66 Works

Data from: Parasite rearing and infection temperatures jointly influence disease transmission and shape seasonality of epidemics

Marta S. Shocket, Daniela Vergara, Andrew J. Sickbert, Jason M. Walsman, Alexander T. Strauss, Jessica L. Hite, Meghan A. Duffy, Carla E. Cáceres & Spencer R. Hall
Seasonal epidemics erupt commonly in nature and are driven by numerous mechanisms. Here, we suggest a new mechanism that could determine the size and timing of seasonal epidemics: rearing environment changes the performance of parasites. This mechanism arises when the environmental conditions in which a parasite is produced impact its performance—independently from the current environment. To illustrate the potential for ‘rearing effects’, we show how temperature influences infection risk (transmission rate) in a Daphnia-fungus disease...

Data from: Ranking stressor impacts on periphyton structure and function with mesocosm experiments and environmental-change forecasts

David M. Costello, Konrad J. Kulacki, Mary E. McCarthy, Scott D. Tiegs & Bradley J. Cardinale
Streams are being subjected to physical, chemical, and biological stresses stemming from both natural and anthropogenic changes to the planet. In the face of limited time and resources, scientists, resource managers, and policy makers need ways to rank stressors and their impacts so that we can prioritize them from the most to least important (i.e., perform 'ecological triage'). We report results from an experiment in which we established a periphyton community from the Huron River...

Data from: Fully automated sequence alignment methods are comparable to, and much faster than, traditional methods in large data sets: an example with hepatitis B virus

Therese A. Catanach, Andrew D. Sweet, Nam-Phuong D. Nguyen, Rhiannon M. Peery, Andrew H. Debevec, Andrea K. Thomer, Amanda C. Owings, Bret M. Boyd, Aron D. Katz, Felipe N. Soto-Adames & Julie M. Allen
Aligning sequences for phylogenetic analysis (multiple sequence alignment; MSA) is an important, but increasingly computationally expensive step with the recent surge in DNA sequence data. Much of this sequence data is publicly available, but can be extremely fragmentary (i.e., a combination of full genomes and genomic fragments), which can compound the computational issues related to MSA. Traditionally, alignments are produced with automated algorithms and then checked and/or corrected “by eye” prior to phylogenetic inference. However,...

Data from: Mycorrhizae alter toxin sequestration and performance of two specialist herbivores

Amanda R. Meier & Mark D. Hunter
Multitrophic species interactions are shaped by both top-down and bottom-up factors. Belowground symbionts of plants, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), can alter the strength of these forces by altering plant phenotype. For example, AMF-mediated changes in foliar toxin and nutrient concentrations may influence herbivore growth and fecundity. In addition, many specialist herbivores sequester toxins from their host plants to resist natural enemies, and the extent of sequestration varies with host plant secondary chemistry. Therefore,...

Data from: Progressive sensitivity of trophic levels to warming underlies an elevational gradient in ant-aphid mutualism strength

Annika S. Nelson, Riley T. Pratt, Jessica D. Pratt, Richard Alexander Smith, Cole T. Symanski, Cathrine Prenot & Kailen A. Mooney
Although species interactions are often proposed to be stronger at lower latitudes and elevations, few studies have evaluated the mechanisms driving such patterns. In this study, we assessed whether, and by which mechanisms, abiotic changes associated with elevation altered the outcome of an ant-aphid protection mutualism. To do so, we characterized the multi-trophic interactions among the ant Formica podzolica, the aphid Aphis varians, and aphid natural enemies occurring on the plant Chamerion angustifolium within replicate...

Data from: Filter-dispersal assembly of lowland Neotropical rainforests across the Andes

Jordan B. Bemmels, S. Joseph Wright, Nancy C. Garwood, Simon A. Queenborough, Renato Valencia & Christopher W. Dick
Numerous Neotropical rainforest species are distributed in both Amazonia and Central America, reflecting a rich history of biotic interchange between regions. However, some plant lineages are endemic to one region, due in part to the dispersal barrier posed by the northern Andean cordilleras and adjacent savannas. To investigate the role of biogeographic filtering across the northern Andes in regional community assembly, we examined environmental tolerances, functional traits, and biogeographic distributions of >1000 woody plant species...

Data from: Is biasing offspring sex ratio adaptive? a test of Fisher’s principle across multiple generations of a wild mammal in a fluctuating environment

Andrea E. Wishart, Cory T. Williams, Andrew G. McAdam, Stan Boutin, Ben Dantzer, Murray M. Humphries, Dave W. Coltman, Jeffrey E. Lane & David W. Coltman
Fisher’s principle explains that population sex ratio in sexually reproducing organisms is maintained at 1:1 due to negative frequency-dependent selection, such that individuals of the rare sex realize greater reproductive opportunity than individuals of the more common sex until equilibrium is reached. If biasing offspring sex ratio towards the rare sex is adaptive, individuals that do so should have a higher number of grandoffspring. In a wild population of North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus)...

Data from: The global geography of human subsistence

Michael C. Gavin, Patrick H. Kavanagh, Hannah J. Haynie, Claire Bowern, Carol R. Ember, Russell D. Gray, Fiona M. Jordan, Kathryn R. Kirby, Geoff Kushnick, Bobbi S. Low, Bruno Vilela & Carlos A. Botero
How humans obtain food has dramatically reshaped ecosystems and altered both the trajectory of human history and the characteristics of human societies. Our species’ subsistence varies widely, from predominantly foraging strategies, to plant-based agriculture and animal husbandry. The extent to which environmental, social, and historical factors have driven such variation is currently unclear. Prior attempts to resolve long-standing debates on this topic have been hampered by an over-reliance on narrative arguments, small and geographically-narrow samples,...

Data from: From cacti to carnivores: improved phylotranscriptomic sampling and hierarchical homology inference provide further insight into the evolution of Caryophyllales

Joseph Frederic Walker, Ya Yang, Tao Feng, Alfonso Timoneda, Jessica Mikenas, Vera Hutchison, Caroline Edwards, Ning Wang, Sonia Ahluwalia, Julia Olivieri, Nathanael Walker-Hale, Lucas C. Majure, Raúl Puente, Gudrun Kadereit, Maximillian Lauterbach, Urs Eggli, Hilda Flores-Olvera, Helga Ochoterena, Samuel F. Brockington, Michael J. Moore & Stephen A. Smith
Premise of the Study— The Caryophyllales contains ~12,500 species and is known for its cosmopolitan distribution, convergence of trait evolution, and extreme adaptations. Some relationships within the Caryophyllales, like those of many large plant clades, remain unclear and phylogenetic studies often recover alternative hypotheses. We explore the utility of broad and dense transcriptome sampling across the order for resolving evolutionary relationships in Caryophyllales. Methods— We generated 84 transcriptomes and combined these with 224 publicly available...

Data from: Elevated atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide reduce monarch tolerance and increase parasite virulence by altering the medicinal properties of milkweeds

Leslie E. Decker, Jacobus C. De Roode & Mark D. Hunter
Hosts combat their parasites using mechanisms of resistance and tolerance, which together determine parasite virulence. Environmental factors, including diet, mediate the impact of parasites on hosts, with diet providing nutritional and medicinal properties. Here, we present the first evidence that ongoing environmental change decreases host tolerance and increases parasite virulence through a loss of dietary medicinal quality. Monarch butterflies use dietary toxins (cardenolides) to reduce the deleterious impacts of a protozoan parasite. We fed monarch...

Data from: Evaluating consumptive and nonconsumptive predator effects on prey density using field times series data

, Scott D. Peacor, David B. Bunnell, Henry A. Vanderploeg, Steve A. Pothoven, Ashley K. Elgin, James R. Bence, Jing Jiao, Edward L. Ionides, D.B. Bunnell, J.A. Marino, E.L. Ionides, S.A. Pothoven, A.K. Elgin, H.A. Vanderploeg, S.D. Peacor & J.R. Bence
Determining the degree to which predation affects prey abundance in natural communities constitutes a key goal of ecological research. Predators can affect prey through both consumptive effects (CEs) and nonconsumptive effects (NCEs), although the contributions of each mechanism to the density of prey populations remain largely hypothetical in most systems. Common statistical methods applied to time series data cannot elucidate the mechanisms responsible for hypothesized predator effects on prey density (e.g., differentiate CEs from NCEs),...

Data from: Migratory monarchs that encounter resident monarchs show life-history differences and higher rates of parasite infection

Dara A. Satterfield, John C. Maerz, Mark D. Hunter, D. T. Tyler Flockhart, Keith A. Hobson, D. Ryan Norris, Hillary Streit, Jacobus C. De Roode & Sonia Altizer
Environmental change induces some wildlife populations to shift from migratory to resident behaviours. Newly formed resident populations could influence the health and behaviour of remaining migrants. We investigated migrant-resident interactions among monarch butterflies and consequences for life history and parasitism. Eastern North American monarchs migrate annually to Mexico, but some now breed year-round on exotic milkweed in the southern U.S. and experience high infection prevalence of protozoan parasites. Using stable isotopes (2H, 13C) and cardenolide...

Data from: A robust and tunable mitotic oscillator in artificial cells

Ye Guan, Zhengda Li, Shiyuan Wang, Patrick M Barnes, Xuwen Liu, Haotian Xu, Minjun Jin, Allen P Liu & Qiong Yang
Single-cell analysis is pivotal to deciphering complex phenomena like heterogeneity, bistability, and asynchronous oscillations, where a population ensemble cannot represent individual behaviors. Bulk cell-free systems, despite having unique advantages of manipulation and characterization of biochemical networks, lack the essential single-cell information to understand a class of out-of-steady-state dynamics including cell cycles. Here, by encapsulating Xenopus egg extracts in water-in-oil microemulsions, we developed artificial cells that are adjustable in sizes and periods, sustain mitotic oscillations for...

Data from: Selected HLA-B allotypes are resistant to inhibition or deficiency of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP)

Jie Geng, Anita Zaitouna, Malini Raghavan & Anita J. Zaitouna
Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules present antigenic peptides to CD8+ T cells, and are also important for natural killer (NK) cell immune surveillance against infections and cancers. MHC-I molecules are assembled via a complex assembly pathway in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of cells. Peptides present in the cytosol of cells are transported into the ER via the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). In the ER, peptides are assembled with MHC-I molecules via...

Data from: Ecomorphological and phylogenetic controls on sympatry across extant bats

Jeff J. Shi, Erin P. Westeen, Nathan T. Katlein, Elizabeth R. Dumont & Daniel L. Rabosky
Aim: Macroecological patterns of sympatry can inform our understanding of how ecological and evolutionary processes govern species distributions. Following speciation, both intrinsic and extrinsic factors may determine how readily sympatry occurs. One possibility is that sympatry most readily occurs with ecological divergence, especially if broad-scale co-occurrence is mediated by niche differentiation. Time since divergence may also predict sympatry if hybridization and gene flow lead to the collapse of species boundaries between closely-related taxa. Here, we...

Data from: Microevolutionary processes impact macroevolutionary patterns

Jingchun Li, Jen-Pen Huang, Jeet Sukumaran & L Lacey Knowles
Background: Macroevolutionary modeling of species diversification plays important roles in inferring large-scale biodiversity patterns. It allows estimation of speciation and extinction rates and statistically testing their relationships with different ecological factors. However, macroevolutionary patterns are ultimately generated by microevolutionary processes acting at population levels, especially when speciation and extinction are considered protracted instead of point events. Neglecting the connection between micro- and macroevolution may hinder our ability to fully understand the underlying mechanisms that drive...

Data from: Rates of evolution: a quantitative synthesis

Philip D. Gingerich
One-generation step intervals, differences, and rates; longer base intervals, differences, and rates; and overlapping net intervals, differences, and rates for selection experiments (file 1: 15,431 rates), field studies (file 2: 12,461 rates), and fossil studies (file 3: 47,854 rates).

Data from: A framework for resolving cryptic species: a case study from the lizards of the Australian Wet Tropics

Sonal Singhal, Conrad J. Hoskin, Patrick Couper, Sally Potter & Craig Moritz
As we collect range-wide genetic data for morphologically-defined species, we increasingly unearth evidence for cryptic diversity. Delimiting this cryptic diversity is challenging, both because the divergences span a continuum and because the lack of overt morphological differentiation suggests divergence has proceeded heterogeneously. Here, we address these challenges as we diagnose and describe species in three co-occurring species groups of Australian lizards. By integrating genomic and morphological data with data on hybridization and introgression from contact...

Data from: Developmental shifts in social cognition: socio-emotional biases across the lifespan in rhesus monkeys

Alexandra G. Rosati, Alyssa M. Arre, Michael L. Platt & Laurie R. Santos
Humans exhibit a suite of developmental changes in social cognition across the lifespan. To what extent are these developmental patterns unique? We first review several social domains in which humans undergo critical ontogenetic changes in socio-cognitive processing, including social attention and theory of mind. We then examine whether one human developmental transition—a shift in socioemotional preferences—also occurs in nonhuman primates. Specifically, we experimentally measured socioemotional processing in a large population of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)...

Data from: Social density, but not sex ratio, drives ecdysteroid hormone provisioning to eggs by female house crickets (Acheta domesticus)

Katherine C. Crocker, Mark Hunter & Mark D. Hunter
Social environment profoundly influences the fitness of animals, affecting their probability of survival to adulthood, longevity, and reproductive output. The social conditions experienced by parents at the time of reproduction predict the social environments that offspring will face. Despite clear challenges in predicting future environmental conditions, adaptive maternal effects provide a mechanism of passing environmental information from parent to offspring, and are now considered pervasive in natural systems. Maternal effects have been widely studied in...

Data from: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi mediate herbivore-induction of plant defenses differently above and belowground

Amanda R. Meier & Mark D. Hunter
Plants are exposed to herbivores and symbionts above and belowground. Herbivores aboveground alter plant defenses in both leaves and roots, affecting plant-herbivore interactions above and belowground. Root symbionts, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), also influence the defenses of leaves and roots, and alter plant responses to herbivory. However, we lack an understanding of how AMF mediate plant responses to herbivores simultaneously in above and belowground plant tissues, despite the ubiquity of such interactions and...

Data from: The effects of milkweed induced defense on parasite resistance in monarch butterflies, Danaus plexippus

Wen-Hao Tan, Leiling Tao, Kevin M. Hoang, Mark D. Hunter & Jacobus C. De Roode
Many plants express induced defenses against herbivores through increasing the production of toxic secondary chemicals following damage. Phytochemical induction can directly or indirectly affect other organisms within the community. In tri-trophic systems, increased concentrations of plant toxins could be detrimental to plants if herbivores can sequester these toxins as protective chemicals for themselves. Thus, through trophic interactions, induction can lead to either positive or negative effects on plant fitness. We examined the effects of milkweed...

Data from: Sex-dependent differences in central artery hemodynamics in normal and fibulin-5 deficient mice: implications for ageing

Federica Cuomo, Jacopo Ferruzzi, Pradyumn Agarwal, Chen Li, Zhen W. Zhuang, Jay D. Humphrey & C. Alberto Figueroa
Mouse models provide unique opportunities to study vascular disease, but they demand increased experimental and computational resolution. We describe a workflow for combining in vivo and in vitro biomechanical data to build mouse-specific computational models of the central vasculature including regional variations in biaxial wall stiffness, thickness and perivascular support. These fluid–solid interaction models are informed by micro-computed tomography imaging and in vivo ultrasound and pressure measurements, and include mouse-specific inflow and outflow boundary conditions....

Data from: Clade-limited colonization in brood parasitic finches (Vidua spp.)

Michael D. Sorenson, Christopher N. Balakrishnan & Robert B. Payne
The African brood parasitic finches (Vidua spp.) are host specialists that mimic the songs and nestling mouth markings of their finch hosts (family Estrildidae). Although recent molecular analyses suggest rapid speciation associated with host switches in some members of this group, the association of different Vidua lineages with particular host genera suggests the possibility of cospeciation at higher levels in the host and parasite phylogenies. We compared a phylogeny of all Vidua species with a...

Data from: Tangled banks: a landscape genomic evaluation of wallace's riverine barrier hypothesis for three amazon plant species

Alison G. Nazareno, Christopher W. Dick & Lúcia G. Lohmann
Wallace’s Riverine Barrier hypotheses is one of the earliest biogeographic explanations for Amazon speciation, but it has rarely been tested in plants. In this study, we used three woody Amazonian plant species to evaluate Wallace’s Hypothesis using tools of landscape genomics. We generated unlinked single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from the nuclear genomes of 234 individuals (78 for each plant species) across 13 sampling sites along the Rio Branco, Brazil, for Amphirrhox longifolia (8,075 SNPs), Psychotria...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    66

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    66

Affiliations

  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    66
  • Yale University
    5
  • University of Arizona
    4
  • University of Pennsylvania
    3
  • Stanford University
    3
  • National Autonomous University of Mexico
    3
  • University of Sao Paulo
    3
  • Emory University
    3
  • Rice University
    2
  • University of Washington
    2