12 Works

Potential for powered flight neared by most close avialan relatives but few crossed its thresholds

Rui Pei, Michael Pittman, Pablo A. Goloboff, T. Alexander Dececchi, Michael B. Habib, Thomas G. Kaye, Hans C.E. Larsson, Mark A. Norell, Stephen L. Brusatte & Xing Xu
This dataset is the Supplementary Materials of the Pei, Pittman et al. (2020) study 'Potential for powered flight neared by most close avialan relatives but few crossed its thresholds' in Current Biology (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2020.06.105). In this study, a revised phylogeny of coelurosaurian theropod dinosaurs was used to reconstruct their potential for powered flight. It found that powered flight potential evolved at least three times (once in birds and twice in dromaeosaurids) and that many ancestors of...

Histological dataset for: Osteohistological analyses reveal diverse strategies of theropod dinosaur body-size macroevolution

Thomas Cullen, Juan Canale, Sebastián Apesteguía, Nathan Smith, Dongyu Hu & Peter Makovicky
The independent evolution of gigantism among dinosaurs has been a topic of longstanding interest, but it remains unclear if gigantic theropods, the largest bipeds in the fossil record, all achieved massive sizes in the same manner, or through different strategies. We perform multi-element histological analyses on a phylogenetically broad dataset sampled from eight theropod families, with a focus on gigantic tyrannosaurids and carcharodontosaurids, to reconstruct the growth strategies of these lineages and test if particular...

Data from: Palaeobiogeography of the north pacific toothed mysticetes (Cetacea, Aetiocetidae): a key to Oligocene cetacean distributional patterns

Atzcalli Ehécatl Hernández Cisneros & Jorge Velez Juarbe
Biogeographical distributional patterns of cetaceans reflect dispersal events and colonization of the oceans from their ancestral area in the ancient Sea of Tethys ~53 Ma. Likewise, they shows several vicariance events throughout the evolutionary history of this group. However, our understanding of how these processes took place and what biogeographical scenarios occurred among the different groups of cetaceans through time, is limited. Consequently, this work focuses on explaining the distributional patterns of the well-known North...

Data from: Nasal compartmentalization in Kogiidae (Cetacea, Physeteroidea): Insights from a new late Miocene dwarf sperm whale from the Pisco Formation

Aldo Benites-Palomino, Jorge Velez-Juarbe, Alberto Collareta, Diana Ochoa, Ali Altamirano, Matthieu Carré, Manuel J. Laime, Mario Urbina & Rodolfo Salas-Gismondi
Facial compartmentalization in the skull of extant pygmy whales (Kogiidae) is a unique feature among cetaceans that allows the housing of a wide array of organs responsible for echolocation. Recent fossil findings depict a remarkable disparity of the facial bone organization in Miocene kogiids, but the significance of such a rearrangement for the evolution of the clade has been barely explored. Here we describe Kogia danomurai sp. nov., a late Miocene (ca. 5.8 Ma) taxon...

Data from: eDNA metabarcoding bioassessment of endangered fairy shrimp (Branchinecta spp.) - Part B

Zachary Gold, Adam R. Wall, Emily E. Curd, Ryan P. Kelly, N. Dean Pentcheff, Lee Ripma, Paul H. Barber & Regina Wetzer
Fairy shrimp are integral components of vernal pool ecosystems, providing key food resources for migratory birds and amphibians. However, habitat degradation and land use change severely threaten the health of both vernal pools and the survival of fairy shrimp species. Branchinecta sandiegonensis Fugate, 1993 has been particularly affected by urban and agricultural development in its small native range within San Diego County, California, USA. It is listed as an endangered species under federal laws and...

Identification of Megaselia (Diptera: Phoridae) species using wing vein landmarking

Brian Brown & Maria Wong
A semi-automated identification system using wing venation is described for the large, taxonomically challenging genus Megaselia Rondani (Diptera: Phoridae). Wing photographs make two-dimensional images that can be landmarked and analyzed to produce transformed (standardized) x-y coordinates, and are well-suited for a semi-automated approach. We landmarked wing photographs of individuals of 108 specimens of Megaselia from the ZADBI (Zurqui All Diptera Biodiversity Inventory) project, as well as 284 specimens of Megaselia from the Los Angeles based...

Data from: eDNA metabarcoding bioassessment of endangered fairy shrimp (Branchinecta spp.) - Part A

Zachary Gold, Adam Wall, Paul Barber, Emily Curd, N. Dean Pentcheff, Lee Ripma & Regina Wetzer
Fairy shrimp are integral components of vernal pool ecosystems, providing key food resources for migratory birds and amphibians. However, habitat degradation and land use change severely threaten the health of both vernal pools and the survival of fairy shrimp species. Branchinecta sandiegonensis has been particularly affected by urban and agricultural development in its small native range within San Diego County, California, USA. It is listed as an endangered species under both state and federal laws...

Distinguishing between dispersal and vicariance: A novel approach using anti-tropical taxa across the fish Tree of Life

William Ludt & Corinne Myers
Aim: Anti-tropical taxa are species split by the tropics into disjunct northern and southern populations. These distributions occur throughout the Tree of Life, but the mechanisms proposed to drive this pattern are debated and generally fit into two categories: dispersal and vicariance. Here we quantitatively test the prevalence of dispersal and vicariance as plausible drivers of anti-tropical marine distributions using intra-specific anti-tropical marine fishes as a model system. Location: Primarily Indo-Pacific. Major Taxa Studied: Marine...

Spatial point pattern analysis of traces (SPPAT): an approach for visualizing and quantifying site-selectivity patterns of drilling predators

Alexis Rojas, Gregory Dietl, Michal Kowalewski, Roger W. Portell, Austin Hendy & Jason Blackburn
Site-selectivity analysis in drilling predation may provide useful behavioral information of a predator interacting with its prey. However, traditional approaches exclude some spatial information (i.e., oversimplified trace position) and are dependent on the scale of analysis (e.g., arbitrary grid system used to divide the prey skeleton into sectors). Here we introduce the spatial point pattern analysis of traces (SPPAT), an approach for visualizing and quantifying the distribution of traces on shelled invertebrate prey, which includes...

Local and landscape scale variables shape insect diversity in an urban biodiversity hotspot.

Benjamin Adams, Enjie Li, Christine Bahlai, Emily Meineke, Terrence McGlynn & Brian Brown
Local community structure is shaped by processes acting at local and landscape scales. The relative importance of drivers operating across different spatial scales are difficult to test without observations across regional or latitudinal gradients. Cities exhibit strong but predictable environmental gradients overlaying a mosaic of highly variable but repeated habitat types within a constrained area. Thus, cities present a unique opportunity to explore how both local and landscape factors influence local biotic communities. We used...

The limits of convergence: the roles of phylogeny and dietary ecology in shaping non-avian amniote skulls

Keegan Melstrom, Kenneth Angielczyk, Kathleen Ritterbush & Randall Irmis
Cranial morphology is remarkably varied in living amniotes, ranging from short-faced mammals to the elongate snouts of crocodylians. This diversity of shapes is thought to correspond with feeding ecology, a relationship repeatedly demonstrated at smaller phylogenetic scales, but one that remains untested across amniote phylogeny. Using a combination of 2D geometric and linear morphometrics, we investigate the links between phylogenetic relationships, diet, and skull shape in an expansive dataset of extant amniotes with teeth: mammals,...

Description of two new species of Paraonidae (Annelida) from the Gulf of Thailand, Western Pacific

Jintana Plathong, Pablo Hernández-Alcántara, Leslie Harris & Sakanan Plathong
Two new species of Aricidea Webster, 1879 (Paraonidae), Aricidea (Acmira) anusakdii sp. nov. and Aricidea (Aricidea) thammapinanae sp. nov. were collected from 10–26.5 m depth, in shallow soft bottoms with mud mixed with sand and shell substrates at Songkhla Sea, the Gulf of Thailand between 2011–2018. Aricidea (Acmira) anusakdii sp. nov. is clearly distinguished from other species of the subgenus Acmira by having a rounded bilobed prostomium divided by a slight notch on the anterior...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    12

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
    12
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    2
  • San Diego State University
    2
  • University of California Los Angeles
    2
  • Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • Mount Marty College
    1
  • University of Minnesota
    1
  • University of Edinburgh
    1
  • Los Angeles Mission College
    1