20 Works

Data from: The use and utility of surrogates in biodiversity monitoring programmes

Chloe F. Sato, Martin J. Westgate, Philip S. Barton, Claire N. Foster, Luke S. O'Loughlin, Jennifer C. Pierson, Jayne Balmer, Jane Chapman, Gareth Catt, Tanya Detto, Amy Hawcroft, Rodney Kavanagh, Deanna Marshall, Meredith McKay, Katherine Moseby, Mike Perry, Doug Robinson, Mellesa Schroder, Katherine Tuft & David B. Lindenmayer
Monitoring programmes are intended to inform effective biodiversity conservation and management (Legge et al. 2018). Well‐designed programmes can establish baseline conditions, determine trends in threatened species populations, quantify the effects of management, and provide warning of ecosystem changes (Magurran et al. 2010). For these reasons, biodiversity monitoring underpins the activities of land management agencies worldwide. However, it is not always possible to directly monitor key variables at ideal spatio‐temporal resolutions, due to resourcing or logistic...

Data from: Genetic diversity and population structure of the threatened freshwater catfish, Tandanus tandanus, in Victoria, Australia

Erin Hill, Brett A. Ingram, Meaghan Rourke, John Mitchell & Jan M. Strugnell
In Australia, many species of freshwater fish have rapidly declined following European settlement in the late eighteenth century. The freshwater catfish (Tandanus tandanus) is listed as threatened in Victoria and accordingly, broodstock management and a captive breeding program to facilitate the reintroduction of hatchery bred fish into depleted populations have been suggested. Little work has been conducted on Victorian populations of T. tandanus, despite its threatened status. This study assessed the genetic diversity and genetic...

Data from: Identifying environmental correlates of intraspecific genetic variation

Katherine A. Harrisson, Jian D. L. Yen, Alexandra Pavlova, Meaghan L. Rourke, Dean Gilligan, Brett A. Ingram, Jarod Lyon, Zeb Tonkin & Paul Sunnucks
Genetic variation is critical to the persistence of populations and their capacity to adapt to environmental change. The distribution of genetic variation across a species' range can reveal critical information that is not necessarily represented in species occurrence or abundance patterns. We identified environmental factors associated with the amount of intraspecific, individual-based genetic variation across the range of a widespread freshwater fish species, the Murray cod Maccullochella peelii. We used two different approaches to statistically...

Data from: Genetic diversity and drivers of dwarfism in extinct island emu populations

Vicki A. Thomson, Kieren J. Mitchell, Rolan Eberhard, Joe Dortch, Jeremy J. Austin & Alan Cooper
Australia’s iconic emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae novaehollandiae) is the only living representative of its genus, but fossil evidence and reports from early European explorers suggest that three island forms (at least two of which were dwarfs) became extinct during the 19th century. While one of these - the King Island emu - has been found to be conspecific with Australian mainland emus, little is known about how the other two forms - Kangaroo Island and Tasmanian...

Data from: Signatures of polygenic adaptation associated with climate across the range of a threatened fish species with high genetic connectivity

Katherine A. Harrisson, Stephen J. Amish, Alexandra Pavlova, Shawn R. Narum, Marina Telonis-Scott, Meaghan L. Rourke, Jarod Lyon, Zeb Tonkin, Dean M. Gilligan, Brett A. Ingram, Mark Lintermans, Han Ming Gan, Christopher M. Austin, Gordon Luikart & Paul Sunnucks
Adaptive differences across species’ ranges can have important implications for population persistence and conservation management decisions. Despite advances in genomic technologies, detecting adaptive variation in natural populations remains challenging. Key challenges in gene-environment association studies involve distinguishing the effects of drift from those of selection, and identifying subtle signatures of polygenic adaptation. We used paired-end restriction-site associated-DNA sequencing data (6605 biallelic single nucleotide polymorphisms; SNPs) to examine population structure and test for signatures of adaptation...

Data from: A high-resolution panorama camera system for monitoring colony-wide seabird nesting behaviour

Tim P. Lynch, Racheal Alderman, Alistair J. Hobday & Rachael Alderman
1. Obtaining accurate and representative demographic metrics for animal populations is critical to many aspects of wildlife monitoring and management. However, at remote animal colonies, metrics derived from sequential counts or other continuous monitoring are often subject to logistical, weather and disturbance challenges.The development of remote camera technologies has assisted monitoring, but limitations in spatial and temporal resolution and sample sizes remain. 2. Here we describe the application of a robotic camera system (Gigapan) which...

Data from: Cultural traditions across a migratory network shape the genetic structure of southern right whales around Australia and New Zealand

E. L. Carroll, C. S. Baker, M. Watson, R. Alderman, J. Bannister, O. E. Gaggiotti, D. R. Gröcke, N. Patenaude & R. Harcourt
Fidelity to migratory destinations is an important driver of connectivity in marine and avian species. Here we assess the role of maternally directed learning of migratory habitats, or migratory culture, on the population structure of the endangered Australian and New Zealand southern right whale. Using DNA profiles, comprising mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes (500 bp), microsatellite genotypes (17 loci) and sex from 128 individually-identified whales, we find significant differentiation among winter calving grounds based on both...

Data from: Current and projected global distribution of Phytophthora cinnamomi, one of the world’s worst plant pathogens

Treena Burgess, John K. Scott, Keith L. McDougall, Michael J. C. Stukely, Colin Crane, William A. Dunstan, Frances Brigg, Vera Andjic, Diane White, Tim Rudman, Frans Arentz, Noboru Ota, Giles E. St.J. Hardy, Treena I. Burgess & Giles E. St. J. Hardy
Globally, Phytophthora cinnamomi is listed as one of the 100 worst invasive alien species and active management is required to reduce impact and prevent spread in both horticulture and natural ecosystems. Conversely, there are regions thought to be suitable for the pathogen where no disease is observed. We developed a CLIMEX model for the global distribution of P. cinnamomi based on the pathogen's response to temperature and moisture and by incorporating extensive empirical evidence on...

Data from: The cascading pathogenic consequences of Sarcoptes scabiei infection that manifest in host disease

Alynn M. Martin, Tamieka A. Fraser, John A. Lesku, Kellie Simpson, Georgia L. Roberts, Jillian Garvey, Adam Polkinghorne, Christopher P. Burridge & Scott Carver
Sarcoptic mange, caused by the parasitic mite Sarcoptes scabiei, causes a substantive burden of disease to humans, domestic animals, and wildlife, globally. There are many effects of S. scabiei infection, culminating in the disease which hosts suffer. However, major knowledge gaps remain on the pathogenic impacts of this infection. Here, we focus on the bare-nosed wombat host (Vombatus ursinus) to investigate the effects of mange on: (i) host heat loss and thermoregulation, (ii) field metabolic...

Data from: Population genetic signatures of a climate change driven marine range extension

Jorge E. Ramos, Gretta T. Pecl, Natalie A. Moltschaniwskyj, Jayson M. Semmens, Carla A. Souza & Jan M. Strugnell
Shifts in species distribution, or ‘range shifts’, are one of the most commonly documented responses to ocean warming, with important consequences for the function and structure of ecosystems, and for socio-economic activities. Understanding the genetic signatures of range shifts can help build our knowledge of the capacity of species to establish and persist in colonised areas. Here, seven microsatellite loci were used to examine the population connectivity, genetic structure and diversity of Octopus tetricus, which...

Data from: Foraging by an avian ecosystem engineer extensively modifies the litter and soil layer in forest ecosystems

Alex Maisey, Angie Haslem, Steven Leonard & Andrew Bennett
Ecosystem engineers physically modify their environment, thereby altering habitats for other organisms. Increasingly, ‘engineers’ are recognised as an important focus for conservation and ecological restoration because their actions affect a range of ecosystem processes and thereby influence how ecosystems function. The superb lyrebird Menura novaehollandiae is proposed as an ecosystem engineer in forests of south-eastern Australia due to the volume of soil and litter it turns over when foraging. We measured the seasonal and spatial...

Data from: Tracing the rise of malignant cell lines: distribution, epidemiology and evolutionary interactions of two transmissible cancers in Tasmanian devils

Samantha James, Geordie Jennings, Young Mi Kwon, Maximilian Stammnitz, Alexandra Fraik, Andrew Storfer, Sebastien Comte, David Pemberton, Samantha Fox, Bill Brown, Ruth Pye, Gregory Woods, Bruce Lyons, Paul Hohenlohe, Hamish McCallum, Hannah V. Siddle, Frederic Thomas, Beata Ujvari, Elizabeth P. Murchison, Menna Jones & Rodrigo Hamede
Emerging infectious diseases are rising globally and understanding host-pathogen interactions during the initial stages of disease emergence is essential for assessing potential evolutionary dynamics and designing novel management strategies. Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) are endangered due to a transmissible cancer – devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) – that since its emergence in the 1990’s, has affected most populations throughout Tasmania. Recent studies suggest that devils are adapting to the DFTD epidemic and that disease-induced extinction...

Data from: Chemical suppression of embryonic cane toads Rhinella marina by larval conspecifics

Gregory S. Clarke, Michael R. Crossland, Cathy Shilton & Richard Shine
1. Mechanisms that evolved to suppress the development of potential competitors may offer novel methods for species-specific control of invasive organisms. The tadpoles of cane toads Rhinella marina compete for limited food resources in small ponds, and older tadpoles eliminate competitors not only by eating newly-laid eggs, but also by releasing a chemical that suppresses development of conspecific eggs. 2. We conducted laboratory trials to assess the magnitude and generality of this suppression effect, and...

Data from: Density trends and demographic signals uncover the long-term impact of transmissible cancer in Tasmanian Devils

Billie T. Lazenby, Mathias W. Tobler, William E. Brown, Clare E. Hawkins, Greg J. Hocking, Fiona Hume, Stewart Huxtable, Philip Iles, Menna E. Jones, Clare Lawrence, Sam Thalmann, Phil Wise, Howel Williams, Samantha Fox & David Pemberton
Monitoring the response of wild mammal populations to threatening processes is fundamental to effective conservation management. This is especially true for infectious diseases, which may have dynamic and therefore unpredictable interactions with their host. We investigate the long-term impact of a transmissible cancer, devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), on the endemic Tasmanian devil. We analyse trends in devil spotlight counts and density across the area impacted by the disease. We investigate the demographic parameters which...

Data from: Environmental DNA metabarcoding studies are critically affected by substrate selection

Adam Koziol, Michael Stat, Tiffany Simpson, Simon Jarman, Joseph D. DiBattista, Euan S. Harvey, Michael Marnane, Justin McDonald & Michael Bunce
Effective biomonitoring is critical for driving management outcomes that ensure long-term sustainability of the marine environment. In recent years environmental DNA (eDNA), coupled with metabarcoding methodologies, has emerged as a promising tool for generating biotic surveys of marine ecosystems, including those under anthropogenic pressure. However, more empirical data is needed on how to best implement eDNA field sampling approaches to maximise their utility for each specific application. The effect of the substrate chosen for eDNA...

Data from: Anthropogenic selection enhances cancer evolution in Tasmanian devil tumours

Beata Ujvari, Anne-Maree Pearse, Kate Swift, Pamela Hodson, Bobby Hua, Stephen Pyecroft, Robyn Taylor, Rodrigo Hamede, Menna Jones, Kathy Belov, Thomas Madsen & Katherine Belov
The Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD) provides a unique opportunity to elucidate the long-term effects of natural and anthropogenic selection on cancer evolution. Since first observed in 1996, this transmissible cancer has caused local population declines by >90%. So far, four chromosomal DFTD variants (strains) have been described and karyotypic analyses of 253 tumours showed higher levels of tetraploidy in the oldest strain. We propose that increased ploidy in the oldest strain may have...

Data from: Incorporating non-equilibrium dynamics into demographic history inferences of a migratory marine species

Emma L. Carroll, Rachael Alderman, John L. Bannister, Martine Bérubé, Peter B. Best, Laura Boren, C. Scott Baker, Rochelle Constantine, Ken Findlay, Robert Harcourt, Louisiane Lemaire, Per J. Palsbøll, Nathalie J. Patenaude, Victoria J. Rowntree, Jon Seger, Debbie Steel, Luciano O. Valenzuela, Mandy Watson & Oscar E. Gaggiotti
Understanding how dispersal and gene flow link geographically separated populations over evolutionary history is challenging, particularly in migratory marine species. In southern right whales (SRWs, Eubalaena australis), patterns of genetic diversity are likely influenced by the glacial climate cycle and recent history of whaling. Here we use a dataset of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences (n=1,327) and nuclear markers (17 microsatellite loci, n=222) from major wintering grounds to investigate circumpolar population structure, historical demography, and effective...

Data from: Evolutionary factors affecting the cross-species utility of newly developed microsatellite markers in seabirds

Yoshan Moodley, Juan F. Masello, Gopi K. Munimanda, Theresa L. Cole, Marco R. Thali, Rachael Alderman, Richard J. Cuthbert, Manuel Marin, Melanie Massaro, Joan Navarro, Richard A. Phillips, Peter G. Ryan, Cristián G. Suazo, Yves Cherel, Henri Weimerskirch, Petra Quillfeldt & Luciano Calderon
Microsatellite loci are ideal for testing hypotheses relating to genetic segregation at fine spatio-temporal scales. They are also conserved among closely related species, making them potentially useful for clarifying interspecific relationships between recently diverged taxa. However, mutations at primer binding sites may lead to increased nonamplification, or disruptions that may result in decreased polymorphism in nontarget species. Furthermore, high mutation rates and constraints on allele size may also with evolutionary time, promote an increase in...

Data from: Future climate change is predicted to affect the microbiome and condition of habitat-forming kelp

Zhiguang Qiu, Melinda A Coleman, Euan Provost, Alexandra H Campbell, Brendan P Kelaher, Steven J Dalton, Torsten Thomas, Peter D Steinberg & Ezequiel M Marzinelli
Climate change is driving global declines of marine habitat-forming species through physiological effects and through changes to ecological interactions, with projected trajectories for oceanwarming and acidification likely to exacerbate such impacts in coming decades. Interactions between habitat-formers and their microbiomes are fundamental for host functioning and resilience, but how such relationships will change in future conditions is largely unknown. We investigated independent and interactive effects of warming and acidification on a large brown seaweed, the...

Spatially exlicit capture histories for small mammals and predators in a Tasmanian forest system

Billie Lazenby, Nicholas Mooney & Christopher Dickman
The following data represents three years of capture-recapure records from individually marked co-occurring small mammals and predators from four spatially independent sites situated in cool temperate forests in southern Tasmania, Australia. Data for small mammals was collected for the swamp rat, Rattus lutreolus, and long-tailed mouse, Pseudomys higginsi, using Elliott small mammal live capture and release traps. Data for predators was collected for the Tasmanian devil, Sarcophilus harrisii, and feral cat, Felis catus, using remote...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    1
  • 2020
    1
  • 2019
    3
  • 2018
    5
  • 2017
    2
  • 2016
    2
  • 2015
    4
  • 2014
    1
  • 2013
    1

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    20

Affiliations

  • Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment
    20
  • La Trobe University
    6
  • University of Tasmania
    5
  • Macquarie University
    3
  • University of Sydney
    3
  • University of Western Australia
    3
  • University of Adelaide
    2
  • Western Australian Museum
    2
  • Monash University
    2
  • Deakin University
    2