50 Works

Daily ranging and den usage patterns structure fission-fusion dynamics and social associations in spotted hyenas

Eli Strauss, Frants Jensen, Andrew Gersick, Mara Thomas, Kay Holekamp & Ariana Strandburg-Peshkin
Environment structure often shapes social interactions. Spatial attractors that draw multiple individuals may play a particularly important role in dispersed groups, where individuals must first encounter one another to interact. We use GPS data recorded simultaneously from five spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) within a single clan to investigate how communal dens and daily ranging patterns shape fission-fusion dynamics (subgroup splits and merges). We introduce a species-general framework for identifying and characterizing dyadic fission-fusion events and...

Data from: Host-parasite dynamics shaped by temperature and genotype: quantifying the role of underlying vital rates

Marjolein Bruijning, Erlend Fossen, Eelke Jongejans, Héléne Vanvelk, Joost Raeymaekers, Lynn Govaert, Kristien Brans, Sigurd Einum & Luc De Meester
1. Global warming challenges the persistence of local populations, not only through heat-induced stress, but also through indirect biotic changes. We study the interactive effects of temperature, competition and parasitism in the water flea Daphnia magna. 2. We carried out a common garden experiment monitoring the dynamics of Daphnia populations along a temperature gradient. Halfway through the experiment, all populations became infected with the ectoparasite Amoebidium parasiticum, enabling us to study interactive effects of temperature...

The temporal dimension of plant-soil microbe interactions: mechanisms promoting feedback between generations

Po-Ju Ke & Jonathan Levine
Soil microbes can influence plant competitive outcomes by stabilizing plant community dynamics or mediating plant competitive hierarchies. Which effect dominates depends on whether microbial effects can extend beyond the focal conditioning individual. While it is well-known that microbial effects can extend to other individuals through space, we lack an explicit theoretical understanding of the factors that regulate their spread to other individuals in subsequent generations. Here, we examine how the commonly-assumed stabilizing effects of host-specific...

Cooperative communication with humans evolved to emerge early in domestic dogs

Hannah Salomons, Kyle C.M. Smith, Megan Callahan-Beckel, Margaret Callahan, Kerinne Levy, Brenda S. Kennedy, Emily E. Bray, Gitanjali E. Gnanadesikan, Daniel J. Horschler, Margaret Gruen, Jingzhi Tan, Philip White, Bridgett M. VonHoldt, Evan L. MacLean & Brian Hare
While we know that dogs evolved from wolves, it remains unclear how domestication affected dog cognition. One hypothesis suggests dog domestication altered social maturation by a process of selecting for an attraction to humans. Under this account, dogs became more flexible in using inherited skills to cooperatively-communicate with a new social partner that was previously feared and expressed these unusual social skills early in development. Here we tested dog (N=44) and wolf (N=37) puppies, 5-18...

Data for 'Environmental Benefits and Household Costs of Clean Heating Options in Northern China'

Mi Zhou, Liqun Peng, Lin Zhang & Denise Mauzerall
This dataset is created for the paper titled 'Environmental Benefits and Household Costs of Clean Heating Options in Northern China' and published on Nature Sustainability. Based on a 2015 regional anthropogenic emission inventory (base case), we propose seven counterfactual scenarios in which all 2015 residential solid fuel heating in northern China switches to one of the following non-district heating options: clean coal with improved stoves (CCIS), natural gas heaters (NGH), resistance heaters (RH), or air-to-air...

Shakespeare and Company Project Dataset: Lending Library Books

Joshua Kotin, Rebecca Sutton Koeser, Carl Adair, Serena Alagappan, Paige Allen, Jean Bauer, Oliver J. Browne, Nick Budak, Harriet Calver, Jin Yun Chow, Ian Davis, Gissoo Doroudian, Currie Engel, Violet Gautreua, Alex Gjaja, Elspeth Green, Isaac Hart, Benjamin Hicks, Madeleine E. Joelson, Carolyn Kelly, Sara Krolewski, Xinyi Li, Ellie Maag, Elizabeth Macksey, Cate Mahoney … & Clifford E. Wulfman
This dataset includes information about approximately 6,000 books and other items with bibliographic data as well as summary information about when the item circulated in the Shakespeare and Company lending library and the number of times an item was borrowed or purchased.

Shakespeare and Company Project Dataset: Lending Library Members, Books, Events

Joshua Kotin, Rebecca Sutton Koeser, Carl Adair, Serena Alagappan, Paige Allen, Jean Bauer, Oliver J. Browne, Nick Budak, Harriet Calver, Jin Yun Chow, Ian Davis, Gissoo Doroudian, Currie Engel, Violet Gautreua, Alex Gjaja, Elspeth Green, Isaac Hart, Benjamin Hicks, Madeleine E. Joelson, Carolyn Kelly, Sara Krolewski, Xinyi Li, Ellie Maag, Elizabeth Macksey, Cate Mahoney … & Clifford E. Wulfman
The Shakespeare and Company Project makes three datasets available to download in CSV and JSON formats. The datasets provide information about lending library members; the books that circulated in the lending library; and lending library events, including borrows, purchases, memberships, and renewals. The datasets may be used individually or in combination site URLs are consistent identifiers across all three. The DOIs for each dataset are as follows: Members (https://doi.org/10.34770/nsa4-3t76); Books (https://doi.org/10.34770/079z-h206); Events (https://doi.org/10.34770/rtbp-kv40).

Data for: 'Facies control on carbonate δ13C on the Great Bahama Bank'

Emily Geyman & Adam Maloof
The carbon isotopic (δ13C) composition of shallow-water carbonates often is interpreted to reflect the δ13C of the global ocean and is used as a proxy for changes in the global carbon cycle. However, local platform processes, in addition to meteoric and marine diagenesis, may decouple carbonate δ13C from that of the global ocean. To shed light on the extent to which changing sediment grain composition may produce δ13C shifts in the stratigraphic record, we present...

Delivery Gig Worker Interviews on Automation at Work

Diana Enriquez
These data include 39 structured interview transcripts. Each case is someone who worked at the time for Uber, UberEats, Lyft, and/or Amazon Flex (Amazon’s contractor delivery service). These data were collected between July and September 2019. All but one of the interviews occurred over the phone. My questions are focused on the structure of their gig work jobs and the technology they used at work or expected to use at work in the future. I...

Derrida's Margins datasets

Katie Chenoweth, Rebecca Koeser, Renée Altergott, Alexander Baron-Raiffe, Jean Bauer, Nicholas Budak, Chad Cordova, Austin Hancock, Benjamin Hicks, Kevin McElwee & Chloé Vettier
Derrida’s Margins is a website and online research tool for annotations from the Library of Jacques Derrida, housed at Princeton University Library (PUL) . Jacques Derrida is one of the major figures of twentieth-century thought, and his library--which bears the traces of decades of close reading--represents a major intellectual archive. This project focused on annotations related to Derrida’s landmark 1967 work De la grammatologie (Of Grammatology).

Data set for \"Role of contamination in optimal droplet production by collective bubble bursting\"

Luc Deike
Data set for Role of contamination in optimal droplet production by collective bubble bursting.

Collective detection based on visual information in animal groups

Jacob D. Davidson, Matthew M. G. Sosna, Colin R. Twomey, Vivek H. Sridhar, Simon P. Leblanc & Iain D. Couzin
We investigate key principles underlying individual, and collective, visual detection of stimuli, and how this relates to the internal structure of groups. While the individual and collective detection principles are generally applicable, we employ a model experimental system of schooling golden shiner fish ( Notemigonus crysoleucas ) to relate theory directly to empirical data, using computational reconstruction of the visual fields of all individuals. This reveals how the external visual information available to each group...

Human-associated microbiota suppress invading bacteria even under disruption by antibiotics

Andrew Letten, Michael Baumgartner, Katia Pfrunder-Cardozo, Jonathan Levine & Alex Hall
In light of their adverse impacts on resident microbial communities, it is widely predicted that broad-spectrum antibiotics can promote the spread of resistance by releasing resistant strains from competition with other strains and species. We investigated the competitive suppression of a resistant strain of Escherichia coli inoculated into human-associated communities in the presence and absence of the broad and narrow spectrum antibiotics rifampicin and polymyxin B, respectively. We found strong evidence of community-level suppression of...

Biodiversity data from: The mass extinction debt of the Anthropocene

Christopher Spalding & Pincelli Hull
To make sense of our present biodiversity crises, the modern rate of species extinctions is commonly compared to a benchmark, or “background,” rate derived from the fossil record. These estimates are critical for bounding the scale of modern diversity loss, but have yet to account for the fundamental structure of extinction rates through time. Namely, a substantial fraction of extinctions within the fossil record occur within relatively short-lived extinction pulses, and not during intervals characterized...

Dietary abundance distributions: Dominance and diversity in vertebrate diets

Matthew C. Hutchinson, Andrew P. Dobson & Robert M. Pringle
Diet composition is among the most important yet least understood dimensions of animal ecology. Inspired by the study of species-abundance distributions (SADs), we tested for generalities in the structure of vertebrate diets by characterizing them as dietary-abundance distributions (DADs). We compiled data on 1167 population-level diets, representing >500 species from 6 vertebrate classes, spanning all continents and oceans. DADs near-universally (92.5%) followed a hollow-curve shape, with scant support for other plausible rank-abundance-distribution shapes. This strong...

Seasonal strategies differ between tropical and extratropical herbivores

Joel Abraham, Gareth Hempson, Tyler Faith & Carla Staver
Seasonal diet shifts and migration are key components of large herbivore population dynamics, but we lack a systematic understanding of how these behaviors are distributed on a macroecological scale. The prevalence of seasonal strategies is likely related to herbivore body size and feeding guild, and may also be influenced by properties of the environment, such as soil nutrient availability and climate seasonality. We evaluated the distribution of seasonal dietary shifts and migration across large-bodied mammalian...

Large herbivores transform plant-pollinator networks in an African savanna

Matthew C. Hutchinson, Travis J. Guy, Todd M. Palmer, Robert M. Pringle, Katherine C. R. Baldock, Elisha Kayser, Benjamin Baiser, Phillip P. A. Staniczenko, Jacob R. Goheen, Robert M. Pringle & Todd M. Palmer
Pollination by animals is a key ecosystem service1,2 and interactions between plants and their pollinators are a model system for the study of ecological networks3,4, yet plant-pollinator networks are typically studied in isolation from the broader ecosystems in which they are embedded. The plants visited by pollinators also interact with other consumer guilds that eat stems, leaves, fruits, or seeds. One such guild, large mammalian herbivores, are well-known ecosystem engineers5–7 and may have substantial impacts...

Social media and public perception as core aspect of public health: the cautionary case of @realdonaldtrump and COVID-19

Jeffrey Peterson & Agustin Fuentes
The social media milieu in which we are enmeshed has substantive impacts on our beliefs and perceptions. Recent work has established that this can play a role in influencing understanding of, and reactions to, public health information. Twitter, in particular, appears to play a substantive role in the public health information ecosystem. From July 25th, 2020 to November 15th, 2020, we collected weekly tweets related to COVID-19 keywords and assessed their networks, patterns and properties....

Data and code from: Evolution of brilliant iridescent feather nanostructures

Klara Nordén, Chad Eliason & Mary Caswell Stoddard
The brilliant iridescent plumage of birds creates some of the most stunning color displays known in the natural world. Iridescent plumage colors are produced by nanostructures in feathers and have evolved in a wide variety of birds. The building blocks of these structures—melanosomes (melanin-filled organelles)—come in a variety of forms, yet how these different forms contribute to color production across birds remains unclear. Here, we leverage evolutionary analyses, optical simulations and reflectance spectrophotometry to uncover...

Data from: Competitive history shapes rapid evolution in a seasonal climate

Tess Grainger, Seth Rudman, Paul Schmidt & Jonathan Levine
Eco-evolutionary dynamics will play a critical role in determining species’ fates as climatic conditions change. Unfortunately, we have little understanding of how rapid evolutionary responses to climate play out when species are embedded in the competitive communities that they inhabit in nature. We tested the effects of rapid evolution in response to interspecific competition on subsequent ecological and evolutionary trajectories in a seasonally changing climate using a field-based evolution experiment with Drosophila melanogaster. Populations of...

Data from: Predicting range shifts of pikas (Mammalia, Ochotonidae) in China under scenarios incorporating land-use change, climate change, and dispersal limitations

Liang Ma, Chunrong Mi, Jiapeng Qu, Deyan Ge, Qisen Yang & David Wilcove
Two of the most important forces affecting biodiversity are land-use change (LUC) and global climate change (GCC). Previous studies have modeled their impacts on species separately and together, but few have done so for multiple species with dispersal limitations incorporated into the models. We integrate species distribution models plus a dispersal model to predict LUC and GCC impacts on the ranges of five species of pikas in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau region of China. Pikas are...

Rapid evolution of life history traits in response to warming, predation and competition: a meta-analysis

Tess Grainger & Jonathan Levine
Although studies quantifying evolutionary change in response to the selective pressures that organisms face in the wild have demonstrated that organisms can evolve rapidly, we lack a systematic assessment of the frequency, magnitude and direction of rapid evolutionary change across taxa. To address this gap, we conducted a meta-analysis of 58 studies that document the effects of warming, predation or competition on the evolution of body size, development rate or fecundity in natural or experimental...

Numbers of individuals and endemicity for birds in three study sites of the Himalayas-Hengduan mountains of China

Yiming Hu, Brett Scheffers, Xinyuan Pan, Huijian Hu, Zhixin Zhou, Dan Liang, Cheng Wenda, Zhixin Wen & Luke Gibson
1. Describing the patterns and revealing the underlying mechanisms responsible for variations in community structure remains a central focus in ecology. However, important gaps remain, including our understanding of species abundance. Most studies on abundance-based relationships are from either temperate ecosystems or tropical ecosystems, and few have explicitly tested abundance-based relationships across a temperate to tropical ecotone. 2. Here, we use a comprehensive dataset of breeding birds across elevation spanning a temperate to subtropical gradient...

Data for: 'How is sea level change encoded in carbonate stratigraphy?'

Emily Geyman, Adam Maloof & Blake Dyer
The history of organismal evolution, seawater chemistry, and paleoclimate is recorded in layers of carbonate sedimentary rock. Meter-scale cyclic stacking patterns in these carbonates often are interpreted as representing sea level change. A reliable sedimentary proxy for eustasy would be profoundly useful for reconstructing paleoclimate, since sea level responds to changes in temperature and ice volume. However, the translation from water depth to carbonate layering has proven difficult, with recent surveys of modern shallow water...

Why is El Nino warm?

Allison Hogikyan, Laure Resplandy, Wenchang Yang & Stephan Fueglistaler
Dataset constructed from GFDL-FLOR preindustrial control experiment run by Wenchang Yang (wenchang@princeton.edu) on Princeton University's tiger CPU. Processing by Allison Hogikyan (hogikyan@princeton.edu) on Princeton University's tigress data processing node. June 2021.

Registration Year

  • 2021
    50

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    50

Affiliations

  • Princeton University
    50
  • University of Florida
    5
  • Duke University
    4
  • University of Wyoming
    4
  • Yale University
    3
  • Cornell University
    3
  • Sun Yat-sen University
    2
  • University of Pennsylvania
    2
  • Stanford University
    2
  • Universität Hamburg
    2