16 Works

Data from: Microevolutionary processes impact macroevolutionary patterns

Jingchun Li, Jen-Pen Huang, Jeet Sukumaran & L Lacey Knowles
Background: Macroevolutionary modeling of species diversification plays important roles in inferring large-scale biodiversity patterns. It allows estimation of speciation and extinction rates and statistically testing their relationships with different ecological factors. However, macroevolutionary patterns are ultimately generated by microevolutionary processes acting at population levels, especially when speciation and extinction are considered protracted instead of point events. Neglecting the connection between micro- and macroevolution may hinder our ability to fully understand the underlying mechanisms that drive...

Data from: The spatial structure of phylogenetic and functional diversity in the United States and Canada: an example using the sedge family (Cyperaceae)

Daniel Spalink, Jocelyn Pender, Marcial Escudero, Andrew L. Hipp, Eric H. Roalson, Julian R. Starr, Marcia J. Waterway, Lynn Bohs & Kenneth J. Sytsma
Systematically quantifying diversity across landscapes is necessary to understand how clade history and ecological heterogeneity contribute to the origin, distribution, and maintenance of biodiversity. Here, we chart the spatial structure of diversity among all species in the sedge family (Cyperaceae) throughout the USA and Canada. We first identify areas of remarkable species richness, phylogenetic diversity, and functional trait diversity, and highlight regions of conservation priority. We then test predictions about the spatial structure of this...

Data from: Step-wise evolution of complex chemical defenses in millipedes: a phylogenomic approach

Juanita Rodriguez, Tappey H. Jones, Petra Sierwald, Paul E. Marek, William A. Shear, Michael S. Brewer, Kevin M. Kocot & Jason E. Bond
With fossil representatives from the Silurian capable of respiring atmospheric oxygen, millipedes are among the oldest terrestrial animals, and likely the first to acquire diverse and complex chemical defenses against predators. Exploring the origin of complex adaptive traits is critical for understanding the evolution of Earth’s biological complexity, and chemical defense evolution serves as an ideal study system. The classic explanation for the evolution of complexity is by gradual increase from simple to complex, passing...

Data from: Biogeography of Leptospira in wild animal communities inhabiting the insular ecosystem of the western Indian Ocean islands and neighboring Africa

Muriel Dietrich, Yann Gomard, Erwan Lagadec, Beza Ramasindrazana, Gildas Le Minter, Vanina Guernier, Aude Benlali, Gérard Rocamora, Wanda Markotter, Steve M. Goodman, Koussay Dellagi, Pablo Tortosa & Steven M. Goodman
Understanding the processes driving parasite assemblages is particularly important in the context of zoonotic infectious diseases. Leptospirosis is a widespread zoonotic bacterial infection caused by pathogenic species of the genus Leptospira. Despite a wide range of animal hosts, information is still lacking on the factors shaping Leptospira diversity in wild animal communities, especially in regions, such as tropical insular ecosystems, with high host species richness and complex biogeographical patterns. Using a large dataset (34 mammal...

Data from: Hidden diversity of African yellow house bats (Vespertilionidae, Scotophilus): insights from multilocus phylogenetics and lineage delimitation

Terrence C. Demos, Paul W. Webala, Michael Bartonjo & Bruce D. Patterson
The genus Scotophilus contains 21 currently recognized species ranging throughout Africa and Southeast Asia. Among the 13 species recognized from continental Africa, systematic relationships remain poorly understood. Taxonomic uncertainty regarding names, suggestions of polytypic species complexes, and undescribed cryptic diversity all contribute to the current confusion. To gain insights into the systematics of this group, we inferred single locus and multi-locus phylogenies and conducted lineage delimitation analyses using seven unlinked genes for specimens from across...

Data from: Moving in the Anthropocene: global reductions in terrestrial mammalian movements

Marlee A. Tucker, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, William F. Fagan, John M. Fryxell, Bram Van Moorter, Susan C. Alberts, Abdullahi H. Ali, Andrew M. Allen, Nina Attias, Tal Avgar, Hattie Bartlam-Brooks, Buuveibaatar Bayarbaatar, Jerrold L. Belant, Alessandra Bertassoni, Dean Beyer, Laura Bidner, Floris M. Van Beest, Stephen Blake, Niels Blaum, Chloe Bracis, Danielle Brown, P. J. Nico De Bruyn, Francesca Cagnacci, Justin M. Calabrese, Constança Camilo-Alves … & Thomas Mueller
Animal movement is fundamental for ecosystem functioning and species survival, yet the effects of the anthropogenic footprint on animal movements have not been estimated across species. Using a unique GPS-tracking database of 803 individuals across 57 species, we found that movements of mammals in areas with a comparatively high human footprint were on average one-half to one-third the extent of their movements in areas with a low human footprint. We attribute this reduction to behavioral...

Data from: Tracing the diversification history of a Neogene rodent invasion into South America

Renan Maestri, Nathan S. Upham & Bruce D. Patterson
We investigated spatial patterns of evolutionary relatedness and diversification rates to test hypotheses about the historical biogeographic processes underlying the radiation of Neotropical rats and mice (Sigmodontinae, ~400 species). A negative correlation between mean phylogenetic distance and diversification rates of rodent assemblages reveals a pattern of species co-occurrence in which assemblages of closely related species are also the fastest diversifying ones. Subregions of the Neotropics occupied by distantly related species that are on average more...

Data from: The evolution of the dicynodont sacrum: constraint and innovation in the synapsid axial column

Christopher T. Griffin & Kenneth D. Angielczyk
Constraint is a universal feature of morphological evolution. The vertebral column of synapsids (mammals and their close relatives) is a classic example of this phenotypic restriction, with greatly reduced variation in the number of vertebrae compared to the sauropsid lineage. Synapsids generally possess only three sacral vertebrae, which articulate with the ilium and play a key role in locomotion. Dicynodont anomodonts are the exception to this rule, possessing seven or more sacral vertebrae while reaching...

Data from: A comprehensive analysis of autocorrelation and bias in home range estimation

Michael J. Noonan, Marlee A. Tucker, Christen H. Fleming, Tom S. Akre, Susan C. Alberts, Abdullahi H. Ali, Jeanne Altmann, Pamela C. Antunes, Jerrold L. Belant, Dean Beyer, Niels Blaum, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, , Rogerio De Paula Cunha, Jasja Dekker, Jonathan Drescher-Lehman, Nina Farwig, Claudia Fichtel, Christina Fischer, Adam T. Ford, Jacob R. Goheen, René Janssen, Florian Jeltsch, Matthew Kauffman, Peter M. Kappeler … & Justin M. Calabrese
Home range estimation is routine practice in ecological research. While advances in animal tracking technology have increased our capacity to collect data to support home range analysis, these same advances have also resulted in increasingly autocorrelated data. Consequently, the question of which home range estimator to use on modern, highly autocorrelated tracking data remains open. This question is particularly relevant given that most estimators assume independently sampled data. Here, we provide a comprehensive evaluation of...

Data from: The role of diversification in the continental scale community assembly of the American oaks (Quercus)

Jeannine Cavender-Bares, Shan Kothari, José Eduardo Meireles, Matthew A. Kaproth, Paul S. Manos & Andrew L. Hipp
Premise of the study: Evolutionary and biogeographic history, including past environmental change and diversification processes, are likely to have influenced the expansion, migration, and extinction of populations, creating evolutionary legacy effects that influence regional species pools and the composition of communities. We consider the consequences of the diversification process in shaping trait evolution and assembly of oak-dominated communities throughout the continental U.S. Methods: Within the US oaks, we tested for phylogenetic and functional trait patterns...

Data from: Adaptation and constraint in the evolution of the mammalian backbone

Katrina E. Jones, Lorena Benitez, Kenneth D. Angielczyk & Stephanie E. Pierce
Background: The axial skeleton consists of repeating units (vertebrae) that are integrated through their development and evolution. Unlike most tetrapods, vertebrae in the mammalian trunk are subdivided into distinct thoracic and lumbar modules, resulting in a system that is constrained in terms of count but highly variable in morphology. This study asks how thoracolumbar regionalization has impacted adaptation and evolvability across mammals. Using geometric morphometrics, we examine evolutionary patterns in five vertebral positions from diverse...

Data from: Diversification rates of the “Old Endemic” murine rodents of Luzon Island, Philippines are inconsistent with incumbency effects and ecological opportunity

Dakota Michael Rowsey, Lawrence R. Heaney & Sharon A. Jansa
Diversity-dependent cladogenesis occurs when a colonizing lineage exhibits increasing interspecific competition as it ecologically diversifies. Repeated colonization of a region by closely related taxa may cause similar effects as species within each lineage compete with one another. This may be particularly relevant for secondary colonists, which could experience limited diversification due to competition with earlier, incumbent colonists over evolutionary time. We tested the hypothesis that an incumbent lineage may diminish the diversification of secondary colonists...

Data from: Dietary specialization in mutualistic acacia-ants affects relative abundance but not identity of host-associated bacteria

Benjamin E. R. Rubin, Stefanie Kautz, Brian D. Wray & Corrie S. Moreau
Acacia-ant mutualists in the genus Pseudomyrmex nest obligately in acacia plants and, as we show through stable isotope analysis, feed at a remarkably low trophic level. Insects with diets such as these sometimes depend on bacterial symbionts for nutritional enrichment. We, therefore, examine the bacterial communities associated with acacia-ants in order to determine whether they host bacterial partners likely to contribute to their nutrition. Despite large differences in trophic position, acacia-ants and related species with...

Data from: Fossils reveal the complex evolutionary history of the mammalian regionalized spine

Katrina Elizabeth Jones, K. D. Angielczyk, P. D. Polly, J. J. Head, V. Fernandez, J. K. Lungmus, S. Tulga & S. E. Pierce
A unique characteristic of mammals is a vertebral column with anatomically distinct regions, but when and how this trait evolved remains unknown. Here we reconstruct vertebral regions and their morphological disparity in the extinct forerunners of mammals, the non-mammalian synapsids, to elucidate the evolution of mammalian axial differentiation. Mapping patterns of regionalization and disparity (heterogeneity) across amniotes reveals that both traits increased during synapsid evolution. However, the onset of regionalization predates increased heterogeneity. Based on...

Tree species abundance through time in tropical forest census plots, Panama

Richard Condit, Rolando Pérez, Salomón Aguilar, Suzanne Lao, Foster Robin & Stephen Hubbell
All trees at least 1 cm diameter at breast height were censused in three sites in Panama. The Barro Colorado plot is 50 hectares in area and was fully censused on eight occasions between 1982 and 2015. The Sherman plot is 5.96 hectares and was fully censuses four times between 1996 and 2009. The Cocoli plot is 4 hectares and was censused three times between 1994 and 1999. The three accompanying tables give the population...

Data from: Ant-plant interactions evolved through increasing interdependence

Matthew P. Nelsen, Richard H. Ree & Corrie S. Moreau
Ant–plant interactions are diverse and abundant and include classic models in the study of mutualism and other biotic interactions. By estimating a time-scaled phylogeny of more than 1,700 ant species and a time-scaled phylogeny of more than 10,000 plant genera, we infer when and how interactions between ants and plants evolved and assess their macroevolutionary consequences. We estimate that ant–plant interactions originated in the Mesozoic, when predatory, ground-inhabiting ants first began foraging arboreally. This served...

Registration Year

  • 2018
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Field Museum of Natural History
    16
  • Duke University
    3
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    2
  • University of Pretoria
    2
  • Princeton University
    2
  • Michigan Department of Natural Resources
    2
  • Senckenberg Nature Research Society
    2
  • University of Wyoming
    2
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • Virginia Tech
    2