3 Works

Data from: Plant mutualisms with rhizosphere microbiota in introduced versus native ranges

Natasha Shelby, Richard P. Duncan, Wim H. Van Der Putten, Kevin J. McGinn, Carolin Weser & Philip E. Hulme
The performance of introduced plants can be limited by the availability of soil mutualists outside their native range, but how interactions with mutualists differ between ranges is largely unknown. If mutualists are absent, incompatible or parasitic, plants may compensate by investing more in root biomass, adapting to be more selective or by maximizing the benefits associated with the mutualists available. We tested these hypotheses using seven non-agricultural species of Trifolium naturalized in New Zealand (NZ)....

Data from: Assessing patterns in introduction pathways of alien species by linking major invasion databases

Wolf-Christian Saul, Helen E. Roy, Olaf Booy, Lucilla Carnevali, Hsuan-Ju Chen, Piero Genovesi, Colin A. Harrower, Philip E. Hulme, Shyama Pagad, Jan Pergl & Jonathan M. Jeschke
1. Preventing the arrival of invasive alien species (IAS) is a major priority in managing biological invasions. However, information on introduction pathways is currently scattered across many databases that often use different categorisations to describe similar pathways. This hampers the identification and prioritisation of pathways in order to meet the main targets of recent environmental policies. 2. Therefore, we integrate pathway information from two major IAS databases, IUCN's Global Invasive Species Database (GISD) and the...

Data from: Predicting biotic interactions and their variability in a changing environment

Kohmei Kadowaki, Claire G. Barbera, William Godsoe, Frédéric Delsuc & Nicolas Mouquet
Global environmental change is altering the patterns of biodiversity worldwide. Observation and theory suggest that species' distributions and abundances depend on a suite of processes, notably abiotic filtering and biotic interactions, both of which are constrained by species' phylogenetic history. Models predicting species distribution have historically mostly considered abiotic filtering and are only starting to integrate biotic interaction. However, using information on present interactions to forecast the future of biodiversity supposes that biotic interactions will...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Lincoln University
    3
  • Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
    1
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    1
  • Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries
    1
  • Istituto Superiore per la Protezione e la Ricerca Ambientale
    1
  • Berlin Brandenburg Institute of Advanced Biodiversity Research
    1
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    1
  • Technical University Munich
    1
  • Kyoto University
    1
  • Animal and Plant Health Agency
    1