216 Works

Data from: Genome-wide evidence reveals that African and Eurasian Golden Jackals are distinct species

Klaus-Peter Koepfli, John Pollinger, Raquel Godinho, Jacqueline Robinson, Amanda Lea, Sarah Hendricks, Rena M. Schweizer, Olaf Thalmann, Pedro Silva, Zhenxin Fan, Andrey A. Yurchenko, Pavel Dobrynin, Alexey Makunin, James A. Cahill, Beth Shapiro, Francisco Álvares, José C. Brito, Eli Geffen, Jennifer A. Leonard, Kristofer M. Helgen, Warren E. Johnson, Stephen J. O'Brien, Blaire Van Valkenburgh & Robert K. Wayne
The golden jackal of Africa (Canis aureus) has long been considered a conspecific of jackals distributed throughout Eurasia, with the nearest source populations in the Middle East. However, two recent reports found that mitochondrial haplotypes of some African golden jackals aligned more closely to gray wolves (Canis lupus), which is surprising given the absence of gray wolves in Africa and the phenotypic divergence between the two species. Moreover, these results imply the existence of a...

Data from: Using filter-based community assembly models to improve restoration outcomes

Kristin B. Hulvey & Paul A. Aigner
1. Ecological filter models derived from community assembly theory can inform restoration planning by highlighting management actions most likely to affect community composition. Despite growing interest in these models, many restoration studies solely manipulate a single filter—the biotic filter by altering interspecific competition in studies—while ignoring abiotic and dispersal filters that may also influence restoration success. 2. To examine how manipulating all three filters (biotic, abiotic, dispersal) affected restoration in an annual-type grassland, we seeded...

Data from: Shape-shift: semicircular canal morphology responds to selective breeding for increased locomotor activity

Heidi Schutz, Heather A. Jamniczky, Benedikt Hallgrímsson, & Theodore Garland
Variation in semicircular canal morphology correlates with locomotor agility among species of mammals. An experimental evolutionary mouse model was used to test the hypotheses that semicircular canal morphology (1) evolves in response to selective breeding for increased locomotor activity, (2) exhibits phenotypic plasticity in response to early-onset chronic exercise, and (3) is unique in individuals possessing the minimuscle phenotype. We examined responses in canal morphology to prolonged wheel access and selection in laboratory mice from...

Data from: Down-regulation of Rad51 activity during meiosis in yeast prevents competition with Dmc1 for repair of double-strand breaks

Yan Liu, William A. Gaines, Tracy Callender, Valeria Busygina, Ashwini Oke, Patrick Sung, Jennifer C. Fung & Nancy M. Hollingsworth
Interhomolog recombination plays a critical role in promoting proper meiotic chromosome segregation but a mechanistic understanding of this process is far from complete. In vegetative cells, Rad51 is a highly conserved recombinase that exhibits a preference for repairing double strand breaks (DSBs) using sister chromatids, in contrast to the conserved, meiosis-specific recombinase, Dmc1, which preferentially repairs programmed DSBs using homologs. Despite the different preferences for repair templates, both Rad51 and Dmc1 are required for interhomolog...

Data from: Signal architecture: temporal variability and individual consistency of multiple sexually selected signals

Alexis S. Chaine & Bruce E. Lyon
1. Multiple signals should be favoured when the benefit of additional signals outweigh their costs. Despite increased attention on multiple-signalling systems, few studies have focused on signal architecture to understand the potential information content of multiple signals. 2. To understand the patterns of signal plasticity and consistency over the lifetime of individuals we conducted a longitudinal study of multiple signals known to be under sexual selection in male lark buntings, Calamospiza melanocorys. 3. Within years,...

Data from: Selection for territory acquisition is modulated by social network structure in a wild songbird

Damien R. Farine & Ben C. Sheldon
The social environment may be a key mediator of selection that operates on animals. In many cases, individuals may experience selection not only as a function of their phenotype, but also as a function of the interaction between their phenotype and the phenotypes of the conspecifics they associate with. For example, when animals settle after dispersal, individuals may benefit from arriving early, but, in many cases, these benefits will be affected by the arrival times...

Data from: Small-scale restoration in intensive agricultural landscapes supports more specialized and less mobile pollinator species

Claire Kremen & Leithen K. M'Gonigle
1. Agriculture now constitutes 40–50% of terrestrial land use globally. By enhancing habitat suitability and connectivity, restoration within agricultural landscapes could have a major influence on biodiversity conservation. However, habitat management within intensive agricultural landscapes may primarily boost abundances of common, highly mobile generalists, rather than vulnerable or endangered species. We studied pollinator community response to small-scale habitat restoration in the intensively farmed Central Valley of California to determine whether restoration could also promote more...

Data from: Heritability and genetic correlations of personality traits in a wild population of yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventris)

Matthew B. Petelle, Julien G. A. Martin & Daniel T. Blumstein
Describing and quantifying animal personality is now an integral part of behavioural studies because individually distinctive behaviours have ecological and evolutionary consequences. Yet, to fully understand how personality traits may respond to selection, one must understand the underlying heritability and genetic correlations between traits. Previous studies have reported a moderate degree of heritability of personality traits but few of these studies have either been conducted in the wild or estimated the genetic correlations between personality...

Data from: Functional homogenization of flower visitor communities with urbanization

Nicolas Deguines, Romain Julliard, Mathieu De Flores & Colin Fontaine
Land-use intensification and resulting habitat loss are put forward as the main causes of flower visitor decline. However, the impact of urbanization, the prime driver of land-use intensification in Europe, is poorly studied. In particular, our understanding of whether and how it affects the composition and functioning of flower visitor assemblages is scant, yet required to cope with increasing urbanization worldwide. Here, we use a nation-wide dataset of plant-flower visitor (Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera) interactions...

Data from: Gut microbiota regulate motor deficits and neuroinflammation in a model of Parkinson’s disease

Timothy R. Sampson, Justine W. Debelius, Taren Thron, Stefan Janssen, Gauri G. Shastri, Zehra Esra Ilhan, Collin Challis, Catherine E. Schretter, Sandra Rocha, Viviana Gradinaru, Marie-Francoise Chesselet, Ali Keshavarzian, Kathleen M. Shannon, Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown, Pernilla Wittung-Stafshede, Rob Knight & Sarkis K. Mazmanian
The intestinal microbiota influence neurodevelopment, modulate behavior, and contribute to neurological disorders. However, a functional link between gut bacteria and neurodegenerative diseases remains unexplored. Synucleinopathies are characterized by aggregation of the protein α-synuclein (αSyn), often resulting in motor dysfunction as exemplified by Parkinson’s disease (PD). Using mice that overexpress αSyn, we report herein that gut microbiota are required for motor deficits, microglia activation, and αSyn pathology. Antibiotic treatment ameliorates, while microbial re-colonization promotes, pathophysiology in...

Data from: Pollution-tolerant invertebrates enhance greenhouse gas flux in urban wetlands

Andrew S. Mehring, Perran L.M. Cook, Victor Evrard, Stanley B. Grant, Lisa A. Levin & Perran L. M. Cook
One of the goals of urban ecology is to link community structure to ecosystem function in urban habitats. Pollution-tolerant wetland invertebrates have been shown to enhance greenhouse gas (GHG) flux in controlled laboratory experiments, suggesting that they may influence urban wetland roles as sources or sinks of GHG. However, it is unclear if their effects can be detected in highly variable conditions in a field setting. Here we use an extensive dataset on carbon dioxide...

Data from: Climate and landscape drive the pace and pattern of conifer encroachment into subalpine meadows

Kaitlin C. Lubetkin, Anthony Leroy Westerling & Lara M. Kueppers
Mountain meadows have high biodiversity and help regulate stream water release following the snowmelt pulse. However, many meadows are experiencing woody plant encroachment, threatening these ecosystem services. While there have been field surveys of individual meadows and remote sensing-based landscape-scale studies of encroachment, what is missing is a broad scale, ground-based study to understand common regional drivers, especially at high elevations, where land management has often played a less direct role. With this study we...

Data from: Suitability of Laurentian Great Lakes for invasive species based on global species distribution models and local habitat

Andrew M. Kramer, Gust Annis, Marion E. Wittmann, William L. Chadderton, Edward S. Rutherford, David M. Lodge, Lacey Mason, Dmitry Beletsky, Catherine Riseng & John M. Drake
Efficient management and prevention of species invasions requires accurate prediction of where species of concern can arrive and persist. Species distribution models provide one way to identify potentially suitable habitat by developing the relationship between climate variables and species occurrence data. However, these models when applied to freshwater invasions are complicated by two factors. The first is that the range expansions that typically occur as part of the invasion process violate standard species distribution model...

Data from: Do impacts of an invasive nitrogen-fixing shrub on Douglas-fir and its ectomycorrhizal mutualism change over time following invasion?

Sara Grove, Ingrid M. Parker & Karen A. Haubensak
1. Impacts of invasive species may change in magnitude and even direction with invasion age. Impacts could increase as the population increases, individuals grow in size, and ecological changes accumulate. 2. We used a chronosequence approach to characterize the development of soil impacts over time following the invasion of Cytisus scoparius, a widespread nitrogen-fixing shrub thought to limit reforestation success. In a greenhouse experiment, we evaluated how abundance of ectomycorrhizal fungi, Douglas-fir performance, and leaf...

Data from: History cleans up messes: the impact of time in driving divergence and introgression in a tropical suture zone

Sonal Singhal & Ke Bi
Contact zones provide an excellent arena in which to address questions about how genomic divergence evolves during lineage divergence. They allow us to both infer patterns of genomic divergence in allopatric populations isolated from introgression and to characterize patterns of introgression after lineages meet. Thusly motivated, we analyze genome-wide introgression data from four contact zones in three genera of lizards endemic to the Australian Wet Tropics. These contact zones all formed between morphologically cryptic lineage-pairs...

Data from: Fit for genomic and proteomic purposes: sampling the fitness of nucleic acid and protein derivatives from formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue

Anna Yakovleva, Jordan L. Plieskatt, Sarah Jensen, Razan Humeida, Jonathan Lange, Guangzhao Li, Paige Bracci, Sylvia Silver, Jeffrey Michael Bethony & Jonathan Lang
The demand for nucleic acid and protein derivatives from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue has greatly increased due to advances in extraction and purification methods, making these derivatives available for numerous genomic and proteomic platforms. Previously, DNA, RNA, microRNA (miRNA), or protein derived from FFPE tissue blocks were considered "unfit" for such platforms, as the process of tissue immobilization by FFPE resulted in cross-linked, fragmented, and chemically modified macromolecules. We conducted a systematic examination of nucleic...

Data from: Atoll-scale patterns in coral reef community structure: Human signatures on Ulithi Atoll, Micronesia

Nicole L. Crane, Peter Nelson, Avigdor Abelson, Kristin Precoda, , Giacomo Bernardi & Michelle Paddack
The dynamic relationship between reefs and the people who utilize them at a subsistence level is poorly understood. This paper characterizes atoll-scale patterns in shallow coral reef habitat and fish community structure, and correlates these with environmental characteristics and anthropogenic factors, critical to conservation efforts for the reefs and the people who depend on them. Hierarchical clustering analyses by site for benthic composition and fish community resulted in the same 3 major clusters: cluster 1–oceanic...

Data from: Form–function relationships in a marine foundation species depend on scale: a shoot to global perspective from a distributed ecological experiment

Jennifer L. Ruesink, John J. Stachowicz, Pamela L. Reynolds, Christoffer Boström, Mathieu Cusson, James Douglass, Johan Eklöf, Aschwin H. Engelen, Masakazu Hori, Kevin Hovel, Katrin Iken, Per-Olav Moksnes, Masahiro Nakaoka, Mary I. O'Connor, Jeanine L. Olsen, Erik E. Sotka, Matthew A. Whalen & Emmett J. Duffy
Form-function relationships in plants underlie their ecosystem roles in supporting higher trophic levels through primary production, detrital pathways, and habitat provision. For widespread, phenotypically-variable plants, productivity may differ not only across abiotic conditions, but also from distinct morphological or demographic traits. A single foundation species, eelgrass (Zostera marina), typically dominates north temperate seagrass meadows, which we studied across 14 sites spanning 32-61° N latitude and two ocean basins. Body size varied by nearly two orders...

Data from: Differential persistence favors habitat preferences that determine the distribution of a reef fish

John E. Majoris, Cassidy C. D'Aloia, Robin K. Francis & Peter M. Buston
A central focus of population ecology is understanding what factors explain the distribution and abundance of organisms within their range. This is a key issue in marine systems, where many organisms produce dispersive larvae that develop offshore before returning to settle on benthic habitat. We investigated the distribution of the neon goby, Elacatinus lori, on sponge habitat and evaluated whether variation in the persistence of recently settled individuals (i.e., settlers) among different sponge types can...

Data from: Environmental filtering by pH and soil nutrients drives community assembly in fungi at fine spatial scales

Sydney I. Glassman, Ian J. Wang & Thomas D. Bruns
Whether niche processes, like environmental filtering, or neutral processes, like dispersal limitation, are the primary forces driving community assembly is a central question in ecology. Here, we use a natural experimental system of isolated tree “islands” to test whether environment or geography primarily structures fungal community composition at fine spatial scales. This system consists of isolated pairs of two distantly-related, congeneric pine trees established at varying distances from each other and the forest edge, allowing...

Data from: Microhaplotypes provide increased power from short-read DNA sequences for relationship inference

Diana S. Baetscher, Anthony J. Clemento, Thomas C. Ng, Eric C. Anderson & John C. Garza
The accelerating rate at which DNA sequence data is now generated by high-throughput sequencing instruments provides both opportunities and challenges for population genetic and ecological investigations of animals and plants. We show here how the common practice of calling genotypes from a single SNP per sequenced region ignores substantial additional information in the phased short-read sequences that are provided by high-throughput sequencing instruments. We target sequenced regions with multiple SNPs in kelp rockfish (Sebastes atrovirens)...

Data from: Experimental parasite community ecology: intraspecific variation in a large tapeworm affects community assembly

Daniel P. Benesh & Martin Kalbe
Non-random species associations occur in naturally-sampled parasite communities. The processes resulting in predictable community structure (e.g. particular host behaviours, cross-immunity, interspecific competition) could be affected by traits that vary within a parasite species, like growth or antigenicity. We experimentally infected three-spined sticklebacks with a large tapeworm (Schistocephalus solidus) that impacts the energy needs, foraging behaviour, and immune reactions of its host. The tapeworms came from two populations, characterized by high or low growth in sticklebacks....

Data from: Discovery and characterization of single nucleotide polymorphisms in two anadromous alosine fishes of conservation concern

Diana S. Baetscher, Daniel J. Hasselman, Kerry Reid, Eric P. Palkovacs & John Carlos Garza
Freshwater habitat alteration and marine fisheries can affect anadromous fish species, and populations fluctuating in size elicit conservation concern and coordinated management. We describe the development and characterization of two sets of 96 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assays for two species of anadromous alosine fishes, alewife and blueback herring (collectively known as river herring), that are native to the Atlantic coast of North America. We used data from high-throughput DNA sequencing to discover SNPs and...

Data from: Competing for seed dispersal: evidence for the role of avian seed hoarders in mediating apparent predation among oaks

Mario B. Pesendorfer & Walter D. Koenig
In communities of large-seeded tree species, generalist seed hoarders often link the temporally variable dynamics of various species in ways that can result in indirect ecological interactions. A special case of such interactions is ‘apparent predation’ – when variation in seed production of one tree species changes the outcome of the interaction between seed hoarders and another tree species from seed dispersal mutualism to predation. We investigated how two species of avian hoarders responded to...

Data from: Are extraversion and openness indicators of a slow life history strategy?

Joseph H. Manson
Theory and data generally concur that a slower Life History Strategy (LHS) is associated with higher Conscientiousness, Agreeableness and Emotional Stability. Whether Extraversion and Openness are indicators of a slow LH, or whether they include both fast and slow LH components, remains unresolved. I addressed these questions in two studies: one of university students observed via periodic brief audio recordings during 72 hours of their daily lives, and the second a re-analysis of data from...

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