48 Works

Data from: Competition and coexistence in plant communities: intraspecific competition is stronger than interspecific competition

Peter B. Adler, Danielle Smull, Karen H. Beard, Ryan T. Choi, Tucker Furniss, Andrew Kulmatiski, Joan M. Meiners, Andrew T. Tredennick & Kari E. Veblen
Theory predicts that intraspecific competition should be stronger than interspecific competition for any pair of stably coexisting species, yet previous literature reviews found little support for this pattern. We screened over 5400 publications and identified 39 studies that quantified phenomenological intraspecific and interspecific interactions in terrestrial plant communities. Of the 67% of species pairs in which both intra- and interspecific effects were negative (competition), intraspecific competition was, on average, four to five-fold stronger than interspecific...

Data from: Associations between blooming plants and their bee visitors in a riparian ecosystem in eastern Oregon

Samantha M. Roof, Sandra J. DeBano, Mary M. Rowland & Skyler Burrows
Native bees are declining world-wide, but conserving or restoring their habitat requires a better understanding of bee-flower associations. High quality bee habitat includes flowers that provide pollen and nectar preferred by bees. However, little data exist about which plants are commonly used by bees in the Pacific Northwest, or whether bees prefer certain plant characteristics over others. We examined bee and plant communities in an Oregon riparian ecosystem. Our purpose was to describe bee-plant associations,...

Data on Household Disaster Preparedness for U.S. States and Metropolitan Areas

Peter Howe
This dataset contains model estimates of the proportion of the adult population who report having supplies at home to use in case of a disaster, at the state level and Core-Based Statistical Area (CBSA) level in the U.S. “state_2015_table.csv” contains estimated proportion of adults (18+) who have set aside supplies at home in case of a disaster at the state level for 2015. “cbsa_2015_table.csv” contains estimated proportion of adults (18+) who have set aside supplies...

Mesospheric Densities and Temperatures Derived from 11 Years of Data Acquired with the Rayleigh-Scatter Lidar at the Atmospheric Lidar Observatory at Utah State University

Vincent Wickwar & Joshua Herron
Frequent observations were carried out with the Rayleigh-scatter lidar at Utah State University’s Atmospheric Lidar Observatory (41.742572° N, 111.808273° W, and 1466 m) from August 1993 through December 2004. Of 964 nights observed, a total of 839 nights were judged good for deriving temperatures. These 839 were reduced to obtain all-night relative neutral densities and absolute temperatures. These results extend from 45 to ≤ 95 km, thereby covering the mesosphere. This netCDF file starts by...

SDNET2018: A concrete crack image dataset for machine learning applications

Marc Maguire, Sattar Dorafshan & Robert J. Thomas
SDNET2018 is an annotated image dataset for training, validation, and benchmarking of artificial intelligence based crack detection algorithms for concrete. SDNET2018 contains over 56,000 images of cracked and non-cracked concrete bridge decks, walls, and pavements. The dataset includes cracks as narrow as 0.06 mm and as wide as 25 mm. The dataset also includes images with a variety of obstructions, including shadows, surface roughness, scaling, edges, holes, and background debris. SDNET2018 will be useful for...

Optimal Vehicle Trips (Cache County)

Arthur Caplan & Ramjee Acharya
This paper develops a conceptual model of optimal vehicle trips in a region plagued by weather-dependent, mobile-source air pollution, and numerically estimates optimal trips for one of the nation's perennially worst air quality regions in terms of short-term particulate matter. Based upon data-driven parameters and damage estimates, our numerical model generates steady-state values for region-wide vehicle trips and associated PM2.5 concentrations along with their corresponding optimal time paths. Our dataset includes a host of pertinent...

Preventative Capital Study (Cache County)

Arthur J. Caplan & Ramjee Acharya
We address the issue of optimal investment in “preventative capital” to mitigate episodic, mobile-source air pollution events. We calibrate Berry et al.'s (2015) endogenous-risk model using a unique dataset related to "red air day" episodes occurring in Northern Utah over the past decade. Our analysis demonstrates that, under a wide range of circumstances, the optimal steady-state level of preventative capital stock – raised through the issuance of a municipal “clean air bond” that funds more...

Data from: Polar Topside Ionosphere During Geomagnetic Storms: Comparison of ISIS-II with TDIM

Jan J. Sojka, Dan Rice, Michael David, Robert W. Schunk, Robert Benson & H. G. James
Output files from runs of the TDIM ionospheric model used for calculations and electron density profiles from ISIS-II and TDIM used in figures in the article in Radio Science.

Data from: Natural selection and the predictability of evolution in Timema stick insects

Patrik Nosil, Romain Villoutreix, Clarissa F. De Carvalho, Tim E. Farkas, Victor Soria-Carrasco, Jeff L. Feder, Bernard J. Crespi & Zachariah Gompert
Predicting evolution remains difficult. We studied the evolution of cryptic body coloration and pattern in a stick insect using 25 years of field data, experiments, and genomics. We found that evolution is more difficult to predict when it involves a balance between multiple selective factors and uncertainty in environmental conditions than when it involves feedback loops that cause consistent back-and-forth fluctuations. Specifically, changes in color-morph frequencies are modestly predictable through time (r2 = 0.14) and...

Data from: Long-term experimental hybridisation results in a heterologous transition and the evolution of a new sex chromosome in swordtail fish

Paolo Franchini, Julia C. Jones, Peiwen Xiong, Susanne Kneitz, Zachariah Gompert, Wesley C. Warren, Ronald B. Walter, Axel Meyer & Manfred Schartl
The remarkable diversity of sex determination mechanisms known in fish may be fuelled by exceptionally high rates of sex chromosome turnovers or transitions. However, the evolutionary causes and genomic mechanisms underlying this variation and instability are yet to be understood. Here we report on an over 30-year evolutionary experiment in which we tested the genomic consequences of hybridisation and selection between two Xiphophorus fish species with different sex chromosome systems. We find that introgression and...

Data from: Weak interspecific interactions in a sagebrush steppe? Conflicting evidence from observations and experiments

Peter B. Adler, Andrew Kleinhesselink, Giles Hooker, Joshua B. Taylor, Brittany Teller & Stephen P. Ellner
Stable coexistence requires intraspecific limitations to be stronger than interspecific limitations. The greater the difference between intra- and interspecific limitations, the more stable the coexistence, and the weaker the competitive release any species should experience following removal of competitors. We conducted a removal experiment to test whether a previously estimated model, showing surprisingly weak interspecific competition for four dominant species in a sagebrush steppe, accurately predicts competitive release. Our treatments were 1) removal of all...

Data from: Spatial heterogeneity in species composition constrains plant community responses to herbivory and fertilization

Dorothee Hodapp, Elizabeth T. Borer, W. Stanley Harpole, Eric M. Lind, Eric W. Seabloom, Peter B. Adler, Juan Alberti, Carlos A. Arnillas, Jonathan D. Bakker, Lori Biederman, Marc Cadotte, Elsa E. Cleland, Scott Collins, Philip A. Fay, Jennifer Firn, Nicole Hagenah, Yann Hautier, Oscar Iribarne, Johannes M.H. Knops, Rebecca L. McCulley, Andrew MacDougall, Joslin L. Moore, John W. Morgan, Brent Mortensen, Kimberly J. La Pierre … & Johannes M. H. Knops
Environmental change can result in substantial shifts in community composition. The associated immigration and extinction events are likely constrained by the spatial distribution of species. Still, studies on environmental change typically quantify biotic responses at single spatial (time series within a single plot) or temporal (spatial beta-diversity at single time points) scales, ignoring their potential interdependence. Here, we use data from a global network of grassland experiments to determine how turnover responses to two major...

Data from: Diel predator activity drives a dynamic landscape of fear

Michel T. Kohl, Daniel R. Stahler, Matthew C. Metz, James D. Forester, Matthew J. Kauffman, Nathan Varley, Patrick J. White, Douglas W. Smith & Daniel R. MacNulty
A ‘landscape of fear’ (LOF) is a map that describes continuous spatial variation in an animal’s perception of predation risk. The relief on this map reflects, for example, places that an animal avoids to minimize risk. Although the LOF concept is a potential unifying theme in ecology that is often invoked to explain the ecological and conservation significance of fear, little is known about the daily dynamics of a LOF. Despite theory and data to...

Data from: Local and system-wide adaptation is influenced by population connectivity

Patrik Nosil, Victor Soria-Carrasco, Jeffery L. Feder, Samuel M. Flaxman, Zachariah Gompert, Jeffrey L. Feder & Zach Gompert
Complex systems can be conceptualized and studied as networks of nodes with varying connectivity between nodes. In well-connected systems, local disturbance of individual nodes can be countered by input from neighbouring nodes, buffering the system against local change. Thus, pronounced change in a well-connected system may not occur until the system hits a threshold or ‘tipping point’ that drives a shift to an alternative, system-wide state. In contrast, poorly connected systems are more prone to...

USU Careers in Agriculture, Forestry, Natural Resources, grades 9-12

Tyson Sorenson, Olivia Horning & Joshua Dallin
These are brochures (three currently have been completed) that were developed as part of this grant to promote AFNR careers among high school-aged students. These brochures were developed with a focus on careers related to Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology. The brochures were distributed to participants of the workshop and with invitations for them to also distribute the brochures to their school's career/guidance counselors. The goal of the brochures is to help students learn about and...

Reproductive success of mountain pine beetle infesting cut bolts of Great Basin bristlecone pine, limber pine, and lodgepole pine

Barbara Bentz, Karen E. Mock & Erika Eidson
The preference-performance hypothesis states that ovipositing phytophagous insects will select host plants that are well-suited for their offspring and avoid host plants that do not support offspring performance (survival, development and fitness). The mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), a native insect herbivore in western North America, can successfully attack and reproduce in most species of Pinus throughout its native range. However, mountain pine beetles avoid attacking Great Basin bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva), despite recent climate-driven...

General NM data Jakus and Akhundjanov

Paul Jakus & Sherzod B. Akhundjanov
Large, landscape-scale national monuments have long been controversial. It has been claimed that large monuments harm local economies by restricting growth of the grazing, timber, mining, and energy industries. Others have asserted that large monuments aid economic growth by reducing reliance on volatile commodity markets and fostering tourism growth. In this study, we use a synthetic control approach to measure the average causal effect of nine national monument designations on county-level per capita income. We...

Data from: Energetic investment associated with vitellogenesis induces an oxidative cost of reproduction

Alison C. Webb, John B. Iverson, Charles R. Knapp, Dale F. DeNardo & Susannah S. French
1. Oxidative stress is a potential cost of reproduction, but conclusive evidence for this relationship is lacking. The goal of this study was to serially assess across a seasonal gradient the relationship between reproduction, circulating plasma energy metabolites, and oxidative state. 2. Here we examine a study animal ideally suited to test for the oxidative costs of reproduction: The Allen Cays Rock Iguana. Female rock iguanas reproduce at varying frequencies, often skipping years, allowing for...

Data from: Leaf nutrients, not specific leaf area, are consistent indicators of elevated nutrient inputs

Jennifer Firn, James M. McGree, Eric Harvey, Habacuc Flores-Moreno, Martin Schütz, Yvonne M. Buckley, Elizabeth T. Borer, Eric W. Seabloom, Kimberly J. La Pierre, Andrew M. MacDougall, Suzanne M. Prober, Carly J. Stevens, Lauren L. Sullivan, Erica Porter, Emma Ladouceur, Charlotte Allen, Karine H. Moromizato, John W. Morgan, W. Stanley Harpole, Yann Hautier, Nico Eisenhauer, Justin P. Wright, Peter B. Adler, Carlos Alberto Arnillas, Jonathan D. Bakker … & Anita C. Risch
Leaf traits are frequently measured in ecology to provide a ‘common currency’ for predicting how anthropogenic pressures impact ecosystem function. Here, we test whether leaf traits consistently respond to experimental treatments across 27 globally distributed grassland sites across 4 continents. We find that specific leaf area (leaf area per unit mass)—a commonly measured morphological trait inferring shifts between plant growth strategies—did not respond to up to four years of soil nutrient additions. Leaf nitrogen, phosphorus...

Data from: Combinations of plant water-stress and neonicotinoids can lead to secondary outbreaks of Banks grass mite (Oligonychus pratensis Banks)

Alice Ruckert, L. Niel Allen & Ricardo A. Ramirez
Spider mites, a cosmopolitan pest of agricultural and landscape plants, thrive under hot and dry conditions, which could become more frequent and extreme due to climate change. Recent work has shown that neonicotinoids, a widely used class of systemic insecticides that have come under scrutiny for non-target effects, can elevate spider mite populations. Both water-stress and neonicotinoids independently alter plant resistance against herbivores. Yet, the interaction between these two factors on spider mites is unclear,...

Data from: The truncated bell: an enigmatic but pervasive elevational diversity pattern in Middle American ants

John T. Longino & Michael G. Branstetter
Studies on elevation gradients in Panama and Costa Rica have shown that leaf-litter ants exhibit a mid-elevation peak in diversity. This diversity pattern has been observed in other groups and regions, but uncertainty remains as to just how pervasive it is and what might explain it. Here we examine the robustness of the mid-elevation peak in ant diversity across the entire Middle American corridor, from Veracruz, Mexico, to Costa Rica. We sampled 56 sites distributed...

Data from: Habitat segregation between brown bears and gray wolves in a human-dominated landscape

Cyril Milleret, Andrés Ordiz, Guillaume Chapron, Harry Peter Andreassen, Jonas Kindberg, Johan Månsson, Aimee Tallian, Petter Wabakken, Camilla Wikenros, Barbara Zimmermann, Jon E. Swenson & Håkan Sand
Identifying how sympatric species belonging to the same guild coexist is a major question of community ecology and conservation. Habitat segregation between two species might help reduce the effects of interspecific competition and apex predators are of special interest in this context, because their interactions can have consequences for lower trophic levels. However, habitat segregation between sympatric large carnivores has seldom been studied. Based on monitoring of 53 brown bears (Ursus arctos) and 7 sympatric...

Data from: Variable responses to novel hosts by populations of the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae)

Frank J. Messina, Alexandra M. Lish & Zachariah Gompert
Cosmopolitan pests can consist of geographic populations that differ in their current host ranges or in their ability to colonize a novel host. We compared the responses of cowpea-adapted seed-beetle populations (Callosobruchus maculatus [F.]) from Africa, North America, and South America to four novel legumes: chickpea, lentil, mung bean, and pea. We also qualitatively compared these results to those obtained earlier for an Asian population. For each host, we measured larval survival to adult emergence,...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    48

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    48

Affiliations

  • Utah State University
    48
  • University of Minnesota
    4
  • University of Washington
    3
  • University of Nevada Reno
    3
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    3
  • University of Guelph
    3
  • Texas State University
    3
  • University of Montana
    2
  • University of Pretoria
    2
  • University of Notre Dame
    2