16 Works

Data from: Extensive trans-specific polymorphism at the mating type locus of the root decay fungus Heterobasidion

Linda T. A. Van Diepen, Åke Olson, Ihrmark Katarina, Jan Stenlid & Timothy Y. James
Incompatibility systems in which individuals bearing identical alleles reject each other favor the maintenance of a diversity of alleles. Mushroom mating type loci (MAT) encode for dozens or hundreds of incompatibility alleles whose loss from the population is greatly restricted through negative frequency selection, leading to a system of alleles with highly divergent sequences. Here we use DNA sequences of homeodomain (HD) encoding genes the MAT locus of five closely related species of the root...

Data from: Is permanent parasitism reversible? – Critical evidence from early evolution of house dust mites

Pavel B. Klimov & Barry OConnor
Long-term specialization may limit the ability of a species to respond to new environmental conditions and lead to a higher likelihood of extinction. For permanent parasites and other symbionts, the most intriguing question is whether these organisms can return to a free-living lifestyle and, thus, escape an evolutionary ‘dead end’. This question is directly related to Dollo's law, which stipulates that a complex trait (such as being free-living vs. parasitic) cannot re-evolve again in the...

Data from: Water stress strengthens mutualism among ants, trees, and scale insects

Elizabeth G. Pringle, Erol Akçay, Ted K. Raab, Rodolfo Dirzo & Deborah M. Gordon
Abiotic environmental variables strongly affect the outcomes of species interactions. For example, mutualistic interactions between species are often stronger when resources are limited. The effect might be indirect: water stress on plants can lead to carbon stress, which could alter carbon-mediated plant mutualisms. In mutualistic ant–plant symbioses, plants host ant colonies that defend them against herbivores. Here we show that the partners' investments in a widespread ant–plant symbiosis increase with water stress across 26 sites...

Data from: Integrative testing of how environments from the past to the present shape genetic structure across landscapes

Qixin He, Danielle L. Edwards & L. Lacey Knowles
Tests of the genetic structure of empirical populations typically focus on the correlative relationships between population connectivity and geographic and/or environmental factors in landscape genetics. However, such tests may overlook or misidentify the impact of such factors on genetic structure, especially when connectivity patterns differ between past and present populations because of shifting environmental conditions over time. Here we account for the underlying demographic component of population connectivity associated with a temporarily dynamic landscape in...

Data from: Trends in shell fragmentation as evidence of mid- Paleozoic changes in marine predation

Przemysław Gorzelak, Mariusz A. Salamon, Robert Niedźwiedzki, Dawid Trzęsiok & Tomasz K. Baumiller
Recent observations indicate that shell fragmentation can be a useful tool in assessing crushing predation in marine communities. However, criteria for recognizing shell breakage caused by durophagous predators versus physical factors are still not well established. Here, we provide data from tumbling and aquarium experiments to argue that physical and biotic processes lead to different patterns of shell damage, specifically that angular shell fragments are good indicators of durophagous predation. Using such angular shell fragments...

Data from: Are thyroid hormones mediators of incubation temperature-induced phenotypes in birds?

Sarah E. DuRant, Amanda W. Carter, Robert J. Denver, Gary R. Hepp & William A. Hopkins
Incubation temperature influences a suite of traits in avian offspring. However, the mechanisms underlying expression of these phenotypes are unknown. Given the importance of thyroid hormones in orchestrating developmental processes, we hypothesized that they may act as an upstream mechanism mediating the effects of temperature on hatchling phenotypic traits such as reduced growth and thermoregulation. We found that plasma T3, but not T4 concentrations, differed among newly-hatched wood ducks (Aix sponsa) from different embryonic incubation...

Data from: Diversification of mammals from the Miocene of Spain

M. Soledad Domingo, Catherine Badgley, Beatriz Azanza, Daniel DeMiguel & M. Teresa Alberdi
The mammalian fossil record of Spain is long and taxonomically well resolved, offering the most complete record of faunal change for the Neogene of Europe. We evaluated changes in diversification, composition, trophic structure, and size structure of large mammals over the middle and late Miocene with methods applied to this record for the first time, including ordination of fossil localities to improve temporal resolution and estimation of confidence intervals on taxa temporal ranges. By contrast,...

Data from: Upstream analyses create problems with DNA-based species delimitation

Melisa Olave, Eduard Solà & L. Lacey Knowles
Genetic-based delimitation of species typically involves a multistep process in which DNA data are analyzed with a series of different programs. Although the performance of the programs associated with each step has been evaluated separately, no analysis has considered how errors in the upstream assignment of individuals to putative species impacts the accuracy of species delimited in downstream analyses, such as those associated with the coalescent-based Bayesian program bpp. Here we show that because the...

Data from: Three keys to the radiation of angiosperms into freezing environments

Amy E. Zanne, David C. Tank, William K. Cornwell, Jonathan M. Eastman, Stephen A. Smith, Richard G. FitzJohn, Daniel J. McGlinn, Brian C. O'Meara, Angela T. Moles, Peter B. Reich, Dana L. Royer, Douglas E. Soltis, Peter F. Stevens, Mark Westoby, Ian J. Wright, Lonnie Aarssen, Robert I. Bertin, Andre Calaminus, Rafaël Govaerts, Frank Hemmings, Michelle R. Leishman, Jacek Oleksyn, Pamela S. Soltis, Nathan G. Swenson, Laura Warman … & Alejandro Ordonez
Early flowering plants are thought to have been woody species restricted to warm habitats1, 2, 3. This lineage has since radiated into almost every climate, with manifold growth forms4. As angiosperms spread and climate changed, they evolved mechanisms to cope with episodic freezing. To explore the evolution of traits underpinning the ability to persist in freezing conditions, we assembled a large species-level database of growth habit (woody or herbaceous; 49,064 species), as well as leaf...

Data from: Dispersal, niche breadth, and population extinction/colonization ratios predict range size in North American dragonflies

Shannon J. McCauley, Christopher J. Davis, Earl E. Werner, & Michael S. Robeson
1. Species’ range sizes are shaped by fundamental differences in species’ ecological and evolutionary characteristics, and understanding the mechanisms determining range size can shed light on the factors responsible for generating and structuring biological diversity. Moreover, because geographic range size is associated with a species’ risk of extinction and their ability to respond to global changes in climate and land use, understanding these mechanisms has important conservation implications. 2. Despite hypotheses that dispersal behaviour is...

Data from: Targeting global conservation funding to limit immediate biodiversity declines

Anthony Waldron, Arne O. Mooers, Daniel C. Miller, Nate Nibbelink, David Redding, Tyler S. Kuhn, J. Timmons Roberts & John L. Gittleman
Inadequate funding levels are a major impediment to effective global biodiversity conservation and are likely associated with recent failures to meet United Nations biodiversity targets. Some countries are more severely underfunded than others and therefore represent urgent financial priorities. However, attempts to identify these highly underfunded countries have been hampered for decades by poor and incomplete data on actual spending, coupled with uncertainty and lack of consensus over the relative size of spending gaps. Here,...

Data from: Species detection and individual assignment in species delimitation: can integrative data increase efficacy?

Danielle L. Edwards & L. Lacey Knowles
Statistical species delimitation usually relies on singular data, primarily genetic, for detecting putative species and individual assignment to putative species. Given the variety of speciation mechanisms, singular data may not adequately represent the genetic, morphological and ecological diversity relevant to species delimitation. We describe a methodological framework combining multivariate and clustering techniques that uses genetic, morphological and ecological data to detect and assign individuals to putative species. Our approach recovers a similar number of species...

Data from: Gene transfer from bacteria and archaea facilitated evolution of an extremophilic eukaryote

Gerald Schönknecht, Wei-Hua Chen, Chad M. Ternes, Guillaume G. Barbier, Roshan P. Shrestha, Mario Stanke, Andrea Bräutigam, Brett J. Baker, Jillian F. Banfield, R. Michael Garavito, Kevin Carr, Curtis Wilkerson, Stefan A. Rensing, David Gagneul, Nicholas E. Dickenson, Christine Oesterhelt, Martin J. Lercher & Andreas P. M. Weber
Some microbial eukaryotes, such as the extremophilic red alga Galdieria sulphuraria, can live in hot, toxic metal-rich, acidic environments. To elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of adaptation, we sequenced the 13.7 Mb genome of G. sulphuraria. This alga shows an enormous metabolic flexibility, growing either photoautotrophically or heterotrophically on more than 50 carbon sources. Environmental adaptation seems to have been facilitated by horizontal gene transfer from various bacteria and archaea, often followed by gene family...

Data from: Diversity dynamics of mammals in relation to tectonic and climatic history: comparison of three Neogene records from North America

Catherine Badgley & John A. Finarelli
In modern ecosystems, regions of topographic heterogeneity, when compared with nearby topographically homogeneous regions, support high species densities of mammals and other groups. This biogeographic pattern could be explained by either greater diversification rates or greater accommodation of species in topographically complex regions. In this context, we assess the hypothesis that changes in landscape history have stimulated diversification in mammals. Landscape history includes tectonic and climatic processes that influence topographic complexity at regional scales. We...

Data from: Rates of speciation and morphological evolution are correlated across the largest vertebrate radiation

Daniel L. Rabosky, Francesco Santini, Jonathan Eastman, Stephen A. Smtih, Brian Sidlauskas, Jonathan Chang & Michael E. Alfaro
Several evolutionary theories predict that rates of morphological change should be positively associated with the rate at which new species arise. For example, the theory of punctuated equilibrium proposes that phenotypic change typically occurs in rapid bursts associated with speciation events. However, recent phylogenetic studies have found little evidence linking these processes in nature. Here we demonstrate that rates of species diversification are highly correlated with the rate of body size evolution across the 30,000+...

Data from: Stress hormones mediate predator-induced phenotypic plasticity in amphibian tadpoles

Jessica Middlemis Maher, Earl E. Werner & Robert J. Denver
Amphibian tadpoles display extensive anti-predator phenotypic plasticity, reducing locomotory activity and, with chronic predator exposure, developing relatively smaller trunks and larger tails. In many vertebrates, predator exposure alters activity of the neuroendocrine stress axis. We investigated predator-induced effects on stress hormone production and the mechanistic link to anti-predator defences in Rana sylvatica tadpoles. Whole-body corticosterone (CORT) content was positively correlated with predator biomass in natural ponds. Exposure to caged predators in mesocosms caused a reduction...

Registration Year

  • 2013
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    16
  • Department of Plant Biology
    2
  • Oklahoma State University
    2
  • University of Tennessee at Knoxville
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  • University of Idaho
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  • Yale University
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  • Michigan State University
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  • University of Washington
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  • Stanford University
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  • Utah State University
    1