16 Works

Neonate personality affects early-life resource acquisition in a large social mammal

Bawan Amin, Dómhnall Jennings, Alison Norman, Andrew Ryan, Vasiliki Ioannidis, Alice Magee, Hayley-Anne Haughey, Amy Haigh & Simone Ciuti
This file contains the raw data files and R-scripts used for producing the final data sets analyzed in the paper: "Neonate personality affects early-life resource acquisition in a large social mammal". A full and detailed description of the methods can be found in the manuscript, or at request from the author (BA). The R-scripts can be used to follow all the steps taken in producing the final data sets. The findings in the paper can...

The relative influence of sea surface temperature anomalies on the benthic composition of an Indo-Pacific and Caribbean coral reef over the last decade

Jack Johnson, Jack Johnson, Dan Exton, Jaimie Dick, Joseph Oakley, Jamaluddin Jompa & Daniel Pincheira-Donoso
Rising ocean temperatures are the primary driver of coral reef declines throughout the tropics. Such declines include reductions in coral cover that facilitate the monopolisation of the benthos by other taxa such as macroalgae, resulting in reduced habitat complexity and biodiversity. Long term monitoring projects present rare opportunities to assess how sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTAs) influence changes in the benthic composition of coral reefs across distinct locations. Here, using extensively monitored coral reef sites...

Assessing the effects of native and alien plant ash on mosquito abundance

Ross Cuthbert, Vincent Netshituni, Farai Dondofema & Tatenda Dalu
Plant invasions have been linked to displacement of native vegetation and altering of fire regimes and might influence vector mosquito populations by altering habitats or nutrient inputs. Whereas wildfire effects on terrestrial ecosystems are relatively well-studied, ash depositions into aquatic ecosystems and effects on semi-aquatic taxa such as mosquitoes have remained overlooked. Here, we investigated mosquito colonization in water treated with ash from native plants [quinine tree (Rauvolfia caffra), Transvaal milk plum (Englerophytum magalismontanum), apple...

Search strategies and methods to identify interventions for reducing the use of restrictive practices in children and young people’s institutional settings

Judy Wright, Donna C Irving & John Baker
The dataset includes a list of databases and other sources searched for the project along with search strategies for each source. Details of methods of search strategy development and duplicate removal are also included.

The first records of Sea Star Wasting Disease in Crossaster papposus in Europe

Samuel Smith, Ian Hewson & Patrick Collins
Sea Star Wasting Disease (SSWD) refers to a suite of gross pathological signs observed in Asteroidea species. It presents to varying degrees as abnormal posture, epidermal ulceration, arm autotomy and eversion of viscera. We report observations of SSWD in the sunstar Crossaster papposus, the first observations of its kind in Europe. While the exact cause of SSWD remains unknown, studies have proposed pathogenic and environmental-stress pathways for disease outbreaks. Although the present observations do not...

Stenotrophomonas isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis and other chronic respiratory infections

Ad Fluit, Jumamurat Bayjanov, María Díez Aguilar, Rafael Cantón, Stuart Elborn, Michael Tunney, Jelle Scharringa, Barry Benaissa-Trouw & Miquel Ekkelenkamp
Background: The potential pathogenic role of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in lung disease and in particular in cystic fibrosis is unclear. To develop further understanding of the biology of this taxa, the taxonomic position, antibiotic resistance and virulence factors of S. maltophilia isolates from patients with chronic lung disease were studied. Results: A total of 111 isolates recovered between 2003 and 2016 from respiratory samples from patients in five different countries were included. Based on a cut-off...

Local anthropogenic stress does not exacerbate coral bleaching under global climate change

Jack Johnson
Aim. Rising ocean temperatures are widely recognised as the dominant driver behind the rapid degradation of coral reefs via the process of coral bleaching (the expulsion of photosynthetic endosymbionts which reveals the coral skeleton). However, bleaching of hard corals is often assumed to be further aggravated by the effect of local-scale stressors from anthropogenic activity, accelerating coral reef decline where these stressors are stronger. Despite the importance of this hypothesis, the interaction between climate change...

Additional file 2 of A blood DNA methylation biomarker for predicting short-term risk of cardiovascular events

Andrea Cappozzo, Cathal McCrory, Oliver Robinson, Anna Freni Sterrantino, Carlotta Sacerdote, Vittorio Krogh, Salvatore Panico, Rosario Tumino, Licia Iacoviello, Fulvio Ricceri, Sabina Sieri, Paolo Chiodini, Gareth J. McKay, Amy Jayne McKnight, Frank Kee, Ian S. Young, Bernadette McGuinness, Eileen M. Crimmins, Thalida Em Arpawong, Rose Anne Kenny, Aisling O’Halloran, Silvia Polidoro, Giuliana Solinas, Paolo Vineis, Francesca Ieva … & Giovanni Fiorito
Additional file 2. Supplementary Tables S1, S2, and S3.

Data from: The evolutionary pathways for local adaptation in mountain hares

Iwona Giska, João Pimenta, Liliana Farelo, Pierre Boursot, Klaus Hackländer, Hannes Jenny, Neil Reid, W. Ian Montgomery, Paulo A. Prodöhl, Paulo C. Alves & José Melo-Ferreira
Understanding the evolution of local adaptations is a central aim of evolutionary biology and key for the identification of unique populations and lineages of conservation relevance. By combining RAD sequencing and whole-genome sequencing, we identify genetic signatures of local adaptation in mountain hares (Lepus timidus) from isolated and distinctive habitats of its wide distribution: Ireland, the Alps and Fennoscandia. We recovered full mitochondrial DNA sequences from whole-genome sequencing data and used it to recontruct the...

A general swimming response in exhausted obligate swimming fish

Gil Iosilevskii, Jacinta Kong, Carl Meyer, Yuuki Watanabe, Yannis Papastamatiou, Mark Royer, Itsumi Nakamura, Katsufumi Sato, Thomas Doyle, Luke Harman, Jonathan Houghton, Adam Barnett, Jayson Semmens, Niall Ó Maoléidigh, Alan Drumm, Ross O'Neill, Daniel Coffey & Nicholas Payne
Marine organisms normally swim at elevated speeds relative to cruising speeds only during strenuous activity, such as predation or escape. We measured swimming speeds of 29 ram ventilating sharks from 10 species and of three Atlantic bluefin tunas immediately after exhaustive exercise (fighting a capture by hook-and-line), and unexpectedly found all individuals exhibited a uniform mechanical response, with swimming speed initially 2 times higher than the cruising speeds reached approximately 6 hours later. We hypothesised...

Should we feed wildlife? Artificial feeding impacts neonate growth rates in a large free-ranging mammal

Laura Griffin, Amy Haigh, Bawan Amin, Jane Faull, Fiachra Corcoran, Connie Baker-Horne & Simone Ciuti
Variation and disparity in resource access between individuals in an animal population require attention within human-dominated landscapes where artificial selection processes may be at work. Independent, recreational human-wildlife feeding interactions constitute an increasingly prevalent yet understudied food resource for birds and mammals living in our cities, but only a limited number of risk-taking individuals may access it. Using urban fallow deer as our model species, we hypothesised that if these interactions result in positive effects...

Additional file 2 of A blood DNA methylation biomarker for predicting short-term risk of cardiovascular events

Andrea Cappozzo, Cathal McCrory, Oliver Robinson, Anna Freni Sterrantino, Carlotta Sacerdote, Vittorio Krogh, Salvatore Panico, Rosario Tumino, Licia Iacoviello, Fulvio Ricceri, Sabina Sieri, Paolo Chiodini, Gareth J. McKay, Amy Jayne McKnight, Frank Kee, Ian S. Young, Bernadette McGuinness, Eileen M. Crimmins, Thalida Em Arpawong, Rose Anne Kenny, Aisling O’Halloran, Silvia Polidoro, Giuliana Solinas, Paolo Vineis, Francesca Ieva … & Giovanni Fiorito
Additional file 2. Supplementary Tables S1, S2, and S3.

A comparison of density estimation methods for monitoring marked and unmarked animal populations

Joshua Twining, Ben Augustine, David Tosh, Denise O'Meara, Claire McFarlane, Marina Reyne, Sarah Helyar & Ian Montgomery
These data were generated to compare different methods of estimating population density from marked and unmarked animal populations. We compare conventional live trapping with two more modern, non-invasive field methods of population estimation: genetic fingerprinting from hair-tube sampling and camera trapping for the European pine marten (Martes martes). We used arrays of camera traps, live traps, and hair tubes to collect the relevant data in the Ring of Gullion in Northern Ireland. We apply marked...

Do alternative resources dampen functional responses of native but not alien gammarids?

Ross N Cuthbert, Syrmalenia G Kotronaki, Jasmin C Hütt, Elisabeth Renk, Niklas Warlo & Elizabeta Briski
While aquatic invasive predators are among the most impactful trophic groups, we lack understanding of whether alternative food resources mediate adverse predatory effects and stabilise native prey communities. Here, we use comparative functional responses to examine the influence of alternative food resources (Fucus sp.) on predator-prey interaction strengths from three gammarid crustaceans, with one native (Gammarus locusta) and two existing and emerging invasive (Gammarus tigrinus, Pontogammarus maeoticus, respectively) species, towards larval chironomid prey. All gammarids...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    16

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    16

Affiliations

  • Queen's University Belfast
    16
  • Trinity College Dublin
    3
  • Zhejiang University
    2
  • Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo
    2
  • Chengdu Third People's Hospital
    2
  • Gansu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine
    2
  • Jilin University
    2
  • Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine
    2
  • University of Insubria
    2
  • Fuzhou University
    2