4 Works

Data from: Flight of the bumble bee: buzzes predict pollination services

Nicole E. Miller-Struttmann, David Heise, Johannes Schul, Jennifer C. Geib & Candace Galen
Multiple interacting factors drive recent declines in wild and managed bees, threatening their pollination services. Widespread and intensive monitoring could lead to more effective management of wild and managed bees. However, tracking their dynamic populations is costly. We tested the effectiveness of an inexpensive, noninvasive and passive acoustic survey technique for monitoring bumble bee behavior and pollination services. First, we assessed the relationship between the first harmonic of the flight buzz (characteristic frequency) and pollinator...

Data from: Priority effects are interactively regulated by top-down and bottom-up forces: evidence from wood decomposer communities

Devin R. Leopold, J. Paula Wilkie, Ian A. Dickie, Robert B. Allen, Peter K. Buchanan & Tadashi Fukami
Both top-down (grazing) and bottom-up (resource availability) forces can determine the strength of priority effects, or the effects of species arrival history on the structure and function of ecological communities, but their combined influences remain unresolved. To test for such influences, we assembled experimental communities of wood-decomposing fungi using a factorial manipulation of fungivore (Folsomia candida) presence, nitrogen availability, and fungal assembly history. We found interactive effects of all three factors on fungal species composition...

Data from: Sleeping with the ‘enemy’ - Hybridization of an endangered tree weta

Rachel A. Van Heugten, Roddy J. Hale, Mike H. Bowie & Marie L. Hale
While hybridization is an important part of the evolutionary process, for rare species mating with more common species hybridization can increase the risks of extinction. By mating with heterospecifics rare species waste valuable reproductive resources and as a result population sizes may decline. If introgression occurs, the rare species can become genetically swamped by alleles from the more common species, rendering it effectively extinct. As a consequence of these risks, hybridization with the more common...

Data from: Testing weed risk assessment paradigms: intraspecific differences in performance and naturalisation risk outweigh interspecific differences in alien Brassica

Ross Meffin, Richard P. Duncan & Philip E. Hulme
1.Risk assessments of alien species are usually conducted at species level, assuming that all individuals of a given species pose similar risks. However, this may not be the case if there is substantial within-species variation that could influence invasion success. 2.We used a seed addition experiment, comprising 25 taxonomically stratified varieties of three Brassica species introduced to roadside habitats in Canterbury, New Zealand, to quantify variation in performance among species, subspecies and varieties. We aimed...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • Lincoln University
    4
  • University of Canterbury
    2
  • Stanford University
    1
  • Webster University
    1
  • Landcare Research
    1
  • University of Missouri
    1
  • Lincoln University
    1
  • University of Canberra
    1
  • Appalachian State University
    1