694 Works

Data from: Bringing ecology blogging into the scientific fold: measuring reach and impact of science community blogs

Manu E. Saunders, Meghan A. Duffy, Stephen B. Heard, Margaret Kosmala, Simon R. Leather, Terrence P. McGlynn, Jeff Ollerton & Amy L. Parachnowitsch
The popularity of science blogging has increased in recent years, but the number of academic scientists who maintain regular blogs is limited. The role and impact of science communication blogs aimed at general audiences is often discussed, but the value of science community blogs aimed at the academic community has largely been overlooked. Here, we focus on our own experiences as bloggers to argue that science community blogs are valuable to the academic community. We...

PRISM-HD: Patient-Reported Impact of Symptoms in Huntington Disease

Alistair M Glidden, Elizabeth A Luebbe, Molly J Elson, Steven B Goldenthal, Christopher W Snyder, Christine E Zizzi, E Ray Dorsey & Chad R Heatwole
OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency and relative importance of symptoms experienced by adults with Huntington disease (HD) and to identify factors associated with a higher disease burden. METHODS: We performed 40 qualitative interviews (n = 20 with HD, n = 20 caregivers) and analyzed 2,082 quotes regarding the symptomatic burden of HD. We subsequently performed a cross-sectional study with 389 participants (n = 156 with HD [60 of whom were prodromal], n = 233 caregivers)...

Paraphyletic species no more – genomic data resolve a Pleistocene radiation and validate morphological species of the Melanoplus scudderi complex (Insecta: Orthoptera)

Jen-Pan Huang, JoVonn G. Hill, Joaquín Ortego & L. Lacey Knowles
Rapid speciation events, with taxa generated over a short time period, are among the most investigated biological phenomena. However, molecular systematics often reveals contradictory results compared with morphological/phenotypical diagnoses of species under scenarios of recent and rapid diversification. In this study, we used molecular data from an average of over 29,000 loci per sample from RADseq to reconstruct the diversification history and delimit the species boundary in a short-winged grasshopper species complex (Melanoplus Scudderi group),...

Data from: Reconstructing Asian faunal introductions to eastern Africa from multi-proxy biomolecular and archaeological datasets

Mary E. Prendergast, Michael Buckley, Alison Crowther, Heidi Eager, Laurent Frantz, Ophélie Lebrasseur, Rainer Hutterer, Ardern Hulme-Beaman, Wim Van Neer, Katerina Douka, Margaret-Ashley Veall, Eréndira M. Quintana Morales, Verena J. Schuenemann, Ella Reiter, Richard Allen, Evangelos A. Dimopoulos, Richard M. Helm, Ceri Shipton, Ogeto Mwebi, Christiane Denys, Mark C. Horton, Stephanie Wynne-Jones, Jeffrey Fleisher, Chantal Radimilahy, Henry Wright … & Mark Horton
Human-mediated biological exchange has had global social and ecological impacts. In sub-Saharan Africa, several domestic and commensal animals were introduced from Asia in the pre-modern period; however, the timing and nature of these introductions remain contentious. One model supports introduction to the eastern African coast after the mid-first millennium CE, while another posits introduction dating back to 3000 BCE. These distinct scenarios have implications for understanding the emergence of long-distance maritime connectivity, and the ecological...

Paleobiogeography, paleoecology, diversity, and speciation patterns in the Eublastoidea (Blastozoa: Echinodermata)

Jennifer Bauer
Understanding the distribution of taxa in space and time is key to understanding diversity dynamics. The fossil record provides an avenue to assess these patterns on vast timescales and through major global changes. The Eublastoidea were a conservatively plated Paleozoic echinoderm clade that range from the middle Silurian to the end Permian. The geographic distribution of the eublastoids, as a whole, has been qualitatively assessed but has historically lacked a quantitative analysis. This is the...

Data from: Making it last: storage time and temperature have differential impacts on metabolite profiles of airway samples from cystic fibrosis patients

Stephen Wandro, Lisa Carmody, Tara Gallagher, John J. LiPuma & Katrine Whiteson
Metabolites of human or microbial origin have the potential to be important biomarkers of disease state in cystic fibrosis (CF). Clinical sample collection and storage conditions may impact metabolite abundances with clinical relevance. We measured the change in metabolite composition based on untargeted gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) when CF sputum samples were stored at either 4°C, -20°C, or -80°C with one or two freeze-thaw cycles. Daily time points were taken for one week and...

A consensus phylogenomic approach highlights paleopolyploid and rapid radiation in the history of Ericales

Drew A. Larson, Joseph F. Walker, Oscar M. Vargas & Stephen A. Smith
Premise of study: Large genomic datasets offer the promise of resolving historically recalcitrant species relationships. However, different methodologies can yield conflicting results, especially when clades have experienced ancient, rapid diversification. Here, we analyzed the ancient radiation of Ericales and explored sources of uncertainty related to species tree inference, conflicting gene tree signal, and the inferred placement of gene and genome duplications. Methods: We used a hierarchical clustering approach, with tree-based homology and orthology detection, to...

Rapid and repeated divergence of animal chemical signals in an island introduction experiment

Colin Donihue, Anthony Herrel, José Martín, Johannes Foufopoulos, Panayiotis Pafilis & Simon Baeckens
Studies of animal communication have documented myriad rapid, context-dependent changes in visual and acoustic signal design. In contrast, relatively little is known about the capacity of vertebrate chemical signals to rapidly respond, either plastically or deterministically, to changes in context. Four years following an experimental introduction of lizards to replicate experimental islets, we aimed to determine if chemical signal design of the experimental populations differed from that of the source population. In 2014, we translocated...

Data from: Floral resource availability from groundcover promotes bee abundance in coffee agroecosystems

Kaleigh Fisher, David J. Gonthier, Katherine K. Ennis & Ivette Perfecto
Patterns of bee abundance and diversity across different spatial scales have received thorough research consideration. However, the impact of short and long term temporal resource availability on biodiversity has been less explored. This is highly relevant in tropical agricultural systems for pollinators, as many foraging periods of pollinators extend beyond flowering of any single crop species. In this study, we sought to understand how bee communities in tropical agroecosystems changed between seasons, and if short...

Data from: Wide but not impermeable: Testing the riverine barrier hypothesis for an Amazonian plant species

Alison G. Nazareno, Christopher W. Dick & Lucia G. Lohmann
Wallace's riverine barrier hypothesis postulates that large rivers, such as the Amazon and its tributaries, reduce or prevent gene flow between populations on opposite banks, leading to allopatry and areas of species endemism occupying interfluvial regions. Several studies have shown that two major tributaries, Rio Branco and Rio Negro, are important barriers to gene flow for birds, amphibians and primates. No botanical studies have considered the potential role of the Rio Branco as a barrier,...

A targeted phylogenetic approach helps explain New World functional diversity patterns of two eudicot lineages

Hector Figueroa & Stephen Smith
Aim: Large-scale functional diversity studies typically examine isolated traits, often without phylogenetic context. Here, we integrate data from five life-history traits with phylogeny and occurrence records to assess: (1) correlated latitudinal gradients of trait combinations; (2) which traits show phylogenetic conservatism; (3) quantitative, clade-specific differences in trait syndromes, illustrating the phylogenetic scale of observable variation in ecological strategies. Location: The Americas Taxon: Ericales (Asterids) and Fabales (Rosids) Methods: We used publicly-available trait data sets on...

Trade-offs in above and belowground biomass allocation influencing seedling growth in a tropical forest

Maria Natalia Umaña, Min Cao, Luxiang Lin, Nathan Swenson & Caicai Zhang
1. Plants allocate biomass to different organs in response to resource variation for maximizing performance, yet we lack a framework that adequately integrates plant responses to the simultaneous variation in above and belowground resources. Although traditionally, the optimal partition theory (OPT) has explained patterns of biomass allocation in response to a single limiting resource, it is well known that in natural communities multiple resources limit growth. We study trade-offs involved in plant biomass allocation patterns...

Dataset of Constraining fossil fuel CO2 emissions from urban area using OCO-2 observations of total column CO2

X. Ye, T. Lauvaux, E.A. Kort, T. Oda, S. Feng, J.C. Lin, E.G. Yang & D. Wu
Satellite observations of the total column dry-air CO2 (XCO2) are expected to support the quantification and monitoring of fossil fuel CO2 (ffCO2) emissions from urban areas. We evaluate the utility of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 (OCO-2) XCO2 retrievals to optimize whole-city emissions, using a Bayesian inversion system and high-resolution transport modeling. The uncertainties of constrained emissions related to transport model, satellite measurements, and local biospheric fluxes are quantified. For the first two uncertainty sources,...

Sensory pollutants alter bird phenology and fitness across a continent

Clinton Francis, Masayuki Senzaki, Jesse Barber, Jenny Phillips, Neil Carter, Caren Cooper, Mark Ditmer, Kurt Fristrup, Christopher McClure, Daniel Mennitt, Luke Tyrrell, Jelena Vukomanovic & Ashley Wilson
Expansion of anthropogenic noise and night-lighting across our planet is of increasing conservation concern Despite growing knowledge of physiological and behavioural responses to these stimuli from single-species and local-scale studies, whether these pollutants affect fitness is less clear, as is how and why species vary in their sensitivity to these anthropic stressors. Here, we leverage a large citizen science dataset paired with high-resolution noise and light data from across the contiguous United States to assess...

Data from: Character evolution and missing (morphological) data across Asteridae

Gregory W. Stull, Melanie Schori, Douglas E. Soltis & Pamela S. Soltis
Premise of the study: Our current understanding of flowering plant phylogeny provides an excellent framework for exploring various aspects of character evolution through comparative analyses. However, attempts to synthesize this phylogenetic framework with extensive morphological datasets have been surprisingly rare. Here, we explore character evolution in Asteridae (asterids), a major angiosperm clade, using an extensive morphological data set and a well-resolved phylogeny. Methods: We scored 15 phenotypic characters (spanning chemistry, vegetative anatomy, and floral, fruit,...

Disentangling sources of gene tree discordance in phylogenomic datasets: testing ancient hybridizations in Amaranthaceae s.l.

Diego F. Morales-Briones, Gudrun Kadereit, Delphine Tefarikis, Michael Moore, Stephen Smith, Samuel Brockington, Alfonso Timoneda, Won Yim, John Cushman & Ya Yang
Gene tree discordance in large genomic datasets can be caused by evolutionary processes such as incomplete lineage sorting and hybridization, as well as model violation, and errors in data processing, orthology inference, and gene tree estimation. Species tree methods that identify and accommodate all sources of conflict are not available, but a combination of multiple approaches can help tease apart alternative sources of conflict. Here, using a phylotranscriptomic analysis in combination with reference genomes, we...

Artificial night light helps account for observer bias in citizen science monitoring of an expanding large mammal population

Mark Ditmer, Fabiola Iannarilli, Andrew Tri, David Garshelis & Neil Carter
1. The integration of citizen scientists into ecological research is transforming how, where, and when data are collected, and expanding the potential scales of ecological studies. Citizen-science projects can provide numerous benefits for participants, while educating and connecting professionals with lay audiences, potentially increasing acceptance of conservation and management actions. However, for all the benefits, collection of citizen-science data is often biased towards areas that are easily accessible (e.g. developments and roadways), and thus data...

Data for: Light availability influences the intensity of nectar robbery and its effects on reproduction in a tropical shrub via multiple pathways

Gordon Fitch & John H. Vandermeer
The multiple exogenous pathways by which light availability affects plant reproduction – e.g. via influence on attraction of mutualists and antagonists – remain surprisingly understudied. The light environment experienced by a parent can also have transgenerational effects on offspring via these same pathways. Methods: We evaluated a) the influence of light availability on floral traits in Odontonema cuspidatum , b) the relative importance of the pathways by which light influences nectar robbery and reproductive output,...

Survey of Consumer Finances, 1952

This data collection is one in a series of financial surveys of consumers conducted annually since 1946. In a nationally representative sample, the head of each spending unit (usually the husband, the main earner, or the owner of the home) was interviewed. The basic unit of reference in the study was the spending unit, but some family data are also available. The questions in the 1952 survey covered the respondent's attitudes toward national economic conditions...

Data from: Clade-limited colonization in brood parasitic finches (Vidua spp.)

Michael D. Sorenson, Christopher N. Balakrishnan & Robert B. Payne
The African brood parasitic finches (Vidua spp.) are host specialists that mimic the songs and nestling mouth markings of their finch hosts (family Estrildidae). Although recent molecular analyses suggest rapid speciation associated with host switches in some members of this group, the association of different Vidua lineages with particular host genera suggests the possibility of cospeciation at higher levels in the host and parasite phylogenies. We compared a phylogeny of all Vidua species with a...

Data from: Developmental shifts in social cognition: socio-emotional biases across the lifespan in rhesus monkeys

Alexandra G. Rosati, Alyssa M. Arre, Michael L. Platt & Laurie R. Santos
Humans exhibit a suite of developmental changes in social cognition across the lifespan. To what extent are these developmental patterns unique? We first review several social domains in which humans undergo critical ontogenetic changes in socio-cognitive processing, including social attention and theory of mind. We then examine whether one human developmental transition—a shift in socioemotional preferences—also occurs in nonhuman primates. Specifically, we experimentally measured socioemotional processing in a large population of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)...

Thyroid hormone induces DNA demethylation in Xenopus tadpole brain

Robert Denver, Samhitha Raj, Yasuhiro Kyono, Christopher Sifuentes, Elvira Del Carmen Arellanes-Licea & Arasakumar Subramani
Thyroid hormone (T3) plays pivotal roles in vertebrate development, acting via nuclear receptors (TRs) that regulate gene transcription by promoting posttranslational modifications to histones. Methylation of cytosine residues in DNA also modulates gene transcription, and our recent finding of predominant DNA demethylation in the brain of Xenopus tadpoles at metamorphosis, a T3-dependent developmental process, caused us to hypothesize that T3 induces these changes in vivo. Treatment of pre-metamorphic tadpoles with T3 for 24 or 48...

Data from: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi mediate herbivore-induction of plant defenses differently above and belowground

Amanda R. Meier & Mark D. Hunter
Plants are exposed to herbivores and symbionts above and belowground. Herbivores aboveground alter plant defenses in both leaves and roots, affecting plant-herbivore interactions above and belowground. Root symbionts, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), also influence the defenses of leaves and roots, and alter plant responses to herbivory. However, we lack an understanding of how AMF mediate plant responses to herbivores simultaneously in above and belowground plant tissues, despite the ubiquity of such interactions and...

Data from: The effects of milkweed induced defense on parasite resistance in monarch butterflies, Danaus plexippus

Wen-Hao Tan, Leiling Tao, Kevin M. Hoang, Mark D. Hunter & Jacobus C. De Roode
Many plants express induced defenses against herbivores through increasing the production of toxic secondary chemicals following damage. Phytochemical induction can directly or indirectly affect other organisms within the community. In tri-trophic systems, increased concentrations of plant toxins could be detrimental to plants if herbivores can sequester these toxins as protective chemicals for themselves. Thus, through trophic interactions, induction can lead to either positive or negative effects on plant fitness. We examined the effects of milkweed...

Ultraconserved elements data for Amarsipus and Pelagiaria

Richard Harrington, Matt Friedman, Masaki Miya, Thomas Near & Matthew Campbell
Amarsipus carlsbergi is a rare mesopelagic fish distributed in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, and is the only species classified in the family Amarsipidae. Since its description in 1969, phylogenetic hypotheses have varied regarding its relationship with other percomorph lineages, but most have indicated a close relationship with the traditional suborder Stromateoidei. Molecular phylogenies place families previously classified in Stromateoidei within a diverse clade– Pelagiaria– that includes fishes such as tunas, cutlassfishes, and pomfrets. A...

Registration Year

  • 2023
    30
  • 2022
    181
  • 2021
    83
  • 2020
    76
  • 2019
    53
  • 2018
    67
  • 2017
    51
  • 2016
    42
  • 2015
    44
  • 2014
    40

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    694

Affiliations

  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    397
  • University of Michigan–Ann Arbor
    300
  • Fudan University
    125
  • Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College
    113
  • Huazhong University of Science and Technology
    109
  • Nanjing Medical University
    96
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
    92
  • Sun Yat-sen University
    90
  • Shanghai Jiao Tong University
    86
  • Peking University
    81