51 Works

Data from: Genomic analysis of a cardinalfish with larval homing potential reveals genetic admixture in the Okinawa Islands

Alison L. Gould & Paul V. Dunlap
Discrepancies between potential and observed dispersal distances of reef fish indicate the need for a better understanding of the influence of larval behaviour on recruitment and dispersal. Population genetic studies can provide insight on the degree to which populations are connected, and the development of restriction site-associated sequencing (RAD-Seq) methods has made such studies of nonmodel organisms more accessible. We applied double-digest RAD-Seq methods to test for population differentiation in the coral reef-dwelling cardinalfish, Siphamia...

Data from: Safari science: assessing the reliability of citizen science data for wildlife surveys

Cara Steger, Bilal Butt & Mevin B. Hooten
1. Protected areas are the cornerstone of global conservation, yet financial support for basic monitoring infrastructure is lacking in 60% of them. Citizen science holds potential to address these shortcomings in wildlife monitoring, particularly for resource-limited conservation initiatives in developing countries - if we can account for the reliability of data produced by volunteer citizen scientists (VCS) . 2. This study tests the reliability of VCS data vs. data produced by trained ecologists, presenting a...

Data from: Consequences of divergence and introgression for speciation in Andean cloud forest birds

Benjamin M. Winger
Divergence with gene flow is well documented and reveals the influence of ecological adaptation on speciation. Yet it remains intuitive that gene exchange inhibits speciation in many scenarios, particularly among ecologically similar populations. The influence of gene flow on the divergence of populations facing similar selection pressures has received less empirical attention than scenarios where differentiation is coupled with local environmental adaptation. I used a paired study design to test the influence of genomic divergence...

Data from: Squamate Conserved Loci (SqCL): a unified set of conserved loci for phylogenomics and population genetics of squamate reptiles

Sonal Singhal, Maggie Grundler, Guarino Colli & Daniel L. Rabosky
The identification of conserved loci across genomes, along with advances in target capture methods and high-throughput sequencing, has helped spur a phylogenomics revolution by enabling researchers to gather large numbers of homologous loci across clades of interest with minimal upfront investment in locus design. Target capture for vertebrate animals is currently dominated by two approaches – anchored hybrid enrichment (AHE) and ultraconserved elements (UCE) – and both approaches have proven useful for addressing questions in...

Data from: The past sure is tense: on interpreting phylogenetic divergence time estimates

Joseph W. Brown & Stephen A. Smith
Divergence time estimation — the calibration of a phylogeny to geological time — is an integral first step in modelling the tempo of biological evolution (traits and lineages). However, despite increasingly sophisticated methods to infer divergence times from molecular genetic sequences, the estimated age of many nodes across the tree of life contrast significantly and consistently with timeframes conveyed by the fossil record. This is perhaps best exemplified by crown angiosperms, where molecular clock (Triassic)...

Data from: Ecological interactions and coexistence are predicted by gene expression similarity in freshwater green algae

Anita Narwani, Bastian Bentlage, Markos A. Alexandrou, Keith J. Fritschie, Charles Delwiche, Todd H. Oakley & Bradley J. Cardinale
Phenotypic variation controls the species interactions which determine whether or not species coexist. Long-standing hypotheses in ecology and evolution posit that phenotypic differentiation enables coexistence by increasing the size of niche differentiation. This hypothesis has only been tested using macroscopic traits to date, but niche differentiation, particularly of microscopic organisms, also occurs at the molecular and metabolic level. We examined how phenotypic variation that arises at the level of gene expression over evolutionary time affects...

Data from: Heritable variation in colour patterns mediating individual recognition

Michael J. Sheehan, Juanita Choo & Elizabeth A. Tibbetts
Understanding the developmental and evolutionary processes that generate and maintain variation in natural populations remains a major challenge for modern biology. Populations of Polistes fuscatus paper wasps have highly variable colour patterns that mediate individual recognition. Previous experimental and comparative studies have provided evidence that colour pattern diversity is the result of selection for individuals to advertise their identity. Distinctive identity-signalling phenotypes facilitate recognition, which reduces aggression between familiar individuals in P. fuscatus wasps. Selection...

Data from: Anthropogenic N deposition increases soil C storage by reducing the relative abundance of lignolytic fungi

Elizabeth M. Entwistle, Donald R. Zak & William A. Argiroff
Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition has increased dramatically since preindustrial times and continues to increase across many regions of the Earth. In temperate forests, this agent of global change has increased soil carbon (C) storage, but the mechanisms underlying this response are not understood. One long-standing hypothesis proposed to explain the accumulation of soil C proposes that higher inorganic N availability may suppress both the activity and abundance of fungi which decay lignin and other polyphenols...

Data from: Group augmentation, collective action, and territorial boundary patrols by male chimpanzees

Kevin E. Langergraber, David P. Watts, Linda Vigilant & John C. Mitani
How can collective action evolve when individuals benefit from cooperation regardless of whether they pay its participation costs? According to one influential perspective, collective action problems are common, especially when groups are large, but may be solved when individuals who have more to gain from the collective good or can produce it at low costs provide it to others as a byproduct. Several results from a 20-y study of one of the most striking examples...

Correlates of War, 1816-1997

J. David Singer & Melvin Small
This data collection is part of the Correlates of War (COW) Project at the University of Michigan under the guidance of J. David Singer and Melvin Small. The data contain statistics of extra-, inter-, and intra-state wars fought from 1816-1997. Variables for extra-state wars include name of war, name of participants, date ranges, victor designation, outside intervention, theater designation, and total battle deaths. Inter-state wars include date ranges, on which side the state intervened, if...

Data from: Linking micro- and macroevolutionary perspectives to evaluate the role of Quaternary sea-level oscillations in island diversification

Anna Papadopoulou & L. Lacey Knowles
With shifts in island area, isolation, and cycles of island fusion-fission, the role of Quaternary sea-level oscillations as drivers of diversification is complex and not well understood. Here we conduct parallel comparisons of population and species divergence between two island areas of equivalent size that have been affected differently by sea-level oscillations, with the aim to understand the micro- and macroevolutionary dynamics associated with sea-level change. Using genome-wide datasets for a clade of seven Amphiacusta...

Data from: From the track to the ocean: using flow control to improve marine bio-logging tags for cetaceans

Giovani Fiore, Erik Anderson, C. Spencer Garborg, Mark Murray, Mark Johnson, Michael J. Moore, Laurens Howle & K. Alex Shorter
Bio-logging tags are an important tool for the study of cetaceans, but superficial tags inevitably increase hydrodynamic loading. Substantial forces can be generated by tags on fast-swimming animals, potentially affecting behavior and energetics or promoting early tag removal. Streamlined forms have been used to reduce loading, but these designs can accelerate flow over the top of the tag. This non-axisymmetric flow results in large lift forces (normal to the animal) that become the dominant force...

Data from: Genomic signatures of paleodrainages in a freshwater fish along the southeastern coast of Brazil: genetic structure reflects past riverine properties

Andrea T. Thomaz, Luiz R. Malabarba & L. Lacey Knowles
Past shifts in connectivity in riverine environments (for example, sea-level changes) and the properties of current drainages can act as drivers of genetic structure and demographic processes in riverine population of fishes. However, it is unclear whether the same river properties that structure variation on recent timescales will also leave similar genomic signatures that reflect paleodrainage properties. By characterizing genetic structure in a freshwater fish species (Hollandichthys multifasciatus) from a system of basins along the...

Data from: Bayesian and likelihood phylogenetic reconstructions of morphological traits are not discordant when taking uncertainty into consideration: a comment on Puttick et al

Joseph W. Brown, Caroline Parins-Fukuchi, Gregory W. Stull, Oscar M. Vargas & Stephen A. Smith
Puttick et al. (2017 Proc. R. Soc. B 284, 20162290 (doi:10.1098/rspb.2016.2290)) performed a simulation study to compare accuracy among methods of inferring phylogeny from discrete morphological characters. They report that a Bayesian implementation of the Mk model (Lewis 2001 Syst. Biol. 50, 913–925 (doi:10.1080/106351501753462876)) was most accurate (but with low resolution), while a maximum-likelihood (ML) implementation of the same model was least accurate. They conclude by strongly advocating that Bayesian implementations of the Mk model...

Data from: Multilevel and sex-specific selection on competitive traits in North American red squirrels.

David N. Fisher, Stan Boutin, Ben Dantzer, Murray M. Humphries, Jeffrey E. Lane & Andrew G. McAdam
Individuals often interact more closely with some members of the population (e.g. offspring, siblings or group members) than they do with other individuals. This structuring of interactions can lead to multilevel natural selection, where traits expressed at the group-level influence fitness alongside individual-level traits. Such multilevel selection can alter evolutionary trajectories, yet is rarely quantified in the wild, especially for species that do not interact in clearly demarcated groups. We quantified multilevel natural selection on...

Data from: Detecting ancient co-dispersals and host shifts by double dating of host and parasite phylogenies: application in proctophyllodid feather mites associated with passerine birds

Pavel B. Klimov, Sergey V. Mironov & Barry M. OConnor
Inferring co-phylogeographic events requires matching the timing of these events on both host and symbiont (e.g., parasites) phylogenies because divergences of hosts and their symbionts may not temporally coincide, and host switches may occur. We investigate a large radiation of birds (Passeriformes) and their permanent symbionts, the proctophyllodid feather mites (117 species from 116 bird species; 6 genes, 11,468 nt aligned) using two time-calibration strategies for mites: fossils only and host phylogeography only. Out of...

Data from: Daphniid zooplankton assemblage shifts in response to eutrophication and metal contamination during the Anthropocene

Mary Alta Rogalski, Peter R. Leavitt & David K. Skelly
Human activities during the Anthropocene result in habitat degradation that has been associated with biodiversity loss and taxonomic homogenization of ecological communities. Here we estimated effects of eutrophication and heavy metal contamination, separately and in combination, in explaining zooplankton species composition during the past 125–145 years using analysis of daphniid diapausing egg banks from four lakes in the northeastern USA. We then examined how these community shifts influenced patterns of diversity and homogenization. Analysis of...

Data from: Use of continuous traits can improve morphological phylogenetics

Caroline Parins-Fukuchi
The recent surge in enthusiasm for simultaneously inferring relationships from extinct and extant species has reinvigorated interest in statistical approaches for modelling morphological evolution. Current statistical methods use the Mk model to describe substitutions between discrete character states. Although representing a significant step forward, the Mk model presents challenges in biological interpretation, and its adequacy in modelling morphological evolution has not been well explored. Another major hurdle in morphological phylogenetics concerns the process of character...

Data from: Quartet Sampling distinguishes lack of support from conflicting support in the green plant tree of life

James B. Pease, Joseph W. Brown, Joseph F. Walker, Cody E. Hinchliff & Stephen A. Smith
Premise of the Study—Phylogenetic support has been difficult to evaluate within the green plant tree of life partly due to a lack of specificity between conflicted versus poorly informed branches. As datasets continue to expand in both breadth and depth, new support measures are needed that are more efficient and informative. Methods— We describe the Quartet Sampling (QS) method, a quartet-based evaluation system that synthesizes several phylogenetic and genomic analytical approaches. QS characterizes discordance in...

Data from: Minimum sample sizes for population genomics: an empirical study from an Amazonian plant species

Alison G. Nazareno, Jordan B. Bemmels, Christopher W. Dick & Lúcia G. Lohmann
High throughput DNA sequencing facilitates the analysis of large portions of the genome in non-model organisms, ensuring high accuracy of population genetic parameters. However, empirical studies evaluating the appropriate sample size for these kinds of studies are still scarce. In this study, we use double digest restriction associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq) to recover thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for two physically isolated populations of Amphirrhox longifolia (Violaceae), a non-model plant species for which no...

Data from: Divergence of thermal physiological traits in terrestrial breeding frogs along a tropical elevational gradient

Rudolf Von May, Alessandro Catenazzi, Ammon Corl, Roy Santa-Cruz, Ana Carolina Carnaval & Craig Moritz
Critical thermal limits are thought to be correlated with the elevational distribution of species living in tropical montane regions, but with upper limits being relatively invariant compared to lower limits. To test this hypothesis, we examined the variation of thermal physiological traits in a group of terrestrial breeding frogs (Craugastoridae) distributed along a tropical elevational gradient. We measured the critical thermal maximum (CTmax; n = 22 species) and critical thermal minimum (CTmin; n = 14...

Data from: Stream nitrogen concentration, but not plant N-fixing capacity, modulates litter diversity effects on decomposition

Alan M. Tonin, Luz Boyero, Silvia Monroy, Ana Basaguren, Javier Perez, Richard G. Pearson, Bradley J. Cardinale, & Jesus Pozo
1. We are facing major biodiversity loss and there is evidence that such loss can alter ecosystem functioning. However, the effects of plant diversity on decomposition – a key component of the global carbon cycle – are still unclear. A recent study suggested that a plant trait – their nitrogen (N)-fixing capacity – could mediate effects of litter diversity on decomposition by means of a microbial transfer of N from N-fixers to non-fixers. 2. We...

Data from: Widespread paleopolyploidy, gene tree conflict, and recalcitrant relationships among the carnivorous Caryophyllales

Joseph F. Walker, Ya Yang, Moore J. Michael, Jessica Mikenas, Alfonso Timoneda, Samuel Frasier Brockington, Stephen Andrew Smith & Michael J. Moore
PREMISE OF STUDY: The carnivorous members of the large, hyperdiverse Caryophyllales (e.g., Venus flytrap, sundews, and Nepenthes pitcher plants) represent perhaps the oldest and most diverse lineage of carnivorous plants. However, despite numerous studies seeking to elucidate their evolutionary relationships, the early-diverging relationships remain unresolved. METHODS: To explore the utility of phylogenomic data sets for resolving relationships among the carnivorous Caryophyllales, we sequenced 10 transcriptomes, including all the carnivorous genera except those in the rare...

Census of Population and Housing, 1980: Extract Data

Terry K. Adams
This extraction of data from 1980 decennial Census files (CENSUS OF POPULATION AND HOUSING, 1980 UNITED STATES: SUMMARY TAPE FILES 3A AND 3B (ICPSR 8071, 8318)) was designed to provide a set of contextual variables to be matched to any survey dataset that has been coded for the geographic location of respondents, such as the PANEL STUDY OF INCOME DYNAMICS, 1968-1988 (ICPSR 7439). This geographic area data can also be analyzed independently with neighborhoods, labor...

Data from: A nutrient mediates intraspecific competition between rodent malaria parasites in vivo

Nina Wale, Derek G. Sim & Andrew F. Read
Hosts are often infected with multiple strains of a single parasite species. Within-host competition between parasite strains can be intense and has implications for the evolution of traits that impact patient health, such as drug resistance and virulence. Yet the mechanistic basis of within-host competition is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that a parasite nutrient, para-aminobenzoic acid (pABA), mediates competition between a drug resistant and drug susceptible strain of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi. We...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    51

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    51

Affiliations

  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    46
  • University of Michigan–Ann Arbor
    5
  • Wayne State University
    3
  • University of Cambridge
    3
  • University of Minnesota
    3
  • University of California, Berkeley
    3
  • University of Sao Paulo
    3
  • Oberlin College
    3
  • University of California System
    2
  • University of Georgia
    2