomsen, Jacopo Aguzzi, Corrado Costa, Fabio De Leo, Andrea Ogston & Autun Purser
The oceanic biological pump is responsible for the important transfer of CO2-C as POC “Particulate Organic Carbon” to the deep sea. It plays a decisive role in the Earth’s carbon cycle and significant effort is spent to quantify its strength. In this study we used synchronized daily time-series data of surface chlorophyll-a concentrations from the NASA’s MODIS satellite in combination with hourly to daily observations from sea surface buoys and from an Internet Operated Vehicle...

Data from: A major shift in diversification rate helps explain macroevolutionary patterns in primate species diversity

Jessica H. Arbour & Sharlene E. Santana
Primates represent one of the most species rich, wide ranging and ecologically diverse clades of mammals. What major macroevolutionary factors have driven their diversification and contributed to the modern distribution of primate species remains widely debated. We employed phylogenetic comparative methods to examine the role of clade age and evolutionary rate heterogeneity in the modern distribution of species diversity of Primates. Primate diversification has accelerated since its origin, with decreased extinction leading to a shift...

Data from: Morphological and functional maturity of the oral jaws covary with offspring size in Trinidadian guppies

Terry R. Dial, Luz Patricia Hernandez & Elizabeth L. Brainerd
Large size of individual offspring is routinely selected for in highly competitive environments, such as in low-predation populations of the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata). Large guppy offspring outcompete their smaller conspecifics, but the functional mechanisms underlying this advantage are unknown. We measured jaw kinematics during benthic feeding and cranial musculoskeletal morphologies in neonates and juveniles from five populations of Trinidadian guppy and found that both kinematics and morphologies vary substantially with neonatal size. Rotation at...

Data from: Individual marking of soft-bodied subtidal invertebrates in situ - a novel staining technique applied to the giant plumose anemone Metridium farcimen (Tilesius, 1809)

Christopher D. Wells & Kenneth P. Sebens
The ability to recognize individuals and track growth over time is crucial to population dynamics research as well as studies of animal behavior. Invertebrates are particularly difficult to track as they often molt, have regenerative capabilities, or lack hard parts to attach markers. We tested, in laboratory and field studies, a new way of marking sea anemones (order Actiniaria) by injection of three vital stains (i.e., neutral red, methylene blue, and fluorescein). Neutral red and...

Data from: Microbiome sharing between children, livestock and household surfaces in western Kenya

Emily Mosites, Matt Sammons, Elkanah Otiang, Alexander Eng, Ceclia Noecher, Ohad Manor, Sarah Hilton, Samuel M. Thmbi, Clayton Onyango, Gemina Garland-Lewis, Douglas R. Call, M. Kariuki Njenga, Judith N. Wasserheit, Jennifer A. Zambriski, Judd L. Walson, Guy H. Palmer, Joel Montgomery, Elhanan Borenstein, Richard Omore, Peter M. Rabinowitz, Samuel M. Thumbi & Cecilia Noecker
The gut microbiome community structure and development are associated with several health outcomes in young children. To determine the household influences of gut microbiome structure, we assessed microbial sharing within households in western Kenya by sequencing 16S rRNA libraries of fecal samples from children and cattle, cloacal swabs from chickens, and swabs of household surfaces. Among the 156 households studied, children within the same household significantly shared their gut microbiome with each other, although we...

Data from: Compensatory mutations improve general permissiveness to antibiotic resistance plasmids

Wesley Loftie-Eaton, Kelsie Bashford, Hannah Quinn, Kieran Dong, Jack Millstein, Samuel Hunter, Maureen K. Thomason, Houra Merrikh, Jose M. Ponciano & Eva M. Top
Horizontal gene transfer mediated by broad-host-range plasmids is an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance spread. While not all bacteria maintain plasmids equally well, plasmid persistence can improve over time, yet no general evolutionary mechanisms have emerged. Our goal was to identify these mechanisms, and to assess if adaptation to one plasmid affects the permissiveness to others. We experimentally evolved Pseudomonas sp. H2 containing multi-drug resistance plasmid RP4, determined plasmid persistence and cost using a joint...

Data from: Clearing muddied waters: capture of environmental DNA from turbid waters

Kelly E. Williams, Antoinette J. Piaggio & Kathryn P. Huyvaert
Understanding the differences in efficiencies of various methods to concentrate, extract, and amplify environmental DNA (eDNA) is vital for best performance of eDNA detection. Aquatic systems vary in characteristics such as turbidity, eDNA concentration, and inhibitor load, thus affecting eDNA capture efficiency. Application of eDNA techniques to the detection of terrestrial invasive or endangered species may require sampling at intermittent water sources that are used for drinking and cooling; these water bodies may often be...

Data from: Species discrimination of co-occurring small fossil mammals: a case study of the Cretaceous-Paleogene multituberculate genus Mesodma

Stephanie M. Smith & Gregory P. Wilson
The mammalian fossil record is largely composed of isolated teeth and tooth-bearing elements. In vertebrate microfossil assemblages with closely related, co-occurring species of mammals, it can be difficult to identify isolated teeth to species level because morphological differences among species may be slight and based on a single tooth position. Here we investigate the utility of the allegedly diagnostic lower fourth premolar (p4) for species-level identification in the genus Mesodma (Multituberculata, Neoplagiaulacidae). We conducted linear...

Data from: High human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence in South African adolescents and young women encourages expanded HPV vaccination campaigns

Zizipho Z.A. Mbulawa, Cari Van Schalkwyk, Nai-Chung Hu, Tracy L. Meiring, Shaun Barnabas, Smritee Dabee, Heather Jaspan, Jean-MAri Kriek, Shameem Z. Jaumdally, Etienne Muller, Linda-Gail Bekker, David A. Lewis, Janan Dietrich, Glenda Gray, Jo-Ann S. Passmore, Anna-Lise Williamson & Zizipho Z. A. Mbulawa
Objectives: To investigate prevalence of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes to inform HPV vaccination strategy in South Africa and to study factors associated with HPV prevalence. Methods: Sexually active, HIV-negative women, aged 16-22 years recruited from Soweto (n=143) and Cape Town (n=148) were tested for cervical HPV and other genital infections. Results: Overall HPV prevalence was 66.7% (194/291) in young women. Cape Town women were more likely to have multiple HPV infections than the Soweto...

Data from: Graphics for relatedness research

Iván Galván-Femenía, Jan Graffelman & Carles Barceló-I-Vidal
Studies of relatedness have been crucial in molecular ecology over the last decades. Good evidence of this is the fact that studies of population structure, evolution of social behaviours, genetic diversity and quantitative genetics all involve relatedness research. The main aim of this article is to review the most common graphical methods used in allele sharing studies for detecting and identifying family relationships. Both IBS and IBD based allele sharing studies are considered. Furthermore, we...

Data from: Specialized specialists and the narrow niche fallacy: a tale of scale-feeding fishes

Matthew A. Kolmann, Jonathan M. Huie, Kory Evans & Adam P. Summers
Although rare within the context of 30,000 species of extant fishes, scale-feeding as an ecological strategy has evolved repeatedly across the teleost tree of life. Scale-feeding (lepidophagous) fishes are diverse in terms of their ecology, behavior, and specialized morphologies for grazing on scales and mucus of sympatric species. Despite this diversity, the underlying ontogenetic changes in functional and biomechanical properties of associated feeding morphologies in lepidophagous fishes are less understood. We examined the ontogeny of...

Data from: The function and organization of the motor system controlling flight maneuvers in flies

Theodore H. Lindsay, Anne Sustar, Michael H. Dickinson, Theodore Lindsay & Michael Dickinson
Animals face the daunting task of controlling their limbs using a small set of highly constrained actuators. This problem is particularly demanding for insects such as Drosophila, which must adjust wing motion for both quick voluntary maneuvers and slow compensatory reflexes using only a dozen pairs of muscles. To identify strategies by which animals execute precise actions using sparse motor networks, we imaged the activity of a complete ensemble of wing control muscles in intact,...

Data from: Caenorhabditis elegans genes affecting interindividual variation in life-span biomarker gene expression

Alexander Mendenhall, Matthew M. Crane, Patricia M. Tedesco, Thomas E. Johnson & Roger Brent
Genetically identical organisms grown in homogenous environments differ in quantitative phenotypes. Differences in one such trait, expression of a single biomarker gene, can identify isogenic cells or organisms that later manifest different fates. For example, in isogenic populations of young adult Caenorhabditis elegans, differences in Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) expressed from the hsp-16.2 promoter predict differences in life span. Thus, it is of interest to determine how interindividual differences in biomarker gene expression arise. Prior...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    58

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    58

Affiliations

  • University of Washington
    58
  • University of Montana
    4
  • Oregon State University
    3
  • University of California, Berkeley
    3
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    3
  • Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
    2
  • Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture
    2
  • Occidental College
    2
  • University of Colorado Boulder
    2
  • University of the Witwatersrand
    2