67 Works

Data from: Multi-allelic exact tests for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium that account for gender

Jan Graffelman & Bruce S. Weir
Statistical tests for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium are important elementary tools in genetic data analysis. X-chromosomal variants have long been tested by applying autosomal test procedures to females only, and gender is usually not considered when testing autosomal variants for equilibrium. Recently, we proposed specific X-chromosomal exact test procedures for bi-allelic variants that include the hemizygous males, as well as autosomal tests that consider gender. In this paper we present the extension of the previous work for...

Data from: Social and ecological drivers of reproductive seasonality in geladas

Elizabeth Tinsley Johnson, Noah Snyder-Mackler, Amy Lu, Thore J. Bergman & Jacinta C. Beehner
Many non-seasonally breeding mammals demonstrate some degree of synchrony in births, which is generally associated with ecological factors that mediate fecundity. However, disruptive social events, such as alpha male replacements, also have the potential to affect the timing of female reproduction. Here, we examined reproductive seasonality in a wild population of geladas (Theropithecus gelada) living at high altitudes in an afro-alpine ecosystem in Ethiopia. Using 9 years of demographic data (2006-2014) we determined that, while...

Data from: Within-species patterns challenge our understanding of the Leaf Economics Spectrum

Leander D.L. Anderegg, Logan T. Berner, Grayson Badgley, Meera L. Sethi, Beverly E. Law, Janneke HilleRisLambers & Leander D. L. Anderegg
The utility of plant functional traits for predictive ecology relies on our ability to interpret trait variation across multiple taxonomic and ecological scales. Using extensive datasets of trait variation within species, across species, and across communities, we analyzed whether and at what scales ‘leaf economics spectrum’ (LES) traits show predicted trait-trait covariation. We found that most variation in LES traits is often, but not universally, at high taxonomic levels (between families, between genera in a...

Data from: Impact of confinement housing on study end-points in the calf model of cryptosporidiosis

Geneva Graef, Natalie J. Hurst, Lance Kidder, Tracy L. Sy, Laura B. Goodman, Whitney D. Preston, Samuel L. M. Arnold & Jennifer A. Zambriski
Background: Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death in children < 5 years globally and the parasite genus Cryptosporidium is a leading cause of that diarrhea. The global disease burden attributable to cryptosporidiosis is substantial and the only approved chemotherapeutic, nitazoxanide, has poor efficacy in HIV positive children. Chemotherapeutic development is dependent on the calf model of cryptosporidiosis, which is the best approximation of human disease. However, the model is not consistently applied across...

Data from: Extreme diversity in the songs of Spitsbergen’s bowhead whales

Kathleen M. Stafford, Christian Lydersen, Oystein Wiig & Kit M. Kovacs
Almost all mammals communicate using sound, but few species produce complex songs. Two baleen whales sing complex songs that change annually, though only the humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) has received much research attention. This study focuses on the other baleen whale singer, the bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus). Members of the Spitsbergen bowhead whale population produced 184 different song types over a 3-year period, based on duty-cycled recordings from a site in Fram Strait in the...

Data from: Alaskan brown bears (Ursus arctos) aggregate and display fidelity to foraging neighborhoods while preying on Pacific salmon along small streams

Aaron J. Wirsing, Thomas P. Quinn, Curry J. Cunningham, Jennifer R. Adams, Apryle D. Craig & Lisette P. Waits
The interaction between brown bears (Ursus arctos) and Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) is important to the population dynamics of both species and a celebrated example of consumer-mediated nutrient transport. Yet, much of the site-specific information we have about the bears in this relationship comes from observations at a few highly visible but unrepresentative locations and a small number of radio-telemetry studies. Consequently, our understanding of brown bear abundance and behavior at more cryptic locations where...

Data from: Abundance of an economically important nematode parasite increased in Puget Sound between 1930 and 2016: evidence from museum specimens confirms historical data

Ingrid Howard, Ellie Davis, Gregory Lippert, Thomas P. Quinn & Chelsea L. Wood
1. Does disturbance increase or decrease parasite transmission among wildlife hosts? Ecologists cannot answer this controversial question, in part because few historical datasets rigorously document parasite abundance. Without such a baseline, it is difficult to determine whether contemporary ecosystems are experiencing elevated parasite burdens. 2. Here, we investigate change over time in the abundance of a parasite that affects the economic value of a fish species. Clavinema mariae is a nematode parasite of benthic fishes...

Data from: Increase in crop losses to insect pests in a warming climate

Curtis A. Deutsch, Joshua J. Tewksbury, Michelle Tigchelaar, David S. Battisti, Scott C. Merrill, Raymond B. Huey & Rosamond L. Naylor
Insect pests substantially reduce yields of three staple grains—rice, maize, and wheat—but models assessing the agricultural impacts of global warming rarely consider crop losses to insects. We use established relationships between temperature and the population growth and metabolic rates of insects to estimate how and where climate warming will augment losses of rice, maize, and wheat to insects. Global yield losses of these grains are projected to increase by 10 to 25% per degree of...

Data from: The spectre of too many species

Adam D. Leache, Tianqi Zhu, Bruce Rannala & Ziheng Yang
Recent simulation studies examining the performance of Bayesian species delimitation as implemented in the BPP program have suggested that BPP may detect population splits but not species divergences and that it tends to over-split when data of many loci are analyzed. Here we confirm these results and provide the mathematical justifications. We point out that the distinction between population and species splits made in the protracted speciation model has no influence on the generation of...

Data from: Dental ontogeny in extinct synapsids reveals a complex evolutionary history of the mammalian tooth attachment system

Aaron R.H. LeBlanc, Kirstin S. Brink, Megan R. Whitney, Fernando Abdala, Robert R. Reisz & Aaron R. H. LeBlanc
The mammalian dentition is uniquely characterized by a combination of precise occlusion, permanent adult teeth, and a unique tooth attachment system. Unlike the ankylosed teeth in most reptiles, mammal teeth are supported by a ligamentous tissue that suspends each tooth in its socket, providing flexible and compliant tooth attachment that prolongs the life of each tooth and maintains occlusal relationships. Here we investigate dental ontogeny through histological examination of a wide range of extinct synapsid...

Data from: Co-occurrence dynamics of endangered Lower Keys marsh rabbits and free-ranging domestic cats: prey responses to an exotic predator removal program

Michael V. Cove, Beth Gardner, Theodore R. Simons & Allan F. O'Connell
The Lower Keys marsh rabbit is one of many endangered endemic species of the Florida Keys. The main threats are habitat loss and fragmentation from sea level rise, development, and habitat succession. Exotic predators such as free-ranging domestic cats pose an additional threat to these endangered small mammals. Management strategies have focused on habitat restoration and exotic predator control. However, the effectiveness of predator removal and the effects of anthropogenic habitat modifications and restoration have...

Data from: Climate change, wildfire, and vegetation shifts in a high-inertia forest landscape: Western Washington, U.S.A.

Joshua S. Halofsky, David R. Conklin, Daniel C. Donato, Jessica E. Halofsky & John B. Kim
Future vegetation shifts under changing climate are uncertain for forests with infrequent stand-replacing disturbance regimes. These high-inertia forests may have long persistence even with climate change because disturbance-free periods can span centuries, broad-scale regeneration opportunities are fewer relative to frequent-fire systems, and mature tree species are long-lived with relatively high tolerance for sub-optimal growing conditions. Here, we used a combination of empirical and process-based modeling approaches to examine vegetation projections across high-inertia forests of Washington...

Data from: Genome-wide markers untangle the green-lizard radiation in the Aegean Sea and support a rare biogeographical pattern

Panagiotis Kornilios, Evanthia Thanou, Petros Lymberakis, Çetin Ilgaz, Yusuf Kumlutaş & Adam Leache
Aim: The Aegean Sea constitutes a major biogeographic barrier between the European and Asian continents and several models of diversification in the Aegean have been documented. Here we test three of those models for the Aegean green-lizards (Lacerta trilineata–pamphylica group): Vicariance vs. Overland Dispersal vs. Island Stepping-stone Dispersal. We investigate these hypotheses and complement our knowledge on the impact of the Aegean Barrier on east Mediterranean taxa. Location: Aegean Sea, east Mediterranean Taxon: Lacerta lizards...

Data from: The International Tree-Ring Data Bank (ITRDB) revisited: data availability and global ecological representativity

Shoudong Zhao, Neil Pederson, Loïc D'Orangeville, Janneke HilleRisLambers, Emery Boose, Caterina Penone, Bruce Bauer, Yuan Jiang & Rubén D. Manzanedo
Aim: The International Tree-Ring Data Bank (ITRDB) is the most comprehensive database of tree growth. To evaluate its usefulness and improve its accessibility to the broad scientific community, we aimed to: i) quantify its biases, ii) assess how well it represents global forests, iii) develop tools to identify priority areas to improve its representativity, and iv) make available the corrected database. Location: Worldwide. Time period: Contributed datasets between 1974 and 2017. Major taxa studied: Trees....

Data from: How to estimate kinship

Jerome Goudet, Tomas Kay & Bruce S. Weir
The concept of kinship permeates many domains of fundamental and applied biology ranging from social evolution to conservation science to quantitative and human genetics. Until recently, pedigrees were the gold standard to infer kinship, but the advent of next generation sequencing and the availability of dense genetic markers in many species make it a good time to (re) evaluate the usefulness of genetic markers in this context. Using three published data sets where both pedigrees...

Data from: Quantifying climate sensitivity and climate-driven change in North American amphibian communities

David A. W. Miller, Evan H. Campbell Grant, Erin Muths, Staci M. Amburgey, Michael J. Adams, Maxwell B. Joseph, J. Hardin Waddle, Pieter T. J. Johnson, Maureen E. Ryan, Benedikt R. Schmidt, Daniel L. Calhoun, Courtney L. Davis, Robert N. Fisher, David M. Green, Blake R. Hossack, Tracy A. G. Rittenhouse, Susan C. Walls, Larissa L. Bailey, Sam S. Cruickshank, Gary M. Fellers, Thomas A. Gorman, Carola A. Haas, Ward Hughson, David S. Pilliod, Steven J. Price … & Brent H. Sigafus
Changing climate will impact species’ ranges only when environmental variability directly impacts the demography of local populations. However, measurement of demographic responses to climate change has largely been limited to single species and locations. Here we show that amphibian communities are responsive to climatic variability, using >500,000 time-series observations for 81 species across 86 North American study areas. The effect of climate on local colonization and persistence probabilities varies among eco-regions and depends on local...

Data from: Quantifying the dark data in museum fossil collections as palaeontology undergoes a second digital revolution

Charles R. Marshall, Seth Finnegan, Erica C. Clites, Patricia A. Holroyd, Nicole Bonuso, Crystal Cortez, Edward Davis, Gregory P. Dietl, Patrick S. Druckenmiller, Ron C. Eng, Christine Garcia, Kathryn Estes-Smargiassi, Austin Hendy, Kathy A. Hollis, Holly Little, Elizabeth A. Nesbitt, Peter Roopnarine, Leslie Skibinski, Jann Vendetti & Lisa D. White
Large-scale analysis of the fossil record requires aggregation of palaeontological data from individual fossil localities. Prior to computers these synoptic datasets were compiled by hand, a laborious undertaking that took years of effort and forced palaeontologists to make difficult choices about what types of data to tabulate. The advent of desktop computers ushered in palaeontology’s first digital revolution – online literature-based databases, such as the Paleobiology Database (PBDB). However, the published literature represents only a...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    67

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    67

Affiliations

  • University of Washington
    67
  • Utah State University
    3
  • Duke University
    3
  • University of Minnesota
    3
  • University of California, Berkeley
    3
  • Alaska Fisheries Science Center
    3
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    3
  • McGill University
    3
  • University of Oslo
    3
  • Monash University
    3